Repurposing IBM/Simplex Slave Clocks - Time setting???

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by davefr, Jul 7, 2019.

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  1. davefr

    davefr Registered User
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    Nov 29, 2008
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    I have a couple big IBM slave clocks from around the 1950's. (model 57-45). These have the Synchron 120 VAC movements with the relay that puts the clock into fast forward mode until the top of the hour.

    I'd like to use one as a general shop clock but it looks like there's no easy way to set the time without the master clock and hard wire connections to it.

    Generic Hanson electric movements would be a PIA to retrofit and hell will freeze over before I'd ever convert a classic electric clock to quartz.

    Has anyone come up with an easy way to use one as a general shop clock and easily set the time?

    It appears the only way is to engage fast forward mode to a future time and then wait for real time to catch up and then plug it in.
     
  2. ElectricTime

    ElectricTime Registered User
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  3. caperace

    caperace Registered User

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    You could use 2 single pole switches, one to shut the power off and the other to control the relay.
     
  4. davefr

    davefr Registered User
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    I'm thinking that these clock movements have all the capability to fast forward to a specific time. There should be no reason something like a Rasberry Pi with a relay could be placed inside the case and used to provide fully automated self correction. (like a miniature master clock about the size of a pack of cigarettes).

    All you'd need to do is start the fast forward at 11:00 PM every day and have the Rasberry Pi start synchronized timekeeping by triggering a simple relay.

    Another idea is a wireless switch triggered by a RF keyfob that starts the manual correction cycle. You'd have to perform the correction manually but wouldn't have to touch the clock.

    Anyone do anything similar
     
  5. skruft

    skruft Registered User
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    One way would be to find a used electronic, digital master clock, any of the many models that could be set to provide the correction signals to various brands of slave clocks. These were made in great numbers years ago to keep old systems running without having to maintain the original master clocks.
     
  6. paradise

    paradise Registered User
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    Check out " KCC SCIENTIFIC " Model 1900 W. Solved the problem for me.
     
  7. ibm clock

    ibm clock Registered User

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    #7 ibm clock, Nov 4, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2019
    his clocks are synchronous. that controller only works with minute impulse clocks.

    if its the older style clocks with metal cases, the glass comes off by pulling the wire spring off. set hands manually. or manually trip the correction cam on the back of the movement.

    another thing you could do, is replace the correction coil with a 110v one from an old three wire system. wire in a pushbutton to engage the correction cam. i forget how many seconds. too long and it gets set into 12 hour correction instead of one hour. you can find 110v coils from American Time and Signal. i say change the coil becasue your clock may hve a lower voltage coil if it was used with the old system where the correction pulse was superimposed on the builing AC wires, and not directly wired back to the master.

    Note: you cannot set it to a specific time other than xx:00. but im sure you knew that.
     

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