Restoration of split nickel alarm clock cases

Discussion in 'Clock Case Restoration and Repair' started by Raymond McGeary, Sep 3, 2019.

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  1. Raymond McGeary

    Raymond McGeary Registered User
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    Jun 16, 2010
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    Has anyone discovered a proper technique for the restoration of the splits frequently seen in metal (nickel) legged alarm clock cases? In my experience, Waterbury alarms are often subject to this problem. Attempted repair with lumps of lead solder smeared across the case is not a satisfactory solution. I'd rather see the splits.
     
  2. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User
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    Jun 6, 2016
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    I have not found an economical solution to splits in thin metal cases.I think brazing or welding would restore the integrity of the metal, but repairing the finish afterwards would be a problem. The last time I got a quote for re-chroming a small carriage type clock was $300. The clock wasn't worth more than $10, so I passed on that. I've tried JB weld on a small dial trim. It structurally held the split, but you could still see the split if you looked.
     
  3. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    It's a big problem with 400 day clock bases too. The JB weld is probably as good as any solution.
     
  4. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    Yes. I agree. I have had quite good results with JB weld on 400 day clock bases and those thin barrel-like things that French round movements often have and which are inserted into a wooden case.

    If you make the JB weld on the inside, once it is hard you can file or smooth it with a Dremel. The hardest bit, I find, is keeping the two edges of the split neatly together while it dries. In the end the best solution I could find was tough plastic tape.

    JTD
     

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