Recoil Escapement Adjustment

Vint

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Is it typical to have recoil strip pallet escapement problems following several pivot holes being bushed? I just finished cleaning, polishing and bushing several areas on my Ingraham and it runs nicely when I let it run without the pallet. All of the wheels and the like are true and just whrrrr! But my problem is I cant get the pallet to properly mesh with the escape wheel. I have read and followed S. Conover’s Clock Repair basics in addition to Goodman’s “This Old Clock” in detail and have everything in place. Before I start putting the pallet to the torch for adjustment purposes or move the cock to reduce the center distance I wanted to get an expert’s input.
The clock worked intermittently before I took it apart. Here are two photos. Thanks.

420B39B2-1AF0-4005-9333-E18E4F60680E.jpeg 45F4FC45-5AE9-46B2-986C-21134419A811.jpeg
 

Uhralt

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Is it typical to have recoil strip pallet escapement problems following several pivot holes being bushed? I just finished cleaning, polishing and bushing several areas on my Ingraham and it runs nicely when I let it run without the pallet. All of the wheels and the like are true and just whrrrr! But my problem is I cant get the pallet to properly mesh with the escape wheel. I have read and followed S. Conover’s Clock Repair basics in addition to Goodman’s “This Old Clock” in detail and have everything in place. Before I start putting the pallet to the torch for adjustment purposes or move the cock to reduce the center distance I wanted to get an expert’s input.
The clock worked intermittently before I took it apart. Here are two photos. Thanks.

View attachment 632496 View attachment 632497
I believe to see two things. First, the crutch seem to be bent in an 90 degree angle so that the pendulum rod has an excessive amount of play before it touches the sides of the crutch. Maybe it is just the picture that suggests this. The other is that the verge seems to be located too close to the escape wheel and needs to be moved out a bit. I does appear that the escape wheel is not released. You don't need a torch to move the verge a bit away from the escape wheel. If the clock did run before, the geometry of the verge is probably correct.

Uhralt
 

bruce linde

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Stop. Do not pass go. Please immediately take video and post it to YouTube, and then copy and paste the URL into a post here so we can watch the escapement along with you. YouTube does not care how long your video is… Let’s see it running for at least 30 seconds and/or stopping a couple of times.
 

bruce linde

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wait... i agree w uhralt... you can see in your second photo that the verge is too high and need adjusting. the crutch rod does seem overly torqued... if it were mine i wouldn’t straighten it in coordination w finding the ideal verge to EW spacing
 

Vint

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I believe to see two things. First, the crutch seem to be bent in an 90 degree angle so that the pendulum rod has an excessive amount of play before it touches the sides of the crutch. Maybe it is just the picture that suggests this. The other is that the verge seems to be located too close to the escape wheel and needs to be moved out a bit. I does appear that the escape wheel is not released. You don't need a torch to move the verge a bit away from the escape wheel. If the clock did run before, the geometry of the verge is probably correct.

Uhralt
I corrected the crutch just now. I’ve yet to adjust a strip pallet by reducing or increasing the center distance. Is this what you mean when you say the verge may be too close to the EW?
 

bruce linde

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the only verge adjustment you should be thinking about is the distance between the verge post and escape wheel arbor center... which affects how much drop and lock there is.

you should not be worried about closing or opening the verge except as a last resort.
 

Vint

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the only verge adjustment you should be thinking about is the distance between the verge post and escape wheel arbor center... which affects how much drop and lock there is.

you should not be worried about closing or opening the verge except as a last resort.
Then that is where I’ll start the adjustment. Thank you
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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As above the crutch (leader) should be rotated 90 degrees. If is is easy to do so, remove the suspension spring and the pendulum so the crutch can be operated by hand slowly and the action of the escapement can be observed.

Safely let all power off the mainsprings. Apply finger pressure to one of the gear wheels in the normal direction of rotation.

