Remains of a Waldviertel Vorderzappler

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by ballistarius, Mar 23, 2017.

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  1. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

    Oct 26, 2009
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    Bilbao, Basque Country
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    Hello,

    It is nearly impossible to find wooden clocks here. Therefore, I couldn't resist when I saw the pitiful remains of this little one for sale, even if I knew beforehand that it will be never ticking again on my wall...:cuckoo:
    From what I could learn from Schaaf's Holzräderuhren book, the clock was most probably made in the Waldviertel region of Lower Austria. Despite its primitive appearance, it should not be older than 19th century.
    The clock is lacking dial, hands, motion gears, verge with cowtail pendulum, hammer, bell and countwheel.
    [​IMG]An upper view showing the crownwheel and the potence for front verge bushing and the cowtail pendulum.
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]Front, side, back and lower views.
    [​IMG][​IMG]Finally, two detail views of the crownwheel and potences for the werge. I guess that tthe round hole near the crownwheel was intended for the (glass?) bell stand.


    Regards,

    Aitor
     

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  2. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Oct 5, 2007
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    Hi, Aitor,

    Thanks for sharing your new found movement, and thanks, too, for saving it! I'm so glad that you were able to recognize it for what it was, and now it will be safe from further deterioration thanks to your efforts. The curved metal piece that holds the crown wheel in place is so graceful! It really makes one realize how much work went into these wooden movements of days long past.

    I see, too, that our friends the woodworms have demonstrated their healthy appetites while munching on the movement plates. I'm glad that here in the States we don't have to worry about those little critters too much.

    Again, Aitor, thanks for the great pictures and information! It is always so wonderful to learn from these Message Boards and to enjoy and share in the discoveries of others from all over the world!

    My very best,

    George Nelson
     
  3. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

    Oct 26, 2009
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    Many thanks, George:cool:
    There are three holes on that potence, one of them is the original bushing, but the other two were creative 'rebushings' in the past:trash:
    About woodworms, I had realized that no one of my several American woodworks movements had been eaten by wood worms (even one which had been in such a damp enviroment so as to nearly rust away most of its pivots:^) but I thought it was just a matter of careful selection of wood kinds by clockmakers. Thus, there are no wood worms in the USA? I hope that lasts for long.:)

    Aitor
     
  4. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Oct 5, 2007
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    Hi, Aitor,

    Regarding woodworms, I won't say that we do not have them here in the USA, but I will say that I have been an antiques collector since I was a young boy, (I'm 62 now), and have never come across even a hint of woodworm in any "American" antique I've ever come into contact with. This includes antiques that date to the mid 1700s. Perhaps I'm just lucky, but I have only one wood antique with woodworm evidence, and that is a German Vienna regulator clock by Gustav Becker that was purchased from a man in Poland.

    Keep finding the good stuff,

    George
     
  5. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

    Oct 26, 2009
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    Hi George, you're just six years ahead of me:cool: Fantastic to see that you keep on being so enthusiastic! That's my intention, too :clap:
    Woodworm is a fact of life here, specially if you collect Black Forest clocks, which are made of beech, pine, fir or the like...:rolleyes:
    Regards,

    Aitor
     
  6. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Oct 5, 2007
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    Hi, Aitor,

    Thanks for your comments regarding my enthusiasm! That is one of the things that I will never let age take away from me. There is still so much to learn, and I love doing so more now than ever. I was one of those oddball children that actually enjoyed going to school!

    My best to you and everyone,

    George Nelson
     
  7. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    Woodworms in America are quite rare. When I have seen them, all but once, they have been in imported furniture and imported clocks. They are not easily eliminated. I understand the best way to kill them , eggs, larva, and bug, is to freeze the piece to sub zero temps for an extended period of time, say 10-14 days. Jorgensen Antiques in Wells Maine had 2 huge walk in freezers just for this purpose back when.....other major importers have done the same or so I understand.

    Surface applied poisons are not generally effective as they don't kill the eggs or the deeply embedded larva until more damage is done, if at all then. Some people claim good success with sealing up the piece in a plastic bag with some very aggressive fog style poisons for up to 3 weeks, while others claim that by sealing the piece with a heavy application of shellac or varnish they can be suffocated...not that adding finish over other finish in antiques is generally a good idea, it is not....and I doubt that many worms can be killed in that fashion anyhow. Heat will also kill them quickly but baking out fine wood products is not a very good idea......

    The exception I came across was this piece 30+ years ago and there was sawdust on the floor under it. The owner was asking a 6 digit price for it, and was not happy with what he learned about woodworms, starting with me. They were quite active in the piece, I don't know what he did about them, this was obviously an American tiger maple piece with original surface, original brass, etc....it was living in Pennsylvania at the time I saw it, started life in Conn as I best recall. I was there to buy a clock, which I bought.
     

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  8. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

    Oct 26, 2009
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    Hello Jim,

    Surely because my freezer isn't powerful enough, I use a mixed method: First, I soak the item (usually a BF movement) in poison, then put it in a closed plastic bag and then I put the bag into the freezer, to spend there more than six months (a life cycle of those little nasty bugs) Up til now, total success Yoda
    As for this movement, it is clear that woodworms migrated in search of fresher wood to eat long ago :rolleyes:
    Anyway, woodworms are brainless, unorganized creatures, compared to termites...
    I bought some nice painted pine ceiling boards. Price was low and I went for them even if the backs exhibited signs of the 'tender mercies' of termites...

    [​IMG]
    Fortunately, the colony remained where it was, more than 600 miles far from here...:chuckling:

    Aitor
     

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  9. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Feb 19, 2005
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    Not really looking to start a big huge conversation about woodworm, but from what I've read, freezing them will not work unless the temperatures far exceed -50C (-58F) because the eggs and larva can survive the coldest of winter temperatures up to -40C. They just go into hibernation.

    I had success treating a clock case with a penetrating (glycol and borate based) insecticide. It did not damage the original finish, but it absorbs deeply into the wood (you have to inject all holes, cracks, joints, and any exposed or unfinished areas. It was very messy. Any surviving insects will die as they eat their way free.
     

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