Replacing pocket watch pivot jewels

timekeeper10708

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Mar 9, 2022
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Hi, I'm a hobbyist who's trying to take the next step in my learning - replacing pocket watch jewels. I have a horia jewel press, a Feintaster micrometer, and tools for opening/reaming and closing the jewel chaton, or for rubbed in plate jewels. My concern is that I understand that modern day replacement jewels like seitz or borel are mostly incompatible with the settings in antique pocket watches? If this is so, how does one go about replacing jewels given that the only things available in the market in plentiful supply are the newer friction fit jewels (seitz and borel)? I apologize if this is an elementary question, it's just that I feel somewhat deflated having just purchased all the aforementioned tools. I thought I was totally ready to do the job, but appears I might also need a lathe! Thank you for any experiences you can share.
 

Skutt50

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Mar 14, 2008
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Welcome to the forum.

Old jewels were usually much lighter in color. Todays are much deeper red and sticks out in an old watch.

Old jewels were also thicker and e.g. cap jewels were not always round......

To replace an old jewel you need to find some old assortments with jewels. Not easy to find and those that have these usualy keep them for their own needs.....

Unfortunately, as with many used assortments, the most used items are gone so you might have to source more than one assortment to find the jewel you look for.
 

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