Re-bushing Pivot Holes

D

DJDasher

Since becoming interested in old and antique clocks, I have progressed to the point where I can dismantle, clean and reassemble clocks such as Sessions mantle clocks, etc. I have also successfully "drawn" pivot holes using hand tools, KWM cutters and bushings. Basically, I use the methods described by Mr. Daniel Goodman in his publication, "This Old Clock". I feel fairly comfortable rebushing "cheapamericanclocks" as Mr Goodman humurously describes them.

I have recently obtained a clock made by the Smith Patterson Company of Boston Massachusetts. This clock is of better quality than the Sessions type of clock that I am used to working with. This clock has a smaller movement but still operates via a pendulum and enclosed springs. The finish to the movement is better and the pivot holes are smaller and have oil sinks.

Is the procedure for rebushing a finer movement such as the one described above the same as for "cheapamericanclocks"? If so, when preparing the pivot holes to be rebushed, will the presence of the oilsinks in any way cause the reamer to stray from my intended position? Any other information or advice that you may wish to offer will be appreciated.

Thank you...
 
D

DJDasher

Since becoming interested in old and antique clocks, I have progressed to the point where I can dismantle, clean and reassemble clocks such as Sessions mantle clocks, etc. I have also successfully "drawn" pivot holes using hand tools, KWM cutters and bushings. Basically, I use the methods described by Mr. Daniel Goodman in his publication, "This Old Clock". I feel fairly comfortable rebushing "cheapamericanclocks" as Mr Goodman humurously describes them.

I have recently obtained a clock made by the Smith Patterson Company of Boston Massachusetts. This clock is of better quality than the Sessions type of clock that I am used to working with. This clock has a smaller movement but still operates via a pendulum and enclosed springs. The finish to the movement is better and the pivot holes are smaller and have oil sinks.

Is the procedure for rebushing a finer movement such as the one described above the same as for "cheapamericanclocks"? If so, when preparing the pivot holes to be rebushed, will the presence of the oilsinks in any way cause the reamer to stray from my intended position? Any other information or advice that you may wish to offer will be appreciated.

Thank you...
 

Bob Reichel

NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Member
Feb 13, 2001
976
4
16
Phil's mention of plugging a hole, bring to mind the use of a "Preacher". It is a three legged device that 'reads' the original hole and applys two pin pricks to an area near the hole. This allows use of these two pin pricks to be used to mark the new center of the plugged hole. I made mine from three pieces of sharpened drill rod held together with a small triangle of steel.

Bob Reichel
 

Carroll Hardin

Registered User
Jul 24, 2001
314
1
0
Bob,

I would be very interested in learning about your "preacher" used in relocating pivot holes and how it is made.
Thanks in advance,

Carroll Hardin
 

Carroll Hardin

Registered User
Jul 24, 2001
314
1
0
Phil.

Thanks so much for the drawing of the PREACHER.
Is this intended to be a temporary substitute for the depthing tool?

Carroll Hardin
 

Forum statistics

Threads
174,393
Messages
1,523,855
Members
52,192
Latest member
danarog
Encyclopedia Pages
1,063
Total wiki contributions
2,971
Last page
Hard Life for Wristwatches by Roy Gardner