Remove Gilbert back door

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by scottmiami, Feb 1, 2017.

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  1. scottmiami

    scottmiami Registered User

    May 14, 2014
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    Is there an intelligent way to remove this door, or is it a matter of bending the pins to get it out?

    The parts attached to the case are threaded in, so naturally I can't unscrew them with the door pins attached.

    Am I missing something?

    Thanks!
    Scott

    attachment.jpg attachment.jpg
     

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  2. dAz57

    dAz57 Registered User

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    A screw or nut on the inside of the case holding the hinge block?, I wouldn't try and bend the wire, it will snap off

    A photo of the inside of the case will help
     
  3. dad1891

    dad1891 Registered User

    Feb 28, 2014
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    Scott, I have a Gilbert awaiting restoration that appears to be identical. The problem with my clock is that the pins are loose in the wood and freely move about 1/4" in and out. Kind of makes me wonder if the pins aren't glued into the wood.

    Out of curiosity, why do you want to remove the door?
     
  4. scottmiami

    scottmiami Registered User

    May 14, 2014
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    Thanks! I might be able to get a nut on the lower one after removing it, but not the upper one.

    Pics taken from underneath, bottom removed:

    attachment.jpg attachment.jpg
     

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  5. scottmiami

    scottmiami Registered User

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    Loose also, but in my case it's the pieces in the case that are loose, not on the door.

    Here's a few pics of the clock when I got it:

    attachment.jpg attachment.jpg attachment.jpg

    A click apparently let loose.
     

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  6. scottmiami

    scottmiami Registered User

    May 14, 2014
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    I'm thinking you're probably right. Everything else is either threaded or attached in such a way that they cannot be removed otherwise.

    Incidentally, this provided additional fun with the countwheel being attached to the winding arbor:

    attachment.jpg
     

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  7. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

    Aug 17, 2014
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    If the pins are indeed glued into the body of the case (or into the door, perhaps) then the glue they used was presumably a hot animal glue. This stuff liquifies when heated, and the usual procedure for dismantling things like player pianos is to heat the glued pieces with a heat gun.

    You'll want to reglue with the same sort of thing so the next guy can undo it.

    M Kinsler
    gonna make cat glue from these excess cats around here.
     
  8. dad1891

    dad1891 Registered User

    Feb 28, 2014
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    I never would have thought of using heat, but it's better than any solution that I have come up with. My pins move quite freely for about 1/4" from their intended position, but they don't want to come all the way out. I'm going to apply some heat to the pin with a soldering iron and see if it works.
     
  9. scottmiami

    scottmiami Registered User

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    Good point MK.

    Dad, please let us know if it works for you, would like to see if the pins are threaded in the door or just glued. I will be out of town for a few days, can't try till next week here.
     
  10. dad1891

    dad1891 Registered User

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    Unfortunately, I think that you will end up blazing the trail on this one. That particular clock has several more urgent clocks in front of it. I can say that it definitely does not seem to be threaded. When threads are stripped you will usually feel some resistance and these pins slide in and out very easily and smoothly....but they don't come all the way out.
     
  11. scottmiami

    scottmiami Registered User

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    And the answer is.....


    attachment.jpg

    Threaded! Don't try pulling it out :)

    I did end up bending the pins / hinges. Pinges?

    Only way I could see.
     

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  12. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    So, were the small wire parts screwed in and the larger parts, with the holes, glued in? I've always wondered how these hinges were put together.
    Willie X
     
  13. scottmiami

    scottmiami Registered User

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    #13 scottmiami, Feb 7, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2017
    No, both the parts in the case and the door were threaded where they attach to wood. I really have no idea how they put the hinges / pins into the case part of the hinge other than bending. Compare the first post of the thread with tonights picture of the parts (with the current weirdness of the board, you can blow it up better by clicking the "attached thumbnail" and clicking it again in the new window to view full size). I would like to think there is a trick somewhere, just can't find it.
     
  14. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    I think you need three hands, and make the last quarter turn with the door in position to 'click' in place.
     
  15. scottmiami

    scottmiami Registered User

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    Perhaps. I'll give it a shot when I put it back together and report back. Seems like it would have to be a bit sloppy to get it in though.

    Not many volunteers....
     

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  16. BLKBEARD

    BLKBEARD Registered User

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    I can't really tell from your pictures, but it appears that one or both of the threaded posts are located at a joint in the wood frame. If so, they may have been pressed in sideways into a slot. then the joinery was glued, clamped & completed locking them in place.

    Again, I can't clearly see from your pictures if I'm looking at joints or scratches.
     
  17. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    My guesses would be that everything was made up and one of the wires was turned into place OR the pins were pushed in last into a slightly large hole with bit of glue; thats probably how I would do it (no bending).
    Willie X
     
  18. dAz57

    dAz57 Registered User

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    Ok it's been a while since I had one of these in, I think the last one I saw did have nuts on the inside holding the larger threaded piece, the thread isn't really suitable for screwing into wood, it's too fine,

    I would heat them up with say a large soldering iron to break any glue then press them out of the case back with a pin punch, then clean out the hole so the part will slide back in place, then find a pair of thin nuts to hold them in place, you may have to shave a little off the case inside to expose enough thread for the nut to screw on.
     
  19. scottmiami

    scottmiami Registered User

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    Thanks again folks!

    Blkbeard, you are correct in that one of the posts is in a joint, your explanation makes sense to me.

    Willie, maybe, but I would be concerned about the glue lasting for a good length of time.

    Daz, thanks, but they're not long enough to hold a nut on the inside, and one of them is indeed in a joint. The other could possibly receive a nut, but as you say, the case would require some shaving.

    I will try to take some better pictures so everyone has a clearer view of it for reference.

    Cheers!
    Scott
     
  20. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Any I've seen both posts face up, so the back door just lifts off.
     
  21. BLKBEARD

    BLKBEARD Registered User

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  22. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User
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    Won't let me add photos right now, so will do so later. Just removed the door with bolts like this. I too had to puzzle over it for awhile. This is how I did it. Open the door until it is perpendicular to the clock case. Turn the lower bolt with pliers (smooth face or use small piece of cloth) 90 degrees counterclockwise. (Didn't do that for the photos and nicked the wood!) As it turns, since it is treaded, it also turns the L-pin in the door 90 degrees, since it is also threaded. Slide the turned L-pin out of the hole, and the top L-pin slips out. Now, you can take both threaded bolts out easily. To put the door back, thread both bolts into their holes until they are in place and even. Upper bolt will have the pin hole vertical Turn the lower bolt back 90 degrees so its pin hole is horizontal. Slip the upper L-pin in its vertical bolt hole. Slide lower L-pin in horizontal hole. Turn the lower bolt 90 degrees clockwise.
     
  23. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User
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    Here's the photos. 309563.jpg 309565.jpg :coolsign:
     

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  24. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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