Questions

Joshua2

Registered User
Feb 6, 2014
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I have just recently gained interest in wrist and pocket watches. I have decided to purchase the basic tools so I can start trying to disassemble and assemble movements. I want to also start with basic cleanings,no ultra sonic just store bought cleaner. I guess my question is when I start taking apart the basic movement parts my jewels will be connected to these, will I be rinsing the movement parts with the jewels on them I can't imagine taking jewels out this early in the learning process. If I do clean the movement part with the jewels on them then what is a safe product to use and what is the max time to let them soak I don't want to loosen the shellac that holds the jewels. And what parts should i never put in cleaner.
 

doug sinclair

Registered User
Aug 27, 2000
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Welcome,

Rather than us trying to teach you watch repair "by correspondence" via this MB, and being given many varied opinions (some right, some....well!), I think you need to pick up books. For example, Henry Fried's Watch Repairer's Manual, or the Joseph Bulova School of Watchmaking Instruction Manual, or the books by DeCarle. That way, you will have an easy reference by your side, and consistency in instruction. You clearly require a basic understanding of watch construction. As to "store bought cleaners", I know of no such thing applicable to cleaning watches. Don't expect your first few attempts to be successful, so start on Junkers, just to get the feel.
 

Smudgy

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May 20, 2003
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Doug has provided good feedback, but I just thought I would say that if a jewel is shellacked in place you don't want to remove it from the part you are cleaning. As far as the other jewels go, they can be left in place except for the cap jewels that should be removed (put the hole jewels and screws back in place during the cleaning in order to reduce the likelihood of mixing or losing them). Along with the books listed by Doug above the Chicago Watchmakers Course is often posted for download somewhere on the net (I'm not sure of the current status of where it may be available). Joining the NAWCC gives access to the extensive NAWCC library, along with local chapter members and events (if available).

There are cleaners available for watch cleaning at the material houses. Check the Parts Sources thread at the top of the Watch Repair board.
 

Firegriff

Registered User
Feb 22, 2013
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I have just recently gained interest in wrist and pocket watches. I have decided to purchase the basic tools so I can start trying to disassemble and assemble movements. I want to also start with basic cleanings,no ultra sonic just store bought cleaner. I guess my question is when I start taking apart the basic movement parts my jewels will be connected to these, will I be rinsing the movement parts with the jewels on them I can't imagine taking jewels out this early in the learning process. If I do clean the movement part with the jewels on them then what is a safe product to use and what is the max time to let them soak I don't want to loosen the shellac that holds the jewels. And what parts should i never put in cleaner.
There are also DVD lessons that you can order, I like the ones by Tick Tock productions I have the watch maintenance series and the lathe series it helps to visualize what you read in the books.
 

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