Repairing Pennwood Numechron clock

Keepingtime

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Feb 25, 2021
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Four questions:
1) what is the age of this Pennwood?
2) there is an undamaged section of the power cord left and the place where it enters the coil might be intact, I haven’t opened it. I was advised the wires that the cord attach within the coil might be very thin and brittle so repair has to be done carefully. How can I tell if the coil is damaged beyond repair?

3) where can I locate another motor or wire 'bobbin' or find a complete mechanism to simply replace the original one?

4) to find a completely replace mechanism, what do I need? I understand this movement is used in many clocks that go by the name(s) of Pennwood, Numechron and Tymeter. They come in 12 and 24 hour versions so I need to be very careful if buying an entire mechinism.

Thank you!

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shutterbug

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You can test the coil with the resistance setting on any cheap electrical tester. Test with the two probes touching each other. The meter should move, indicating a complete circuit. Now touch one probe to each end of the coil wire. If the meter reacts, the coil is good. No response indicates a break in the coil wire. When dealing with old coils, I like to coat things with Epoxy so I don't break something when fiddling with it. Be especially careful with the inner wire.
 

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Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff