Realistic selection of a lathe

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by ChrisCam, Jan 4, 2019.

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  1. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Whoops just being looking at old posts so sorry no consensus there is equally split opinion on the Rollimat's justification. Being cynical one might be tempted to say you probably do not need either a lathe or a Rollimat. It comes down to weighing up the time saved and better results (if any) against the costs. Apparently many pivots are OK as they are and there are dangers with a lathe as with the Rollimat. I revert therefore to Mark Kinsler's post whereby honing your hand skills first is the way forward and once learned you will be in a much better place to judge the justification for tool acquisition.
     
  2. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Sorry but yes it is confusing so many different views from people with so much experience: guilty as charged

    Regards

    Chris
     
  3. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Chris lots of diversity here. Be sure to read Jerry's post #45.

    I live in a small town in Canada. If I need some part or tool, it is minimum $30 and at least one week wait, coming across the border can have its own challenges.

    I have decided that the service I provide is to repair and keep as much of the original as possible and to make parts if necessary. I don't have a supply of old movements and don't spend my time camping out on Ebay looking for them. So for my service a lathe and mill is necessary.

    One of the things that hasn't been mentioned much is the fabrication of special tools for clock repair, or just making accessories that one could purchase, such as slitting saw mandrels. I have a staking set but I often find that I have to make some sort of special punch or hollow punch to make a repair easier / safer.

    Here is just a sampling of some of the tools I have made over the years as challenges arise.

    assortment of stuff made on the lathe.jpg and with the mill full selection of stuff.jpg

    Just adding more for your consideration and confusion ?

    David
     
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  4. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    See Jerry's list in post #45 for starters. Add bushing spring barrels, truing out of round wheels, repointing balance staff, and more. Last week I had to change an escape wheel to a different number of teeth for someone who required a shorter pendulum length. The new wheel's hub didn't fit the arbor and the original hub bid to fit the wheel - easily corrected with the lathe. Not to mention that it makes a decent pivot polishing setup. Last spring I made a new bearing for the electric motor that runs the little pump on my solar water heater. Bottom lime, you can do more work and do better work if you have a lathe and learn how to use it.

    RC
     
  5. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks David, I fully recognise the value a lathe has in giving flexibility in making tools. I fully accept a lathe is not an essential tool but nice to have and know how to operate. I also fully understand every human being is entitled to their own perceptions which means we end up with conflicting views and therefore no one is right or wrong in the binary sense. It becomes a judgment for the inexperienced based on conflicting advise taking account of factors such as availability of cash and expected use. At this point in time I am confused but will chew the cud for a few days. At least if I go the Sherline route the initial cost is not prohibitive and it will keep me quiet whilst learning new skills and if I do this at least I will now know the realistic expectation in use which we can hopefully agree on will not be a heavy reliance.

    Regards

    Chris
     
  6. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    I'm with Mark on the 95% figure.

    And, if you have ever been in business, you will understand that making parts will ocasionally be necessary. But also, making parts takes expensive machinery and a lot of time, time that could be better spent on other work. So, if you are in the business of clock repair, your best path is to send specialized work out. IMOE one person trying to do everything that comes up in a clock repair shop can be counter productive, money wise.

    For a hobbyist, or for folks that see clocks as an opportunity to use machine tools, the priority list would be different.

    Lathe owner/operator since 1969,
    Willie X
     
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  7. Vernon

    Vernon Registered User
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    Chris,
    I just noticed that you are in England. Maybe there is a hands on clock repair course/workshop that features the lathe like we have with our NAWCC to help with your decision and gain some experience. In this way, you will better understand to move forward confidently. I am self taught but took a course a couple of years ago and plan on another so that I can add skills and build confidence.
    For me, when I was making the decision of which lathe, it became important that I could get new and that it was supported. Back then, Taig was the brand that was being sold by the suppliers and Sherline was just entering. I never liked the finish on the Taig so resisted. I then came across good deal on a jewelers lathe and used that while I watched the Sherline mature. I now have the Sherline lathe and recently the mill and am very happy with my decision. Ultimately, you will decide how much expense and time you want to put into your hobby. Your tool choices will limit what you can do so make sure that you are honest with yourself. Know what you want from your tools and your hobby.
     