Use low-power magnification if needed to observe the action of the escapement.

at this stage, the escapement will be in one of the following three states.
  • working
  • locked
  • escape wheel spinning freely

  • If the escapement is working, gradually decrease the centre distance between the escape wheel and the pallet arbor by tiny amounts until the escapement stops ticking and locks. Now very slightly increase the centre distance until the escapement only just begins to operate.
  • If the escapement is locked, gradually increase the centre distance between the escape wheel and the pallet arbor by tiny amounts until the escapement begins to operate (tick).
  • If the escape wheel is running free, gradually decrease the centre distance between the escape wheel and the pallet arbor by tiny amounts until first the escapement begins to tick and then locks. Now very slightly increase the centre distance until the escapement only just begins to operate.

The escapement is in its best state of adjustment when it is only just ticking i.e. slightly greater centre distance than the locked position.

If the "drops" (free) rotation of the escape wheel are wildly different, yo may have to adjust internal drop. As above, a total last resort. Can cover that later...

The above and the good advice in other posts should get you ticking.

Re-fit the pendulum and turn the crutch through 90 degrees.

Hope this helps.

PS. Spinning the wheels as you describe under power doesnt alas tell you that much. Your re-bushed mobiles should drop totally freely from shoulder to shoulder when the frame is inverted 9when all the power is off of course). If they don't. Go back to that first and check for uprighting issues and de-burr all the new holes on the inside of the plate...

Good luck! Yes a video with the escapement operated by hand i.e. slowly would be really useful.
 

bikerclockguy

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I enlarged your photo, and have a couple more things to add. Your escape wheel dog bones are SERIOUSLY wallowed out. I would fix that before moving the verge. Also, it may be just a trick of the light, but looks like your escape wheel is missing a tooth? 28E40B07-0582-4F4F-BFD4-9BF1E605D099.jpeg
 

Vint

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As above the crutch (leader) should be rotated 90 degrees. If is is easy to do so, remove the suspension spring and the pendulum so the crutch can be operated by hand slowly and the action of the escapement can be observed.

Safely let all power off the mainsprings. Apply finger pressure to one of the gear wheels in the normal direction of rotation.

Use low-power magnification if needed to observe the action of the escapement.

at this stage, the escapement will be in one of the following three states.
  • working
  • locked
  • escape wheel spinning freely

  • If the escapement is working, gradually decrease the centre distance between the escape wheel and the pallet arbor by tiny amounts until the escapement stops ticking and locks. Now very slightly increase the centre distance until the escapement only just begins to operate.
  • If the escapement is locked, gradually increase the centre distance between the escape wheel and the pallet arbor by tiny amounts until the escapement begins to operate (tick).
  • If the escape wheel is running free, gradually decrease the centre distance between the escape wheel and the pallet arbor by tiny amounts until first the escapement begins to tick and then locks. Now very slightly increase the centre distance until the escapement only just begins to operate.

The escapement is in its best state of adjustment when it is only just ticking i.e. slightly greater centre distance than the locked position.

If the "drops" (free) rotation of the escape wheel are wildly different, yo may have to adjust internal drop. As above, a total last resort. Can cover that later...

The above and the good advice in other posts should get you ticking.

Re-fit the pendulum and turn the crutch through 90 degrees.

Hope this helps.

PS. Spinning the wheels as you describe under power doesnt alas tell you that much. Your re-bushed mobiles should drop totally freely from shoulder to shoulder when the frame is inverted 9when all the power is off of course). If they don't. Go back to that first and check for uprighting issues and de-burr all the new holes on the inside of the plate...

Good luck! Yes a video with the escapement operated by hand i.e. slowly would be really useful.
This is so helpful. I’ll send a video. Thanks
 

Vint

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I enlarged your photo, and have a couple more things to add. Your escape wheel dog bones are SERIOUSLY wallowed out. I would fix that before moving the verge. Also, it may be just a trick of the light, but looks like your escape wheel is missing a tooth? View attachment 632532
I went ahead and bushed the escape dogbone and it spins nicely. No teeth missing just a bad reflection. Sorry about that. Thanks bikerclockguy!
 

shutterbug

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I can see that your verge is barely unlocking if at all. I think you'll have to do a couple of things at least: one, increase the angle of the entrance pallet a bit. Second, make the exit pallet angle 90°. It looks a bit wide now. You could just bend the center of the verge to decrease the length of the verge, and that might be enough. Usually only the pallets themselves have been hardened.
 

Vint

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You’re welcome! Is it ticking now?
It’s not. I have the entry and exit pallet almost equal in drop but it won’t tick or tock. This is my first clock to bush and everything seems to work well. I very carefully adjusted the pallet using the riveted cock and it helped. How should the pallets be touching the EW before I focus on setting the beat? I’ve attached a pic to show what I’ve done.

52AB76E8-9966-45AD-9B10-B63D1CC35F89.jpeg
 

bikerclockguy

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It’s not. I have the entry and exit pallet almost equal in drop but it won’t tick or tock. This is my first clock to bush and everything seems to work well. I very carefully adjusted the pallet using the riveted cock and it helped. How should the pallets be touching the EW before I focus on setting the beat? I’ve attached a pic to show what I’ve done.

View attachment 632689
I thought you fixed the dogbone? Still looks the same in this last pic, and that’s a lot of vertical play.
 

Vint

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I thought you fixed the dogbone? Still looks the same in this last pic, and that’s a lot of vertical play.
it looks that way due to that half moon mark stamp below the pivot on the plate. I have several of these markings on the plate. It doesn’t have any wobble.
 

bikerclockguy

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it looks that way due to that half moon mark stamp below the pivot on the plate. I have several of these markings on the plate. It doesn’t have any wobble.
Oh, okay, I thought that was empty space. Sorry, my mistake!
 

Vint

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As above the crutch (leader) should be rotated 90 degrees. If is is easy to do so, remove the suspension spring and the pendulum so the crutch can be operated by hand slowly and the action of the escapement can be observed.

Safely let all power off the mainsprings. Apply finger pressure to one of the gear wheels in the normal direction of rotation.

Use low-power magnification if needed to observe the action of the escapement.

at this stage, the escapement will be in one of the following three states.
  • working
  • locked
  • escape wheel spinning freely

  • If the escapement is working, gradually decrease the centre distance between the escape wheel and the pallet arbor by tiny amounts until the escapement stops ticking and locks. Now very slightly increase the centre distance until the escapement only just begins to operate.
  • If the escapement is locked, gradually increase the centre distance between the escape wheel and the pallet arbor by tiny amounts until the escapement begins to operate (tick).
  • If the escape wheel is running free, gradually decrease the centre distance between the escape wheel and the pallet arbor by tiny amounts until first the escapement begins to tick and then locks. Now very slightly increase the centre distance until the escapement only just begins to operate.

The escapement is in its best state of adjustment when it is only just ticking i.e. slightly greater centre distance than the locked position.

If the "drops" (free) rotation of the escape wheel are wildly different, yo may have to adjust internal drop. As above, a total last resort. Can cover that later...

The above and the good advice in other posts should get you ticking.

Re-fit the pendulum and turn the crutch through 90 degrees.

Hope this helps.

PS. Spinning the wheels as you describe under power doesnt alas tell you that much. Your re-bushed mobiles should drop totally freely from shoulder to shoulder when the frame is inverted 9when all the power is off of course). If they don't. Go back to that first and check for uprighting issues and de-burr all the new holes on the inside of the plate...

Good luck! Yes a video with the escapement operated by hand i.e. slowly would be really useful.
 

Vint

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I’ve spent the entire morning trying to get the escapement working. I was able to very carefully increase the center distance in addition to adjusting the crutch to the degree that the escape wheel now barely touches the pallets. Still no tick. There is a little play in the bushing I installed in the dog bone....but it is hardly noticeable. I actually had the old Ingraham working before I replaced the loop mainsprings and disassembled the movement. The dogbone pivot hole was pear shaped and yet it worked somewhat. Not sure what to do next.
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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Ok. were the mainsprings broken? If not, I'd consider re-installing if you still have them. f you have problems with depthing (transmission of power between mobiles), stronger springs may make it worse.

