Recognize this kind of plug

RickScheflen

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May 23, 2023
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A friend of mine has an old electric mantel clock but does not have the cord to plug it in. Does anyone recognize this kind of connector? Any help you can provide is appreciated.

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Tim Orr

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Good afternoon, Rick!

I feel certain this is a garden variety 110v AC connector. The prongs sticking out are similar to the prongs on a plug you stick into a wall socket, and would mate with a "socket" on the end of a power cord. Not sure where you'd find one these days, but you might be able to rig something up.

Might want to remove completely and install a proper, modern cord and strain-relief. You can even get fancy and make it a 3-wire with a ground connection (if you can find a metal part of the clock motor to attach the ground wire to).

I don't think you're going to find anything "off the shelf," but you might eventually go through enough thrift store bins until you find something close enough. Before you go, be sure to measure the length, thickness, width of the prongs and distance between them.

Best regards!

Tim Orr
 

RickScheflen

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Thank you for the quick response, Tim. I don't feel qualified to rework the wiring, so I will check out thrift stores and clock shops to see if I can find the proper connecting wire. Hopefully, someone else will respond to this and be able to direct me to a source.

In the meantime, I will see if these prongs can plug into a garden variety AC connector.

Many thanks!
 

TQ60

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Zooming in, it looks to be female and 250 volt.

Photos of the rest of it?

My guess is this is a controlled OUTPUT.

Maybe the clock controlled something, connector rating is 5 amps 250 volts.
 

Tim Orr

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Good evening, all!

Connector ratings are often specified according to maximums, in this case, 250 volts. Not likely that this is actually a 250 volt clock.

I also doubt that a mantel clock would have an external output. At first, I thought the connector was female, but the angle is so straight-on that I am betting we are seeing the ends of the prongs and it is, in fact, male, rather than female. Rick can confirm or disconfirm that.

Also, a power connection would not have a female connector because that would necessitate the power cord having male connectors, which is inherently dangerous.

Best regards!

Tim Orr
 

EscapeWheel

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This website has something they call a tv power supply cheater cord. They show two different ones (about half-way down the page) - one is male, one female. Not sure if the size is right but they have measurements.

 

demoman3955

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skruft

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This is an input that I have seen on various brands of older clocks. I have never seen a source for new ones that are small enough. Many clocks have been crudely converted to eliminate this, like by tying a knot inside. I am sure something nicer could be made, but it would not be authentic.
 

Richard.W

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This is an input that I have seen on various brands of older clocks. I have never seen a source for new ones that are small enough.
The issue is that this pressed steel plug pre-dates Underwriters Laboratories. All electrical devices sold in the US must now comply with UL standards, and UL's idea of safe distances to metal surfaces and human fingers is quite a bit more than that used during the 1930's and 40's. So these in-line receptacles are sold, but modern versions are quite a bit larger.

I suggest you go buy a modern version in-line connector, harvest the 2 connector contacts from the plastic body, and then 1) cover those in heat shrink tubing, or 2) fabricate your own older style connector housing using 3D printing.
 

Steve Neul

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May 11, 2023
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Is there any holes in the case were a wire could be inserted. The receptical shown would be for outgoing power like you were going to plug a lamp into the clock. Very likely there was a wire with a plug wired directly to the clocks motor or switch if it has one.

Back when the clock was made wiring only consisted of two wires. One for power and one for the neutral wire and it didn't matter which one was which when hooking it up. You just had to insure the wires didn't touch each other.
 

MartinM

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I get a 6 foot non polarized extension cord on ebay and introduce it to my belt grinder.
 

davefr

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That looks like the male connector used on early GE/Telechron clock cases. The female end for the cord will be every hard to find. I'd suggest using a couple insulated female spade connectors crimped to your choice of cord. (much safer)


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