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19th c Rebuilding Woodwork Movements

Gerard

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Nov 2, 2017
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I am a totally amateur horologist and I thought I would share the success I've had rebuilding old 30-hour wooden movements. Pictured are two clocks I have done. Both were non-running examples of Terry-type movements from the early 1800s. The Marsh & Gilbert is featured in four photos because I just finished it up today and had it apart. The other is an Atkins & Downs. In both cases, earlier horologists had added little bits of metal to tighten up the movements (as can be seen on the strike side of the Gilbert. The time side had the same arrangement and was not running. The strike side was running so I left it alone. It seems strike sides are far less likely to lose enough power through wear to stop working.) In both cases I disassembled the movements, repaired any missing teeth, removed all bits of aftermarket metal and drilled out all the spindle holes in the plates. Then I made bushings from a small piece of Lignum Vitae I found online. Lignum Vitae is one of the hardest woods on the planet. At the same time, it is very oily, so it offers a great deal of self lubrication. I press fit the bushings into the plates and drilled the proper size holes for the spindles. Slightly polished all the spindles, adjusted flywheel tension, lined up all stops and levers, re-assembled and voila. I'm two-for-two in getting these old clocks running this way. The Atkins has been running for two years now with no hiccups. Hoping for the same level of performance from the Gilbert. But frankly, I am 63 and I'm fairly confident both of these clocks will be running long after I am. I love how the original maker signed the back of the Gilbert movement and dated it 1820 with what appears to be a quill pen. Sorry for the long post but just wanted to share.

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Robbie Pridgen

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Aug 18, 2019
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Raleigh
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I am a totally amateur horologist and I thought I would share the success I've had rebuilding old 30-hour wooden movements. Pictured are two clocks I have done. Both were non-running examples of Terry-type movements from the early 1800s. The Marsh & Gilbert is featured in four photos because I just finished it up today and had it apart. The other is an Atkins & Downs. In both cases, earlier horologists had added little bits of metal to tighten up the movements (as can be seen on the strike side of the Gilbert. The time side had the same arrangement and was not running. The strike side was running so I left it alone. It seems strike sides are far less likely to lose enough power through wear to stop working.) In both cases I disassembled the movements, repaired any missing teeth, removed all bits of aftermarket metal and drilled out all the spindle holes in the plates. Then I made bushings from a small piece of Lignum Vitae I found online. Lignum Vitae is one of the hardest woods on the planet. At the same time, it is very oily, so it offers a great deal of self lubrication. I press fit the bushings into the plates and drilled the proper size holes for the spindles. Slightly polished all the spindles, adjusted flywheel tension, lined up all stops and levers, re-assembled and voila. I'm two-for-two in getting these old clocks running this way. The Atkins has been running for two years now with no hiccups. Hoping for the same level of performance from the Gilbert. But frankly, I am 63 and I'm fairly confident both of these clocks will be running long after I am. I love how the original maker signed the back of the Gilbert movement and dated it 1820 with what appears to be a quill pen. Sorry for the long post but just wanted to share.

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GREAT JOB on two beautiful clocks!! You have reason to be proud! Robbie
 

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