19th c Reuben Andrews 8-Day Rack and Snail Wood Works Pawlet VT.

Jim DuBois

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In December of 2021, a local party pictured an unusual woodworks clock movement and dial on FaceBook. Firstly, it was unusual in that it was an 8-day woodworks. Only a very small percentage of woodworks clocks are 8-day; the vast majority are 30 hour, as most collectors know. This one was also rack and snail strike. Our membership and associates/professionals know of less and a half dozen woodworks rach and snail strikers done up in wood.

It is unsigned but it is similar to other known examples. We can attribute it convincingly to Reuben Andrews of Pawlet, VT. Those examples can be found in Philip Morris's book on American Wooden Movement Tall Clocks 1712-1835 circa 1802-1805.

An offer was made and not accepted, and an attempt was made to visit and photograph the movement. The owner had provided some decent photos in his original post, so the planned trip was more to lust over the parts and obtain an agreement to sell than much else. Never happened. The owner and I traded messages several times over the last three months, not resulting in my seeing it. I had given up on it, assuming it was a lost opportunity.

Finally, on 2-24-22, we traded messages, and today I was able to buy the movement and dial and bring it home to join the backlog of work.

Condition report;
It is in decidedly better condition than anticipated
  • All its train wheels are complete with no needed repair work necessary so far.
  • Motion works idler wheel needs a partial tooth tip replacement
  • Missing the post the idler wheel mounts on
  • Missing its gathering pallet
  • Missing its bell stand and bell
  • Crutch is bent into a pretzel
  • Dial mounting pins broken off in retaining strips
  • Needs some rust removal from control wires
  • May need some bushing work, but there is surprisingly little wear apparent
  • Missing one compound pulley and the remaining pulley needs repairs on its lips.
  • Missing its hands
  • Day drive wheel needs 3 teeth replaced/repaired
  • Dial needs some very careful cleaning
  • And of course, it requires some sympathetic cleaning of the movement parts and restringing of the weight cords
So, all in all, I have done the usual, converted a pocket of cash into a disparate and dusty assembly of future work. But, it is an interesting piece of work and I am happy to own it.

20220225_111140 (2).jpg 20220225_111018 (2).jpg 20220225_111150 1 (2).jpg 20220225_111155.jpg 20220225_111122 (2).jpg 20220225_111048.jpg
 
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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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In December of 2021, a local party pictured an unusual woodworks clock movement and dial on FaceBook. Firstly, it was unusual in that it was an 8-day woodworks. Only a very small percentage of woodworks clocks are 8-day; the vast majority are 30 hour, as most collectors know. This one was also rack and snail strike. Our membership and associates/professionals know of less and a half dozen woodworks rach and snail strikers done up in wood.

It is unsigned but it is similar to other known examples. We can attribute it convincingly to Reuben Andrews of Pawlet, VT. Those examples can be found in Philip Morris's book on American Wooden Movement Tall Clocks 1712-1835 circa 1802-1805.

An offer was made and not accepted, and an attempt was made to visit and photograph the movement. The owner had provided some decent photos in his original post, so the planned trip was more to lust over the parts and obtain an agreement to sell than much else. Never happened. The owner and I traded messages several times over the last three months, not resulting in my seeing it. I had given up on it, assuming it was a lost opportunity.

Finally, on 2-24-22, we traded messages, and today I was able to buy the movement and dial and bring it home to join the backlog of work.

Condition report;
It is in decidedly better condition than anticipated
  • All its train wheels are complete with no needed repair work necessary so far.
  • Motion works idler wheel needs a partial tooth tip replacement
  • Missing the post the idler wheel mounts on
  • Missing its gathering pallet
  • Missing its bell stand and bell
  • Crutch is bent into a pretzel
  • Dial mounting pins broken off in retaining strips
  • Needs some rust removal from control wires
  • May need some bushing work, but there is surprisingly little wear apparent
  • Missing one compound pulley and the remaining pulley needs repairs on its lips.
  • Missing its hands
  • Day drive wheel needs 3 teeth replaced/repaired
  • Dial needs some very careful cleaning
  • And of course, it requires some sympathetic cleaning of the movement parts and restringing of the weight cords
So, all in all, I have done the usual, converted a pocket of cash into a disparate and dusty assembly of future work. But, it is an interesting piece of work and I am happy to own it.

View attachment 697450 View attachment 697454 View attachment 697455 View attachment 697456 View attachment 697458 View attachment 697460
Very interesting. Love the dial, too.

Gotta check the WW Forum more often.

RM
 
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Raymond Rice

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In December of 2021, a local party pictured an unusual woodworks clock movement and dial on FaceBook. Firstly, it was unusual in that it was an 8-day woodworks. Only a very small percentage of woodworks clocks are 8-day; the vast majority are 30 hour, as most collectors know. This one was also rack and snail strike. Our membership and associates/professionals know of less and a half dozen woodworks rach and snail strikers done up in wood.

It is unsigned but it is similar to other known examples. We can attribute it convincingly to Reuben Andrews of Pawlet, VT. Those examples can be found in Philip Morris's book on American Wooden Movement Tall Clocks 1712-1835 circa 1802-1805.

An offer was made and not accepted, and an attempt was made to visit and photograph the movement. The owner had provided some decent photos in his original post, so the planned trip was more to lust over the parts and obtain an agreement to sell than much else. Never happened. The owner and I traded messages several times over the last three months, not resulting in my seeing it. I had given up on it, assuming it was a lost opportunity.

Finally, on 2-24-22, we traded messages, and today I was able to buy the movement and dial and bring it home to join the backlog of work.