May take some time but completely disassemble the movement. If you haven't already. try all the mobiles in the frame individually, especially the ones you have bushed. Check that they rotate totally freely and when the frame is inverted, the mobiles drop freely from shoulder to shoulder. If there is any hesitancy, first check the uprighting of the hole i.e. is the arbor able to move past the 90 degree position (the five degree rule of thumb only works if the middle of that five degrees is perpendicular to the plate and in-line with the opposite pivot hole. Make sure all the holes you have re-bushed are de-burred. Take some 0000 (4 0s) grade steel wool and tapered peg-wood and de-burr the holes. (you will need to wash the clock again and peg-out after). Once you are convinced all the mobiles are totally free individually, try them in pairs, working up from the bottom of the train. Do not just spin the wheels, this doesn't mean much, try them under load for smoothness. None will be perfectly smooth but any that feel particularly inconsistent in transmission of power... Q. are these the ones you bushed? Again, once you are convinced the entire train is free, and with only a tiny bit of power on the mainspring the train operates in both dial-up and dial-down positions, it is time to return to the escapement...

Is the pallet frame totally free on its pivot?

Do you know whether the pallet frame has already been bent i.e. has the distance between the entry and the exit pallet frame been altered? If you think it has, the pallets need to span n 1/2 tooth spaces between the drop off point and the point at which the escape wheel tooth lands on the opposite pallet. that is the next thing to figure out before doing any bending. Unless the pallets have been altered a lot, I'd really look long and hard at bushings, particularly the ones you have done for uprighting and de-burring.

Hope this helps.
 

shutterbug

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I think a good place to start is taking the verge/anchor clear off and see how much power you are actually getting to the escape wheel. You should be able to stop and start it several times by using your thumb. It should have a good snap to action every time you release it. Any hesitation there is an indication that you have a power transmission problem. That will also help us to know where to focus our attention as we try to help ;)
 

Vint

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Ok. were the mainsprings broken? If not, I'd consider re-installing if you still have them. f you have problems with depthing (transmission of power between mobiles), stronger springs may make it worse.

May take some time but completely disassemble the movement. If you haven't already. try all the mobiles in the frame individually, especially the ones you have bushed. Check that they rotate totally freely and when the frame is inverted, the mobiles drop freely from shoulder to shoulder. If there is any hesitancy, first check the uprighting of the hole i.e. is the arbor able to move past the 90 degree position (the five degree rule of thumb only works if the middle of that five degrees is perpendicular to the plate and in-line with the opposite pivot hole. Make sure all the holes you have re-bushed are de-burred. Take some 0000 (4 0s) grade steel wool and tapered peg-wood and de-burr the holes. (you will need to wash the clock again and peg-out after). Once you are convinced all the mobiles are totally free individually, try them in pairs, working up from the bottom of the train. Do not just spin the wheels, this doesn't mean much, try them under load for smoothness. None will be perfectly smooth but any that feel particularly inconsistent in transmission of power... Q. are these the ones you bushed? Again, once you are convinced the entire train is free, and with only a tiny bit of power on the mainspring the train operates in both dial-up and dial-down positions, it is time to return to the escapement...

Is the pallet frame totally free on its pivot?

Do you know whether the pallet frame has already been bent i.e. has the distance between the entry and the exit pallet frame been altered? If you think it has, the pallets need to span n 1/2 tooth spaces between the drop off point and the point at which the escape wheel tooth lands on the opposite pallet. that is the next thing to figure out before doing any bending. Unless the pallets have been altered a lot, I'd really look long and hard at bushings, particularly the ones you have done for uprighting and de-burring.

Hope this helps.
It does help and it looks like I need to disassemble again and follow your suggestions. The pallet frame isn’t bent but this practice is good for me as I really enjoy learning about these type of clock movements etc. If you don’t mind I’d like to keep you apprised of my progress maybe via a conversation on this forum. Thanks again.
 

