Rare GE clock?

agaric1

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So I finally managed to get this clock after being stood up on my first scheduled meetup. It seems especially heavy and got the right motor and stuff. I really like it myself but I got to get it working (probably not a big problem). I was just wondering if anyone had any educated guesses for the value? Thanks S6302255.JPG
 
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demoman3955

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my thoughts are the same as i posted on your last post about it, but no way to know a value unless you can find comparables.
 

new2clocks

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I was just wondering if anyone had any educated guesses for the value?
The best educated guess is probably what you paid for it.

You also ask if the clock is rare. (This was asked on another thread.) Rarity is irrelevant if there is no demand for the object. As you were able to purchase the clock on Facebook, I doubt the demand for the clock is high.

Regards.
 

Betzel

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Well, value to all collectors is not always related to market value, but it depends on your perspective. I've collected several worthless clocks that I absolutely love, as have many of us (I suspect)? So, it is what it is. Press on.

In my view, having clocks as original as possible is one of the most important things, and it's now becoming more important to me than function, or maybe I've become more eclectic by participating in this forum. You may be tempted to replace things that are not working inside (motor, etc.) but to me they are an essential part of the history and charm. If you like it and have a place for it, why not keep it all intact and original until you develop the skills to repair and save those original components?
 
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leeinv66

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An advertising wall clock will always (well, mostly always) be more sort after than the same clock with a plan label. I would think that is pretty much a given in clock collecting. At least that has been my experience. I don't think picking it up through Facebook effects its desirability one way or the other. I'd expect to pay around $100us for a good condition plan label GE clock like this, so I could see this one doing half that again. Industrial style electric wall clocks are fairly collectable these days.
 
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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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For those curious, here is a link to the earlier posting:

Is this GE wall clock rare/valuable? | NAWCC Forums

Would make sense for one of the moderators to combine the 2 threads as both are not necessary.

For the OP's reference, there is in fact a thread devoted to advertising clocks in the General Clock Discussion forum which includes a variety of electrics as well and would probably attract those interested in and more knowledgeable about a clock such as this. Here's a link to that thread:

Share your advertising clocks. | NAWCC Forums

Some most wonderful clocks to see there, both electric and mechanical. Check it out!

Also see Bruner's book "Advertising Clocks: America's Timeless Heritage". Have to also recommend Maltz, "Baird Advertising Clocks".

I see nothing that makes me question the authenticity of the clock. Frankly, I believe that if someone was going to "fake" the advertising on the dial, they would probably have chosen something a bit more desirable then for servicing toasters? I actually like it. Very 1940's or '50's? Probably hung in an appliance store or the appliance department of a department store.

I suspect that the dial probably had a glass over it, now missing?

If not currently running, it in fact may NOT be easy to get running. The electric motors, IMCO, are not nearly as easy to service as a mechanical one. The coils go bad, they burn out, etc. By the way , make sure the cord and plug are in good shape before plugging it in. The electrical cords of that vintage just crumble. I would suspect someone on the Electric Clocks forum might be able to provide guidance with regards to servicing.

You asked about value. As a general statement, advertising antiques and collectibles are white hot! There seems to be a strong demand for many trade signs and advertising of all sorts including clocks and that includes electrics. Condition, eye appeal and subject matter seem to effect value most. Also, electric clocks with back lit dials and especially those with neon are what people generally want. They want them to run. Regarding yours. Well, it's nice. Can't give you a $ amount, though I'm not sure yours is exactly a barn burner. But who knows. I just followed on line a 2 day Midwestern auction with much advertising. I was flabbergasted by the prices, including what people paid for some items that were repainted or restored. All I came away with was I think a wonderful salesman's sample toilet for a well known American plumbing fixtures company, probably the '20's or '30's. Not my first one. Okay, I'm weird.

Check out an auction site like live auctioneers. See if something similar sold?

If you liked it, that's what counts.

RM
 
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agaric1

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Thanks for the replies. Some were more helpful than others. And finding on facebook does not really matter. I mean you can find great items at goodwill if you just keep going back there, right? The clock is complete and feels "heavy" which is good? The glass is there, cord looks fine, but it does not run. It has the Telechron motor, which I am familiar with. I think I can repair and keep it all original but if the rotor has to be replaced, were they not designed to be easily replaced? I was just curious about a price. I would probably never sell it. The clock would probably not go for a price that would be worth it to me. Now if someone came along that worked for GE most his life, or worked in a service center, and absolutely loved looking at this clock, maybe I would sell to him. But probably not otherwise.
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Thanks for the replies. Some were more helpful than others. And finding on facebook does not really matter. I mean you can find great items at goodwill if you just keep going back there, right? The clock is complete and feels "heavy" which is good? The glass is there, cord looks fine, but it does not run. It has the Telechron motor, which I am familiar with. I think I can repair and keep it all original but if the rotor has to be replaced, were they not designed to be easily replaced? I was just curious about a price. I would probably never sell it. The clock would probably not go for a price that would be worth it to me. Now if someone came along that worked for GE most his life, or worked in a service center, and absolutely loved looking at this clock, maybe I would sell to him. But probably not otherwise.
Yes, goodies do appear @ Goodwill. I just read a story about an ancient Roman marble bust which turned up for a few $$! Unfortunately, the lucky owner couldn't keep it. Turns out it had been looted from a German museum during the American occupation after WW II. I guess some GI was souvenir hunting. Sure beats sending home a cuckoo clock.