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  8. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Good point about Chris' location. I am surprised that Shimmystep hasn't posted on this thread.

    David
     
  9. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    You can't go wrong with the thinking in post #51.

    Many people think that the craft/art of clock repair starts with a fully equipped shop. Nothing could be furthur from the truth. It starts with a dream and a fair number of good hand tools. Ha

    Willie X
     
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  10. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    Chris
    Should be a fairly easy decision base on this discussion.

    Carefully evaluate the way those that use a lathe and those that do not, perform their repairs.

    Jerry Kieffer
     
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  11. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    I don't know exactly what jerry means but I think many will take it as an insult or maybe just snobery. Ha. Willie X
     
  12. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Last time I commented on what I thought was perhaps not appropriate in one of Jerry's comments, I apparently didn't appreciate his sense of humour. So decided to pass on this latest comment.

    David
     
  13. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    Hey Willie

    I have learned that you can not please everyone and trying has been fruitless.

    In this case, evaluating readily available discussions is one method of determining if a Lathe will provide the capabilities one would like to have. No more and no less.



    Jerry Kieffer
     
  14. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    That sounds right. I took a damaged barrel to my local clock repair shop and they told me they could not do the work. I don't think they have a lathe on the premises either, but they do have a pivot polishing machine. They also do a lot of business.

    For me it's a hobby.
    Eric
     
  15. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Jerry,

    This works for me!

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  16. Coalbuster

    Coalbuster Registered User

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    Basically, you can use hand tools to make everything a machine can except money. A professional can't be messing around with the "art" of the process and expect to make a profit. Bite the bullet and buy the machines that you need.

    As for the original question, I use a jewelers lathe with a full set of collets for small stuff and my 10" Logan for most everything else. But I only fix clocks as a hobby. If I were looking to make money at it, the Sherline looks like a great starting point.
     
  17. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    But it's important to have some metalworking skills prior to buying machine tools, and it wasn't clear that the original poster of this thread had any shop skills at all.

    In US public schools shop classes have been extinct for many years (someone might get hurt, and I want my son to be an executive.) But young people read the Internet, including discussion groups like this one, and are enthusiastic.

    The same was true years ago at rec.crafts.metalworking, where we'd often get what-lathe-should-I-buy-so-I-can-build-a-steam-engine questions from people utterly unfamiliar with, say, wrenches. They were convinced that you just need a lathe to build neat things and rather shocked at my mention of cold-chisels and files.

    Most of us here are fairly handy at building and repairing just about anything, having learned the art and mystery of shop work from fathers who were handy themselves, or in shop class, or elsewhere at a fairly early age. But many kids nowadays had no such advantages, and it's important for us to keep that in mind as we issue advice.

    Mark Kinsler
     
  18. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    As I have stated both sides of the argument have obvious merits. I have decided to go for a Sherline 17 inch with some mentioned addons. Having done a fair bit of hand metal work and have very good craft and d.i.y skills I feel learning to use a lathe is certainly a challenge but certainly doable. Your advice along with Willie's is very true up to a point.and I note both of you have a lathe so even if not used weekly it would still be a valuable set of skills to have for odd jobs and tool making and possibly pivot polishing. Justification is not really on financial consideration if I was a young man possibly it would be but more what I would like to have at my potential use and skill set and there is always in the back of my mind desire in my mind for that extra tool so whether it's a head or heart decision thank you everyone for your advise and a Sherline lathe it shall be.

    Many thanks to all that posted.

    Chris
     
  19. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Hi Can you clarify whether the Sherline can be used for pivot polishing and why you use the jewelers lathe for such instead of the Sherline?
    Regards
    Chris
     
  20. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    david just been talking to UK Sherline distributor I mentioned the dial indicator you suggested he wants to clarify what this is used for and is it a plunger or lever type. Can you help further?

    Regards

    Chris
     
  21. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Chris,

    I do worry about some of these sales people sometimes! A dial indicator is a fundamental piece of equipment for many machining jobs, and it's essential if you're setting up work in a 4-jaw independent chuck, because each jaw is separately adjustable so you have to have a way of making sure the work is accurately centred. The dial indicator, regardless of whether it's a lever or plunger type, provides a means of checking whether there's any runout, in other words if the work is centred or is eccentric in the chuck, (it's also used for lots of other things). The indicator is fixed rigidly to a solid base, usually the bed or the cross-slide of the lathe, so that any eccentricity in the work results in movement of the sensing end of it and a reading on the dial.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  22. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Chris to add to Graham's explanation here are a couple of methods I use regularly.

    This dial indicator is always mounted on a QCTP tool holder for quick set up.
    4 jaw dial indicator QCTP holder.jpg

    And here is a lever style indicator used with an adjustable magnetic base.

    centring 2 inch stock for centre.jpg

    The lever style can be useful for reaching into a bore to centre the bore with the axis of the machine. If we take this part out of the lathe for some reason and want to get it back in the 4 jaw and the machined bore centred then I would use the lever style indicator.

    Also note in the picture below there is another indicator in the lower left that is used to bore the hole to an accurate depth by measuring the carriage travel.
    boring major diameter .jpg

    David
     
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  23. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Graham and David, very grateful.
     
  24. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    #74 Jerry Kieffer, Jan 7, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2019
    Chris

    First, I am sure that you will be happy with your purchase.
    Sherline includes probably one of the best instruction guides that I have seen with any piece of equipment. Study it from cover to cover.

    One of the best aspects of Sherline equipment is that every conceivable accessory is readily available. One of the worst aspects of Sherline, is that every conceivable option is available. Thus the the selection process that should cover the big picture of everything you plan to use it for. My following comments will make the assumption right or wrong, that Horological work will be the primary purpose of your purchase.

    This week I will be teaching a special NAWCC Horological lathe course where each student will supply their own Sherline Lathe and specified accessories.

    The course will cover all required Lathe procedures to construct a watch or clock movement from bar stock within Sherlines envelope.

    However, those that bring a 17" bed lathe if they do, will still will be able to complete the course, but will place themselves at a disadvantage for Horological work.
    The long bed lathe comes from the factory with Sherlines larger chucks both spindle and tailstock as well as the 3/8" tool post. The larger chucks and tooling will limit typical horological setups and machining observation close to the chucks, decreasing capabilities and skill development in some cases. The Sherline Lathe is a machine tool lathe designed to do everything that is possible on this size lathe when used as a machine tool Lathe. Part of this capability comes from the use of calibrated leadscrew control of all axis or in plain english, hand wheel settings. In this case, repositioning yourself every time to monitor the carriage hand wheel setting on a long bed will get old very very fast not to mention any operational discomfort from the extended bed. In the many thousands of hours I have spent on small lathes, I have never needed a long bed for Horological work within the machines envelope.

    While I own several indicators and many use/prefer them, I personally tend to favor other methods. However I do use a quality caliper and 1/2" micrometer on a daily basis.


    Per your question while back
    The attached photo shows a common setup for dressing, polishing and or burnishing on the Lathe. The ball bearing guide assures that the tool being used is held parallel to the arbor thus a non tapered pivot. In use, both hands are used, one on the front and one on the back of the tool again assuring maximum control with the ball bearings providing friction free movement and maximum tool feed back.

    Good Luck
    Jerry Kieffer

    fullsizeoutput_343.jpeg
     
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  25. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks for this Jerry its not too late for a change of mind on bed length even though I see the advantages of the longer bed for making tools but the main intended use as you supposed is indeed clock work which therefore lends itself to the shorter bed in terms of accuracy. Also you feel on the short bed model a dial / indicator is not required if I understand you? Are there any special requirements you feel I should ask for with the short bed model/

    kindest regards

    chris
     
  26. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    Chris
    The use of a indicator has nothing to do with the type of machine tool being used but a personal preference method of measuring certain things. A strong case can be made that it is required for some things and should be used by those who feel more comfortable with its results. However in my personal case, I am running out of time since I have worked on projects requiring over 10,000 hours. My best estimate is that I need about 280 years just to complete my current list of projects I would like to complete before they dig the hole.