bikerclockguy

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It does help and it looks like I need to disassemble again and follow your suggestions. The pallet frame isn’t bent but this practice is good for me as I really enjoy learning about these type of clock movements etc. If you don’t mind I’d like to keep you apprised of my progress maybe via a conversation on this forum. Thanks again.
If you reinstall the old mainsprings, clean and lubricate them first. Use mineral spirits to clean the old ones. I clean mine by sticking a Phillips screwdriver through the inner coil and then clamping the screwdriver in a bench vise. Pour some mineral spirits on an old t-shirt, and work your way down the spring, wiping both sides as you go. You won’t be able to get the last couple of inner coils, but stretch it out as far as you can without boogering it up(you’ll be able to tell by the feel when you get to that point). Then use the same method(I just smear the oil on with my fingers and don’t use a t-shirt for that part)to apply your lubricant. There are a zillion lubes and schools of thought on this, but motor oil will work just fine in a pinch. Get a nice even coat on the spring, put it back on the wheel, and wind it as tight as it will go. Wipe off the excess and you’re ready to install it. I have to give Bangster credit for this method, as I learned it from him, and it’s easy to do and works well.
 

Vint

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If you reinstall the old mainsprings, clean and lubricate them first. Use mineral spirits to clean the old ones. I clean mine by sticking a Phillips screwdriver through the inner coil and then clamping the screwdriver in a bench vise. Pour some mineral spirits on an old t-shirt, and work your way down the spring, wiping both sides as you go. You won’t be able to get the last couple of inner coils, but stretch it out as far as you can without boogering it up(you’ll be able to tell by the feel when you get to that point). Then use the same method(I just smear the oil on with my fingers and don’t use a t-shirt for that part)to apply your lubricant. There are a zillion lubes and schools of thought on this, but motor oil will work just fine in a pinch. Get a nice even coat on the spring, put it back on the wheel, and wind it as tight as it will go. Wipe off the excess and you’re ready to install it. I have to give Bangster credit for this method, as I learned it from him, and it’s easy to do and works well.
I looked at both springs and they are really set. However, I actually got the EW to unlock and work with the pallet for a very brief time. It appears many of the teeth on the EW are in bad condition..I removed the suspension spring and pendulum and was turning the EW with my finger and found a couple of teeth twisted, and one badly worn. So, at what point does one replace the EW? How many times can an EW be “repaired”?
 

Vint

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It does help and it looks like I need to disassemble again and follow your suggestions. The pallet frame isn’t bent but this practice is good for me as I really enjoy learning about these type of clock movements etc. If you don’t mind I’d like to keep you apprised of my progress maybe via a conversation on this forum. Thanks again.
At what point is it necessary to replace the EW? How many times can the teeth on a EW be straightened out, repaired etc? Using 10x magnification I was able to identify a couple of teeth that are stopping the entry pallet as I turn the EW wheel without power. one tooth is badly worn and twisted.
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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There is no limit per-se how many times you can repair the wheel. Obviously there are practical considerations. As the wheel wears it gets fractionally smaller in diameter. Together with pallet face wear, this increases "drop" or free rotation of the escape wheel between phases of impulse, depriving the pendulum of impulse. In theory, the pallets can either be re-faced or adjusted to reduce drop. The problem with bending the pallets is you change their geometry. I think it is a good learning curve to try fix the wheel at least first. Straighten any bent teeth by drawing them out with a pair of smooth jawed pliers or strong brass tweezers. Try to avoid making the teeth longer in this process. You can use a plastic circle drawing gauge to check for long teeth and reduce length (height) if necessary by filing TINY amounts. If you file-up a piece of brass to fit as a gauge between "good" teeth, you can use this to check any teeth that have been straightened. Remember, it is only the tips of the teeth that are active, effectively points in space, the escapement doesnt care what the rest looks like as long as there is consistent pitch, the wheel is round and concentric! Bit of a job but satisfying if you can get the better of it. Remember your pallets span n 1/2 teeth between dropping off point and landing point of wheel teeth. Drop outside the pallets (external drop) and drop inside the pallets should be equal. Hope this helps!
 