Actually, Goodwill, The Salvation Army, etc. have actually hired folks to screen donations so such valuable things don't get sold for a few $$. There's another instance I vaguely recall (and may not have right). Printed versions of the Declaration of Independence were distributed so that it could be read to the population of the new US. No internet, radio or TV. These printed versions are now extremely rare and valuable. One turned up folded in back of a cheap print in a frame or something like that.

The beauty of most spring and weight driven brass American movements are that they are relatively easy to service. Basic movements. There are exceptions which has lead to some really screwed up repairs and even having them replaced.

I'm not so sure about electrics like Telechrons. I believe they were actually meant to be replaced when they croaked. Easiest solution.

You even see that today with many modern German mechanical movements. Doesn't pay to fix them. Order a replacement.

Someone in the electric horology forum probably has experience addressing any of the challenges involved in servicing these motors. Don't take my word for it.

I like the "Mid-century Modern" decoration of your dial. And like I said, advertising is very hot right now.

For "comps", check out some of the on-line auction platforms.

RM
 

agaric1

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Interesting that you see the mechanical stuff as easier to repair. Quite honestly, I see them and they look very complicated compared to the electrical ones. With telechron, I think you were supposed to mostly change out the rotor then you were good. Now rotors are expensive and not readily available. Fixing rotors is a skill in itself. I was told that the coils RARELY went bad. My first clock repair was the one in my avatar. I worked on the rotor but no luck. I suspected the coil but I was told they were "bulletproof" as one person put it. But guess what? I was right. My first repair was a rare type I guess. My next project, besides the one in this post, is a sessions. Also, with electric types, you have the electricity to worry about also. I would love to be able to repair the mechanical clocks but they just look more difficult to me. Guess it's just a matter of experience or something?
 

Jim Andrews

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Some of these early electric clocks were not self-starting. Check on the movement and see if there's any sort of tab or button that you can press. Sometimes they are well hidden. Best of luck.
 

Betzel

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If you find a tab or button to start this thing, please share a photo! Like crank starting an old car?

Strange as it may seem, it doesn't matter (to me) how a clock tries to regulate time, mechanically, electrically, atmospherically or chemically, etc. as time is independent of how we might try to measure it. It just does not care about us; not at all. All in good time. What does matter is how it makes us smile. I think we're all kind of goofy like this, regardless of our strong opinions. We're all still right here at the end of the day. Some have a higher market value, sure, but this is a passion. Sand running through glass is as cool to me as cesium decaying, a weight dropping or a spring unwinding. Not a problem...

I've turned down a few commutators (sometimes with my wife's foam boards) and hand dimensioned new carbon brushes to make old things work, so I hope you can bush the motor bearings (if needed) and your coils are not shorted, so it can do what it did, like it did in it's day. Absolute psychos even rewind armature coils that have shorted and solder them back onto the commutators. Why not? Castles made of sand fall to the sea, eventually, but they are beautiful while standing. I suspect a few "precious" museum pieces do not always get wound for the common man who may not care. Save the run for those who appreciate watching steam locomotives puff?

Repair and restoration for anything ancient and honorable is pretty much the same if you want to preserve what once was as much as possible. All the best with any sympathetic restoration required. Sounds like you will enjoy doing it!
 

demoman3955

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Interesting that you see the mechanical stuff as easier to repair. Quite honestly, I see them and they look very complicated compared to the electrical ones. With telechron, I think you were supposed to mostly change out the rotor then you were good. Now rotors are expensive and not readily available. Fixing rotors is a skill in itself. I was told that the coils RARELY went bad. My first clock repair was the one in my avatar. I worked on the rotor but no luck. I suspected the coil but I was told they were "bulletproof" as one person put it. But guess what? I was right. My first repair was a rare type I guess. My next project, besides the one in this post, is a sessions. Also, with electric types, you have the electricity to worry about also. I would love to be able to repair the mechanical clocks but they just look more difficult to me. Guess it's just a matter of experience or something?
The first electric clock i worked on wouldnt run at all. I pulled the rotor out, and cleaned it with fine steel wool where it goes into the coil. Then i noticed the coil was really black where the rotor slides into it, so i cleaned it up the same way, anywhere it would contact the rotor, put it all back together and its been running for a few months now
 
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