    To give you an example, the procedures listed by David and Graham are very sound and recommended uses of a indicator. However for myself, I am comfortable comparing runout next to the tip of a lathe tool, requiring only a fraction of the time I no longer have. Sorry about the unclear explanation.

    My suggested starting point for a Sherline Lathe for Horological purposes is as follows.

    *Sherline 4500 lathe plus the "A" package

    * The three piece brazed carbide lathe tool set that will allow you to machine what can be machined. (Then purchase from your regular tool supplier)

    * At least one extra standard double side tool post

    * If you have WW collets, a 8MM collet holder and drawbar.

    * one extra set of steel machinable jaws for the three jaw chuck

    * Rear mounted cut-off parting tool

    * Tailstock drill chuck alignment accessory

    * Steady rest

    From this point, all else will come to light after making chips.

    As a beginner until you are experienced, you should ONLY be using good quality FREE MACHINING METALS including steel from a reputable metal supplier who knows what you are talking about. Show this sentence to them if you need to. This will allow you to quickly develop skill levels and judge what can and should be machine and not machined.

    Jerry Kieffer
     
  27. kinsler33

    kinsler33 Registered User

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    I didn't know that, and thank you. I've contemplated buying a Sherline lathe now and again, and I appreciate the guidance (and especially the list of Sherline stuff you provided in another post herein.)

    As for free-machining steel, you betcha. When I worked for our science museum I scored a great deal of scrap from various exhibits we demolished (and yeah, the museum was incredibly wasteful.) One major find was a large bundle of 1/4" diameter steel rods about 24" in length. They are clearly not made of free-machining steel, however. I went nuts trying to thread them or turn them and I could not figure out what my problem was. (They weld and braze well, and I forged some of them into hinges for other projects, and they bend into splendid hooks, but still.)

    I've also become a fan of carbide bits--the insert kind that Harbor Freight sells (objection noted) and they seem to last forever.

    I should also add that when you're in this sort of semi-business and if you have the extra income to afford something like a Sherline lathe, you probably shouldn't spend great time and energy trying to justify buying it. Read the advice, and then be kind to yourself and buy the thing already: you'll find the uses later on.

    Mark Kinsler
     
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  28. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Mark, useful!
     
  29. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    #79 ChrisCam, Jan 7, 2019
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 8, 2019
    Jerry, you are now my buddy, thank you so much!
     
  30. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Chris,

    Having written about dial indicators, I must admit to using another method if I'm centreing a hole in a part, particularly if I'm boring out a watch plate for a bushing. It's called a wobble stick, (there may well be other names for it elsewhere), and it's very simple and quick.

    DSCF5959.JPG

    If the hole in the plate is centred, (with the tapered end of the rod just riding in it), the other end, (out of the picture and much further away), won't move when the work is rotated. If it isn't centred the outer end of the rod will wobble, and because the rod is balanced on its pivot much closer to the work the movement of the opposite end is magnified. It's clearly only appropriate for applications where there's a hole of some sort for the tip to ride in.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  31. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Graham, an idea worthy of noting for further investigation when time allows, which I promise so to do.

    regards

    Chris
     
  32. MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

    MARK A. BUTTERWORTH Registered User
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    upload_2019-1-8_6-38-36.jpeg upload_2019-1-8_6-34-14.jpeg The difference between the simplicity of the Rollimat and using the lathe for polishing pivots is exactly Why I prefer a machine specifically designed to do this task. In the time it would take me to set up the lathe I can do an entire movement. The Rollimat has a very short learning curve and does the job in seconds or a minute. For me time is money. I love my Sherline, but not for polishing pivots. The Rollimat also is unique in that it is the machine that moves around the pivot. This allows it to polish pivots on crutch arbors, levers, etc. finally, it is the machine that does the job, not me, so there is no learning curve on that as well.
     
  33. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Mark, fully understand the time saved argument so it comes down to that as a pro and the expense of the rollimat which is considerable. Given a certain volume of work probably a good idea.