Condition report;
It is in decidedly better condition than anticipated
  • All its train wheels are complete with no needed repair work necessary so far.
  • Motion works idler wheel needs a partial tooth tip replacement
  • Missing the post the idler wheel mounts on
  • Missing its gathering pallet
  • Missing its bell stand and bell
  • Crutch is bent into a pretzel
  • Dial mounting pins broken off in retaining strips
  • Needs some rust removal from control wires
  • May need some bushing work, but there is surprisingly little wear apparent
  • Missing one compound pulley and the remaining pulley needs repairs on its lips.
  • Missing its hands
  • Day drive wheel needs 3 teeth replaced/repaired
  • Dial needs some very careful cleaning
  • And of course, it requires some sympathetic cleaning of the movement parts and restringing of the weight cords
So, all in all, I have done the usual, converted a pocket of cash into a disparate and dusty assembly of future work. But, it is an interesting piece of work and I am happy to own it.

View attachment 697450 View attachment 697454 View attachment 697455 View attachment 697456 View attachment 697458 View attachment 697460
In December of 2021, a local party pictured an unusual woodworks clock movement and dial on FaceBook. Firstly, it was unusual in that it was an 8-day woodworks. Only a very small percentage of woodworks clocks are 8-day; the vast majority are 30 hour, as most collectors know. This one was also rack and snail strike. Our membership and associates/professionals know of less and a half dozen woodworks rach and snail strikers done up in wood.

It is unsigned but it is similar to other known examples. We can attribute it convincingly to Reuben Andrews of Pawlet, VT. Those examples can be found in Philip Morris's book on American Wooden Movement Tall Clocks 1712-1835 circa 1802-1805.

An offer was made and not accepted, and an attempt was made to visit and photograph the movement. The owner had provided some decent photos in his original post, so the planned trip was more to lust over the parts and obtain an agreement to sell than much else. Never happened. The owner and I traded messages several times over the last three months, not resulting in my seeing it. I had given up on it, assuming it was a lost opportunity.

Finally, on 2-24-22, we traded messages, and today I was able to buy the movement and dial and bring it home to join the backlog of work.

Condition report;
It is in decidedly better condition than anticipated
  • All its train wheels are complete with no needed repair work necessary so far.
  • Motion works idler wheel needs a partial tooth tip replacement
  • Missing the post the idler wheel mounts on
  • Missing its gathering pallet
  • Missing its bell stand and bell
  • Crutch is bent into a pretzel
  • Dial mounting pins broken off in retaining strips
  • Needs some rust removal from control wires
  • May need some bushing work, but there is surprisingly little wear apparent
  • Missing one compound pulley and the remaining pulley needs repairs on its lips.
  • Missing its hands
  • Day drive wheel needs 3 teeth replaced/repaired
  • Dial needs some very careful cleaning
  • And of course, it requires some sympathetic cleaning of the movement parts and restringing of the weight cords
So, all in all, I have done the usual, converted a pocket of cash into a disparate and dusty assembly of future work. But, it is an interesting piece of work and I am happy to own it.

View attachment 697450 View attachment 697454 View attachment 697455 View attachment 697456 View attachment 697458 View attachment 697460
Wow! What a great find. An excellent use for a "pocket of cash".
 

Peter A. Nunes

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Here are pictures of another example, from my collection. This one is depicted in Philip Morris's book, along with another example that i have since sold. This example is the only example with a signed dial. The numerals are a beautiful cobalt blue, hard to see in the pictures.

reubenandrews#4dial.JPG reubenandrews#4dialbluenumeral.JPG reubenandrews#4dialsignature.JPG reubenandrews#4complete.JPG reuben#4frontmo.JPG reuben#4moveside.JPG
 

Jim DuBois

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Peter, thanks for the addition of your excellent examples to this thread. Great photography too! I have completed the work necessary to return the one I have to operational condition. It was remarkable in that the only tooth work required was the replacement of a single tooth on the motion works idler. All the train wheels and pinions required no more than a general dusting and cleaning of rust off the pivots. As noted in Philips book, and like one of the examples there, the time train on this clock is compounded while the strike train is not. The strike train requires a 2 pallet gathering pallet. As also noted in the book, these movements differ from many wood works tall clock movements in the engineering of the trains. The trains in these clocks are near duplicates of 8-day brass movements, the great wheel driving the center shaft, followed by a 3rd wheel and then an escape wheel. (4 arbor train). This all results in high (and fine) tooth count wheels. The center wheel is over 4" in diameter for example with many teeth...I didn't count them....the entire train on both sides requires the finely cut teeth....quite a feat of wood selection and manufacturing that these survive today intact while many of their more roughly and apparently robustly made contemporaries had a lot of dental work. There are 3 repaired teeth on one wheel, and a single tooth repair by using a square nail in the fly pinion, that is it and they were done a very long time ago. A new set of pewter hands, aged just a bit, some soapstone weights and it is off to the races so to speak. Now, if I just had a case proper for it?

Oh, another little special feature of these clocks, the escutions on the dials are nailed on using 2 small nails/pins on the dials. They can be seen on the photo of the dial backside, last photo. Also, thanks to Peter for pointing out this little item of interest.

20220308_100230.jpg 20220308_143520 (2).jpg 20220314_142532 1.jpg 20220308_100230.jpg 20220308_143518.jpg 20220314_135843.jpg 20220308_143536.jpg 20220314_135849.jpg 20220226_083619.jpg
 
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Peter A. Nunes

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Here are a few pictures of the Andrews that I sold several years ago. Each movement is slightly different from the next, while maintaining the same basic design. This is the sort of thing that you might get to see at the Cog Counter's meeting that we hold every year in central New York, just prior to the Eastern States Regional.
Photos courtesy of Philip Morris.
andrews#5dial.JPG andrews#5dialcartouche - Copy.JPG andrewsmov#5.JPG andrewsmov#5side.JPG reubenandrews#5complete.JPG
 
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