Reproducing Labels - Have you seen it done?

f.webster

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I have been planning the restoration of a Metropolitan Eclipse (E. N. Welch) clock. Both of the labels on the back of the clock are missing. It has been suggested that someone may have thought that as a E.N. Welch it may have been of greater value. In planning a restoration to original, I would like to reproduce these labels and put them in there proper place.

I have seen images showing these labels on the web. Not completely legible; however, they have given me some idea what I am looking for. I have looked through multiple catalogs that included reproduced labels but saw nothing.

Seems I will need to reproduce these labels myself. Thinking about how this might be accomplished. Anyone have any ideas?

H2000-L240123295.jpg
 

bruce linde

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find the best versions you can, take hi-resolution well-lit photos, and then piece together a perfect version in photoshop (or gimp).

i did this with the original black labels found in early seth thomas regulator 2s.

it is commonly advised on the MB that replacement labels NOT be permanently affixed... but since yours are missing, why not?
 

ChimeTime

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I second many of Bruce's ideas.
1. Download a free copy of a photo editing program called GIMP
2. Find a source for manila card stock at your local art supply dealer. Thicker than office paper, but not as thick as a post card. (You can still print all your drafts and proofs on office paper.) I would not suggest using pre-gummed label stock, such as Avery.
3. Hopefully you have access to a laser printer that allows feeding paper from a side port typically used for envelope printing. This will prevent the severe bending your label will receive if fed from the standard paper tray.
4. I would suggest using an spray adhesive applied as a last step, after printing. Your art supply dealer should have several grades.

A second method would be to load your artwork file onto a "thumb drive" and take it to your local sign/banner/poster printer. They'll have high end printers and be adept at tweaking your artwork to have your label look as old as your clock.
 
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bruce linde

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actually, the most important thing is to have high resolution artwork… once you have that you can use a commercial service to get them printed. i get 50 of my ST labels printed and delivered for less than $40.. and have sold many of them. vistaprint is a good resource, but it depend on what stock you want, glossy or not, and other options.

but it all starts with the artwork.
 

Andy Dervan

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There is one problem - the new label may confuse people thinking it is original. it is somewhat deceptive.

Andy Dervan
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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I have been planning the restoration of a Metropolitan Eclipse (E. N. Welch) clock. Both of the labels on the back of the clock are missing. It has been suggested that someone may have thought that as a E.N. Welch it may have been of greater value. In planning a restoration to original, I would like to reproduce these labels and put them in there proper place.

I have seen images showing these labels on the web. Not completely legible; however, they have given me some idea what I am looking for. I have looked through multiple catalogs that included reproduced labels but saw nothing.

Seems I will need to reproduce these labels myself. Thinking about how this might be accomplished. Anyone have any ideas?

View attachment 677394
A reproduction label increasing value??

Don't think so.

Do you then artificially age a reproduction label?

If I saw a reproduction/artificially aged anything on an antique, it would make me question the overall integrity of the object, i.e., what else has been replaced or restored) and I would probably pass on it or offer much less.

Furthermore, the general level of knowledge about antiques isn't encouraging. I have been to auctions and shows where repop labels in clocks, printed by a high quality laser printer or photocopier, were missed for what they were, thus inflating the price of the object.

An example of what can happen and the state of knowledge. Not a clock but makes the point just the same. I just recently saw for sale a small slide top box with a label for a Shaker herbal remedy that everyone was cooing and clucking over, including folks that deal in some high end stuff. Just a loose label like that has a lot of value.

I looked at it and laughed.

A period label would have been printed by a press, thus slightly indenting the paper under the lettering. On this label, the lettering was built up on the surface of the paper...by a LASER printer! If one studied the label carefully, the stains and even a tiny loss in the corner were printed. The box was real. The paper old. There are lots of sources of period paper (derelict old books, for example).

So a repop label can confuse and deceive even if not the original intent. To me, the box was now worthless, not worth more.

This topic has been discussed previously.

Reproduction labels are bad and to be discouraged.

Find a book that shows the label, photocopy the page and keep it with the clock and pass it on to the new owner.

RM
 

ToddT

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Find a book that shows the label, photocopy the page and keep it with the clock and pass it on to the new owner.
I really like that suggestion. Certainly there is value in having the original label attached to the clock in terms of overall completeness. But part of the interest (at least for me) is the information the label provides - manufacturer, style, clues to dating the item, etc. There is value in that information, too, even if not in its original format (i.e. a photocopy).
 

Calvin H. Huynh

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I would go preserve labels but maybe not try to add new stuff, unless it's for aesthetics and presenting an exhibit or something (such as having a closed case with a label next to or in the clock for reference.) Again, repro labels should be passed on as a "reproduction", but I think it would be bad to say it's original. A plus, a reproduction instruction booklet or sheet can be pleasing as a novelty.

BTW, Renaissance wax does wonders for label preservation.
 

c.kugle

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I have been planning the restoration of a Metropolitan Eclipse (E. N. Welch) clock. Both of the labels on the back of the clock are missing. It has been suggested that someone may have thought that as a E.N. Welch it may have been of greater value. In planning a restoration to original, I would like to reproduce these labels and put them in there proper place.

I have seen images showing these labels on the web. Not completely legible; however, they have given me some idea what I am looking for. I have looked through multiple catalogs that included reproduced labels but saw nothing.

Seems I will need to reproduce these labels myself. Thinking about how this might be accomplished. Anyone have any ideas?

View attachment 677394
A hi-resolution replacement label will not enhance value and in some cases diminish it to an extent. If I uses a replacement for my own purpose I use aged ones if I have to replace a backboard on a clock. A little tweeking to get the color close to the wood and a light coat of diluted glue to adhere it in place.. But like I said that is for my own eye-candy and not for any value....
 
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