    Regards

    Chris
     
  34. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    The Rollimat is one trick pony, and a rather expensive one at that. I don't own one but from what I have seen It is no doubt fast, but I'm sure it has its limitations. I would be reluctant to trust a fine hardened French pivot to the jaws of that contraption, but I can (with proper care) polish one in my lathe. Before laying out that kind of money for Rollimat I would like to see physical evidence (electron microscope photos etc) of how the finished pivot surface compares to one finished by burnishing and/or polished in a lathe. Of course the Rollimat cannot replace a pivot and I may be mistaken, but I can't see how it could correct a pivot that is off-center, or one that has be bent etc. If I were concerned about how many clocks I could push out in a week I would probably have one for what it can do, but for now I would not trade my lathe for a Rollimat.

    RC
     
  35. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    Here's a youtube for the Rollimat:



    Wow. That and an Elma bushing machine and you're in business!

    Eric
     
  36. MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

    MARK A. BUTTERWORTH Registered User
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    You are correct it does one thing-burnish pivots. That is the key, it is a machine that does it for you, produces a perfect shoulder, and perfect cylinder pivot in no time. In my case we had and still have a trade shop that does two basic things: polish pivots and install bushings. If folks want machine work then there are machinists for that like Jim Christian and I am happy to refer them. As a trade shop we have to be able to do our job efficiently, in volume, and low cost. Years gone by I did more pivots using a lathe than most folks will ever see, and I would not go back. I agree totally, the Rollimat is not for everyone, but I will still maintain the average person will get far more use out of it than a lathe, although I feel a professional will benefit greatly by owning both.
    As for French pivots, Donnie Sobel at the Clock Shop of Vienna specializes in French clocks, has several Rollimats and has one of them dedicated to the fine hard pivots.
     
  37. Jerry Kieffer

    Jerry Kieffer Registered User
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    Mark
    I have worked with several pivot polishers over the years during demonstrations both privately and at trade shows. While I have never owned one or used one on a regular basis, I have no issue with their use when utilized as designed. However, you must be extremely fast, because the Lathe setup in the photo required installing the pivot support and ball bearing support in the tool post in less than 60 seconds. In addition, holding one end of a tool on a bearing support and the other end on a pivot can hardly be considered a learning curve. For myself personally, clock movements are a small part of what goes on in my shop.

    Again, for myself personally, time is very important, but, money is made based on the quality of my work. With the Lathe support in the tailstock, installed pivots are quickly and easily observed under my loupe for non readily visible issues such as a slightly bent pivot etc. I very seldom work on a movement without finding at least one issue requiring some type of attention . While I have no issue with the quality of finish with pivot polishers in general that I have observed so far, they are not a diagnostic tool. For my personal requirements and standards, the lathe setup serves as a diagnostic tool and pivot conditioning within the same setup. It would remain to be seen if the additional Rollimat procedure would save enough time to justify its use. Pivots from a typical 8 day movement, takes me about 30-45 minutes using the lathe.
    However, utilizing a Milling machine for bushing and verge grinding along with Gage pin reamers to align and fit pivots, saves about 15- 30 minutes while greatly increasing the quality of work over other methods. In my case, I suspect the end result would end up being about the same.

    But who knows, I still may consider a Rollimat one of these days

    Jerry Kieffer
    .
     
  38. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    While one may tire of restoring pivots enough to add a Rollimat to their clock shop, I really can't imagine substituting one for a Lathe. Without either, and given a choice on which one to acquire first, I would recommend a Lathe. I think most members who come to this Forum are trying to learn about clock repair. You'll probably need a Lathe to do much in the way of repairing something beyond routine wear.
     
