Replacing an Ansonia paper dial.

Discussion in 'Clock Case Restoration and Repair' started by etmb61, Aug 1, 2019.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 25, 2010
    2,090
    81
    48
    Retired
    Mascoutah, IL
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I'm working on an Ansonia iron clock and I want to replace the paper dial. I was looking for some pointers on how to proceed.

    dial1.jpg

    The brass edge is crimped onto the pan. The center trim is soldered.

    dial3.jpg

    What is the best way to work with the crimped edge? What is the best way to get the new paper lined up?

    I figured there would be a wealth of info and examples here but not so.

    Thanks,

    Eric
     
  2. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 9, 2006
    1,098
    116
    63
    Male
    Retired
    Atlanta, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I've replaced a number of these and this is my method. I first use a sharp scratch awl and mark a line on the 6 and 12 position. Make the mark through the paper dial on to the zink plate (not the brass). Then use a small edge flat screw driver and run it, (pulling it around), under the crimping that's over the dial. Lift it a small amount so that it is no longer touching the paper. Un-solder the center trim and remove it. To remove the old dial I soak it in used clock cleaning solution. It usually also requires some scraping as well. Clean the zink plate to bare metal. Be sure to clean under the edge of the crimping. Polishing and laqurering the brass is optional. The replacement paper dial needs to be sealed before handling it. Use a flat clear archival spray. (That can be found at most big box hardware stores.) Use at least two coats on both sides. Bare paper is very subject to finger prints, dirt and smudging. Sealing will protect the surface and make it easier attaching it to the dial and keep it clean. Use a dial cutter to cut out the outside diameter. Cut it slightly larger, just enough to get it under the crimping. I usually use up several sheets of scrap paper getting the outside diameter to what is needed. Re adjust the dial cutter to cut the center. To insert the new paper dial and glue it in place I use a very thin book scraping paper glue. It takes very little glue to hold the dial in place. Mark the 12 and 6 position on the brass with a piece of tape and transfer the zink plate marks to the tape. Wet the dial and plate with a good coat of the glue. Line up the dial 12 with the 12 tape mark and work the edge of the paper under the crimping. The glue should stay wet long enough to be able to move the paper dial around and get it lined up with both the 12 and the 6 markers and all edges under the crimping. Let dry at least 24 hours before trying to finish the rest of the dial. Use the round plastic end of a screwdriver and run it around the crimping to get it back down over the dial edges. (I use up a number of sheets of scrap paper to get the dial cutter to get exact diameters.) Trim the center diameter so the zink center fits in place and re-solder. If done correctly re-soldering should not damage the paper dial. Glue the center part of the dial in place. There is obviously some skill in doing this so I would recommend getting several extra replacement dials just in case.
     
    etmb61 likes this.
  3. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 25, 2010
    2,090
    81
    48
    Retired
    Mascoutah, IL
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Thanks for the detailed instructions. I did get several replacement dials. I figured I'd mess them up. I'll make some copies to practice on. I'll have to get me a dial cutter too.

    Do I just use a hobby knife around the winding holes?

    Eric
     
  4. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 9, 2006
    1,098
    116
    63
    Male
    Retired
    Atlanta, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I use a small Xacto knife. Cut down through the paper into the plate and along the curve. That way you won’t pull up the paper. Good idea, a dial cutter is a absolute must.
     
  5. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 19, 2005
    39,678
    533
    113
    Male
    Self employed interpreter/clock repairer
    Iowa
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Be careful with heat around the paper dial. They scorch easily. Photo editing programs are helpful in creating a nice dial with the right color.
     
  6. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 9, 2006
    1,098
    116
    63
    Male
    Retired
    Atlanta, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Another point, keep a damp rag handy and clean off any excess glue that might ooze out on to the dial or any finger prints.
     
  7. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Dec 9, 2006
    1,098
    116
    63
    Male
    Retired
    Atlanta, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Another idea. To solder the center piece without scorching the paper dial. The zink will take a more intense heat to get the solder to take. Be sure to clean the zink to bare metal at the solder points. Before installing the dial create small puddles of solder on the zink next to where you want to solder the center piece. You can also tin the brass with solder at those same points. After the dial parts are in place all you have to do is bridge the solder gap between the two. That should be faster to do and not apply so much heat that it will scorch the paper.
     
  8. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Oct 25, 2010
    2,090
    81
    48
    Retired
    Mascoutah, IL
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I have a 140w soldering gun. That should be easy enough to control without scorching anything, but I'll be careful.

    Thanks for all the great info!

    Eric
     

Share This Page