Vint

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There is no limit per-se how many times you can repair the wheel. Obviously there are practical considerations. As the wheel wears it gets fractionally smaller in diameter. Together with pallet face wear, this increases "drop" or free rotation of the escape wheel between phases of impulse, depriving the pendulum of impulse. In theory, the pallets can either be re-faced or adjusted to reduce drop. The problem with bending the pallets is you change their geometry. I think it is a good learning curve to try fix the wheel at least first. Straighten any bent teeth by drawing them out with a pair of smooth jawed pliers or strong brass tweezers. Try to avoid making the teeth longer in this process. You can use a plastic circle drawing gauge to check for long teeth and reduce length (height) if necessary by filing TINY amounts. If you file-up a piece of brass to fit as a gauge between "good" teeth, you can use this to check any teeth that have been straightened. Remember, it is only the tips of the teeth that are active, effectively points in space, the escapement doesnt care what the rest looks like as long as there is consistent pitch, the wheel is round and concentric! Bit of a job but satisfying if you can get the better of it. Remember your pallets span n 1/2 teeth between dropping off point and landing point of wheel teeth. Drop outside the pallets (external drop) and drop inside the pallets should be equal. Hope this helps!
After reading your message I came to the realization that I’ve given very little attention to the EW. In addition to the teeth needing help I also see that the wheel wobbles and the pivot is slightly bent that goes into the dog bone. I had no idea how important it is to look carefully at the escapement. Any advice on how to straighten the pivot? I can’t tell you how helpful your information has been to me.
 

shutterbug

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A small hollow punch works to straighten pivots. A bench block with holes can also be used. Often trying to straighten them results in breaking them off, but it's always worth a try.
 

Vint

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A small hollow punch works to straighten pivots. A bench block with holes can also be used. Often trying to straighten them results in breaking them off, but it's always worth a try.
I understand the potential for breakage after reading a few posts about bent pivots. My pivot is hardly noticeable but it’s bent just as well. I appreciate your feedback. Thnx
 

Vint

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I think a good place to start is taking the verge/anchor clear off and see how much power you are actually getting to the escape wheel. You should be able to stop and start it several times by using your thumb. It should have a good snap to action every time you release it. Any hesitation there is an indication that you have a power transmission problem. That will also help us to know where to focus our attention as we try to help ;)
I have adjusted the dogbone just enough so that the drop for both entry and exit are equal. Upon checking power transmission it is good. 55BAD2E6-FA6A-46D5-885F-E5FC7171A03E.jpeg
I think a good place to start is taking the verge/anchor clear off and see how much power you are actually getting to the escape wheel. You should be able to stop and start it several times by using your thumb. It should have a good snap to action every time you release it. Any hesitation there is an indication that you have a power transmission problem. That will also help us to know where to focus our attention as we try to help ;)
Checked transmission of power and all good. I’ve painstakingly finally got the entrance and exit pallet drop equal (pic is misleading but teeth are equal spaced on pallets).
What is my next move to get the tick working?
 

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In the most recent photo, the S shape of the crutch rod is not one I have ever seen before. Not sure it would cause any problem, but sure makes me wonder.
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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cool. the S shaped crutch shouldn't make much difference as long as it is not binding on anything. If you have a smartphone, could you post a slo-mo video here or on YouTube so we can see what is going on? Does the escape wheel spin freely when there is power on the train and the pallets removed?
 

shutterbug

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I don't like the angle of the entrance pallet. It should be a bit steeper than that. It doesn't appear from the photo that you are getting much lock. Another 1/2mm of length would help. Adjusting the entrance pallet might be enough too. You need to get the verge closer to the wheel, and without altering the verge that is not going to happen.
You need to move the crutch back and forth slowly by hand and watch what happens to the escape wheel. You should see good recoil on the entrance (it should back up a half tooth distance) and a little less on the exit. Unless it's able to go deep into the teeth you won't get much recoil, and without that the clock can't run.
Be careful when trying to bend things. Anneal with heat first, bend, test, polish, harden again.
 