  39. emhitch

    emhitch Registered User
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    I have a Taig lathe and many accessories for this lathe such as the milling attachment and quick change tool posts from A2Z. I have been very pleased with this system for clock repair and even more so after I converted from the very large and cumbersome AC motor supplied by Taig to a Sherline variable speed DC motor taig lathe back view.jpg taig lathe front view.jpg In addition, I fabricated a variable speed foot pedal allowing me to control the lathe speed (used a 5K wire wound pot as the "control"). The Sherline controller was was modified to allow speed control using either the controller itself or by the foot control. I use the foot control much more often than the Sherline controller. All of that said, I'm pleased with the lathe and the modifications, but before you go through all of this, I would closely evaluate both what you expect to be doing with the lathe (and be honest with yourself because that could save you money in the long run) and examine the Sherline options carefully because I suspect, in the long run, the Sherline may have been a more cost effective system.
     
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  40. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks for this useful information.

    Regards
    Chris
     
  41. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Chris,

    If you look at the BHI website you'll see that they run workshops and training courses at their Upton Hall HQ on a wide variety of subjects, including machine tools.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  42. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Thanks Graham, that could be a real gem, thanks
    chris
     
  43. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Okay, so since we're talking the relative merits of a Lathe vs. a Rollimat when it comes to pivot restoration, where does the Rollimat perform against this scale? Pivot Burnishing - American Watchmakers - Clockmakers Institute

    I can reliably hit "X" on my lathe using my current methods. "W" is an elusive Holy Grail for me. Sometimes I can get very close, but most often I have to settle for X, or "Acceptable".

    Can a Rollimat consistently roll out excellent finishes such as those pictured on AWCI's website? I would love to see some detailed, well lit closeups that demonstrate the before and after capabilities of a $3K pivot polishing machine.
     
  44. MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

    MARK A. BUTTERWORTH Registered User
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    #94 MARK A. BUTTERWORTH, Jan 12, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019
    We just purchased a microscope and maybe provide some decent photos. In the meantime, you might consider starting a thread on the Rollimat and see who contributes information.
    Having said that, it sounds like you have developed a good skill level and results with your lathe practice and are simply trying to kick the level up a notch. You can go from X to W in seconds using our pink finishing disk using your lathe and a dremel or flex shaft tool. There is a YouTube entitled the Butterworth Pivot polishing system. They produce a mirror finish. The disks are dirt cheap.
     
  45. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    I don't know Mark. Dirt is pretty cheap. Even Top Soil! :)
    Thanks for the tip. I am aware of your system. The issue, as I understand it (or perhaps mis-understand it) is that it's difficult to get completely up to the shoulder with your disks. Is that true? I'll check it out.
     
  46. MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

    MARK A. BUTTERWORTH Registered User
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    You are correct. The flexible wheels cannot produce an exact shoulder nor a perfect cylinder. Otherwise they do a remarkable job and will produce a mirror finish in no time. Technically it is also a grinding action rather than a burnishing one.
     
  47. ChrisCam

    ChrisCam Registered User
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    Mark, just out of interest at this point the Rollimat works by either grinding / burnishing thus parts must wear out so who makes the Rollimat and how much are those spares and just as importantly how often do these parts need pelacing.

    Regards

    Chris
     
  48. David S

    David S Registered User
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    There are a couple of issues that I have found using the disks. 1) Sometimes the screw on the end of the mandrel holding the wheel gets too close to an adjacent feature, and 2) The corner rounds off quickly especially on the pink wheels.

    1) I made a very thin "screw head" to hold the wheels see attached pics
    new screw and wrench.jpg difference in clearance.jpg

    To dress the wheels I use a brazed carbide lathe tool that I had lying around. The picture shows the harder wheel being dressed, however the pink wheels need only a very quick touch. I rake the relief angle back to provide a sharper corner to get up to the shoulder of the pivot.
    dressing polishing wheel with brazed carbide.jpg dressing polishing wheels.jpg

    David
     
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  49. MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

    MARK A. BUTTERWORTH Registered User
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    The burnishing wheel is made of carbide. For the average person the wheel will last years before it needs refinishing. We charge $135 here. I don’t know about the UK. Outside of that there isn’t much that can go wrong
     
  50. MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

    MARK A. BUTTERWORTH Registered User
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    The burnishing wheel is made of carbide. For the average person the wheel will last years before it needs refinishing. We charge $135 here. I don’t know about the UK. Outside of that there isn’t much that can go wrong
     

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