Refurbishing to mechanical

Discussion in '400-Day & Atmos' started by Leo Blasi, Oct 24, 2019.

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  1. Leo Blasi

    Leo Blasi Registered User

    Oct 21, 2019
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    Ok, one repair down. On to the next. I was given this clock, it has been switched to battery operation and not a good quality one at that. My question is it 1)worth bringing back to mechanical or 2) is there a good battery conversion that I can install to make it look and function as it should. The case is a good heavy case with leveling feet and real glass. I think it a can be a nice clock again.
    It even has a broken suspension cable taped to the back so I am pretty sure it was once mechanical.

    1024190905.jpg 1024190906.jpg 1024190906a.jpg 1024190906b.jpg 1024190907.jpg
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    I think it was always battery powered. The pendulum does not look original to a mechanical clock, and the fit in the case is too good to be a replacement IMHO.
     
  3. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Looks original to me as well, it was battery power before, i have one too battery powered with leveling feet as well.
     
  4. Wayne A

    Wayne A Registered User

    Sep 24, 2019
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    It even has that kundo style pendulum lock, kinda odd. Saw one in a junk shop the other day that was similar, always a disappointment seeing the quartz box.
     
  5. Leo Blasi

    Leo Blasi Registered User

    Oct 21, 2019
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    I do not doubt that you are correct. My question then would be, why would someone tape a suspension cable to the back of it? I suppose only the person that did it would be able to answer that question.

    So... no reason to try to make a diamond from a lump of coal with so many diamonds in the rough available out there, correct?
     
  6. Harry Hopkins

    Harry Hopkins Registered User
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    Hello Leo and welcome, I agree with the others that the battery movement is most probably original to that case. Is it possible that the suspension spring that was taped to it was a spare for the battery movement? I cannot tell from your pictures how the pendulum hangs from the movement but most battery anniversary movements use a suspension spring similar to the mechanical movements.

    These clocks are easy to get addicted to and there are many diamonds in the rough waiting for you.
     
  7. Leo Blasi

    Leo Blasi Registered User

    Oct 21, 2019
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    Thanks Harry, The pendulum is just hanging on a piece of wire, there is no mechanism to turn the pendulum, That is one of the reasons that I was looking to change it, that and the fact that it does keep time, looses about three minutes a day, with no visible adjustment.
     
  8. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    Oct 25, 2010
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    Hi Leo,

    Perhaps you could show us the movement with the back of the clock removed.

    Here for example is and early Kundo electric (prior to quartz clocks). The pendulum hangs from a suspension wire, just like a mechanical clock, with a pin that is driven by a wide toothed wheel behind the steel plate on the back of the movement. The pendulum is the same one used on the mechanical clocks of this size.

    PB013372.JPG

    Is this what your clock is like?

    Eric
     
  9. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Here's an Elgin with a "regular" suspension spring as well. It was meant for an electric clock, though. Notice the yellow "fork" glued to the suspension wire. The fork is whacked by the white plastic wheel as it ticks around in a circle, thereby pushing on the suspension wire to rotation the pendulum.

    Kurt

    JolynnMvt.jpg
     
  10. Leo Blasi

    Leo Blasi Registered User

    Oct 21, 2019
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    Eric, my movement is exactly like the one in your picture.
    Gentlemen, I must admit that I am a little slow on the uptake. The suspension wire taped to the back of the clock is most likely the broken wire from this clock (too short and no bottom block), it was replaced with a piece of plain wire. So, I guess I need a new suspension wire or a whole new movement (since it won't keep time anyway). Short of that, I guess I have a good parts clock.
    Thanks for all your input.
     
  11. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    Oct 25, 2010
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    Hi Leo,

    Timekeeping for this movement is adjusted with the screw highlighted here:
    adjusting.jpg

    Turning the screw alters the free length of the balance spring. Turning it CCW should speed things up.

    The torsion pendulum on the clock is just for looks.

    Eric
     
  12. Leo Blasi

    Leo Blasi Registered User

    Oct 21, 2019
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    Thanks again Eric, that will make the clock functional. I, for 1, am attracted to the pendulum movement, so I'll fix it if I can.
     
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  13. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    I have the one in my collection because it represents one of the transitional designs between the full mechanical movements and the quartz clocks. I was never happy with the pendulum's behavior when I did get it going so I just locked it and let the clock run without it.

    Eric
     
  14. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Like all torsion clocks, the suspension spring has to be the correct thickness in order to function with the timed bump that keeps it swinging. If it impulses at the wrong time (due to not turning the right speed) it will stop the swing.
     
  15. MartinM

    MartinM Registered User

    Jun 24, 2011
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    And once you do find the resonant period, it'll take off like gangbusters. That's much easier said than done, though.
     
  16. Leo Blasi

    Leo Blasi Registered User

    Oct 21, 2019
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    Thanks guys, I found the right spring and got it ordered. Probably more to say that I got it working than any practical reason. But thanks to you all I learned way more on this clock that I could have imagined.
    Hopefully I will learn as much with every clock.
    Thanks again.
     

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