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Vint

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As an aside note, I have made sure the EW teeth are true and in good condition. I have increased and decreased the dogbone and even after having equal drop on both pallets, still can’t get a tick. I hope the slo mo pic helps my plight.
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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Ok, the video is really useful. Sorry this is so difficult to get working. I'll have another look but it appears you pallets span more than n 1/2 teeth (I think it is 8 1/2? but cannot count from the video). It doesnt matter, it is the half that matters. As your entry pallet 'attempts' to leave the active escape wheel tooth, the exit pallet is already in place i.e. you have two teeth touching the escape wheel at once. You should only ever have one active tooth, the action being separated by drop. Can someone on this forum tell us how many teeth the pallets should span i.e. do your pallets need opening or closing? Once you have that info, decision needs to be made as to whether the pallets are hardened and will break if you attempt to bend... What's the consensus?
 

shutterbug

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The number of teeth spanned is not super critical, but as howto said, your verge is not unlocking. I see two things that I would do. I would bend the entrance pallet to a more proper angle - at least 1/3 more than it is. Then I would increase the exit pallet angle to 90°, which is normal. There is no other adjustment that is going to help ;)
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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I've attached some images that I hope might help. I think the aim, at least in the first place, it to get the escapement ticking. I would say worry about the angles once it is running, even if it is running on tea-cakes to begin with... a confidence building exercise. The sketches below are not exactly like your escapement but close enough to figure it out I hope. The pallets drawn embrace 6 1/2 tooth spaces. as above, the number isn't important but the 1/2 is. Iof you think of it, the escape wheel advances half a tooth per "tick" or "tock" of the escapement. if for some reason the pallets have been open or closed and they pan more than n 1/2 or less, there will be massive drops on one "ticK" and the pallets will jam on the other. There is never more than one active escape wheel tooth at any one time, they are separated by a tiny gap called "drop". when a pallet nib is at the end of an escape wheel tooth like 2, the other pallet nib should be free, with drop between it and the next active tooth. This is exactly the same when the tooth leaves the exit pallet and the next active tooth lands on the entry pallet. Only ever one active tooth. it may help to imagine that your escape wheel has only one tooth, that's all it needs! :=) Because you can slide your pallets of their arbor, if you do that and allow the escape wheel to rotate fractionally and slide them back on, you will find the escapement works for one "tick" only then jams again. By doing this, you should be able to figure out whether you have n1/2 (plus) or n 1/2 (minus). Then you can decide on adjustment... Listening to what shutterbug has to say, if the exit pallet on these clocks is normally 90 degrees or thereabouts, it looks like you have significantly more than n 1/2 teeth spaces embraced. If the pallet frame is not hardened and you feel confident to bend the exit pallet in, very gradually towards 90 degrees, at some point the escapement will work. It has to! There is a risk with this that the pallet frame will break. If you have a small gas torch, very slowly heat the knuckles the exit pallet until the steel turns blue. Do this slowly and it will decrease the chance of breakage but not eliminate. Can someone else on this forum tell Vint how many tooth spaces his escapement is meant to span? Hope this helps!

1.jpg 2.jpg 3.jpg 4.jpg 5.jpg 6.jpg 7.jpg
 

Vint

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The number of teeth spanned is not super critical, but as howto said, your verge is not unlocking. I see two things that I would do. I would bend the entrance pallet to a more proper angle - at least 1/3 more than it is. Then I would increase the exit pallet angle to 90°, which is normal. There is no other adjustment that is going to help ;)
When you say “proper angle” for the entrance pallet is that opening it more or closing it more?
 

Vint

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The pallets are not hardened and easily show a scratch. I really appreciate the information which I’m going to slowly review. The diagrams are helpful. Thanks again. I’ll keep you posted.
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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Re the "proper angle", I'm not that familiar with these clocks. maybe if someone has one that works they can send you an image. I suspect it is closing the pallets by bending the exit pallet closer and incrementally to 90 degrees.
 

shutterbug

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Yes. Change the exit to 90 degrees and bend the entrance pallet to a little steeper curve. Doing both will decrease the number of teeth the verge is trying to interact with. As was explained above, you want 1/2 tooth of empty space on both pallets when the verge is active. It will also give you more recoil, which is what imparts momentum to the pendulum.
When you get it working right, those pallet ends should be hardened.
 

howtorepairpendulumclocks

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Thanks shutterbug. How many tooth spaces do these escapements normally embrace? 7 1/2? Looking at earlier images, it looks like these pallets are spanning about 8 1/4 tooth spaces, ergo exit pallet in particular needs bending towards the entry pallet by about half a tooth space...?
 

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