Questions about Howard No. 2 installation

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by Jeremy Woodoff, Nov 1, 2016.

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  1. Jeremy Woodoff

    Jeremy Woodoff Registered User
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    Jun 30, 2002
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    Here are pictures of a Howard No. 2 time-only, manual-wind movement that is unused. Though it is still in its original location, its function has been replaced with an electric movement, seen affixed to the top of the mechanical movement. Those responsible for the clock are not interested in restoring it and maintaining it in place as a functional clock, and the opportunity has arisen to relocate the old movement to a public area of another building (a library), restore it, and have it operating with a dial to serve a useful purpose. Though I am not happy about moving the mechanism from its original location, I feel it is probably for the best in this case. I have some questions about the set up of the clock in order to design a proper enclosure and support for the weight in a public area.

    You can see the historic set up, with two direction-changing pulleys attached to the ceiling and a compound pulley above the weight. Is there a reason for the two-pulley set up, rather than having a single pulley at the ceiling? The set up allowed the weight to drop about 5 1/2 feet (the floor to ceiling height is 9 feet 6 inches, but the three pulleys (single plus compound) take up about 2 1/2 feet and the weight itself 1 1/2 feet). Without doing calculations on the movement, would anyone know if this amount of drop allows for a 7-day run time? Remember, there is a compound pulley, so the effective weight drop is 10 feet, if it were not compounded. Also, with the set up pictured, does each pulley attachment at the ceiling have to support only half the total weight? It is unknown whether we can support the weight from the ceiling in the new location or, more likely, will build a stand to support the weight at the correct height. I have been looking at designs for stands/enclosures of publicly-displayed tower clock movements (at the NAWCC Museum and what I can find on-line), but any suggestions would be appreciated. There will probably have to be an acrylic case around the movement to protect both the clock from the public and the public from the clock, and perhaps a separate shaft for the weight.--Jeremy

    . IMG_7840.JPG IMG_7847.JPG IMG_7838.JPG IMG_7849.JPG
     
  2. gvasale

    gvasale Registered User
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    work in a machine shop, not as a machinist
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    You're lucky as much of the mechanism is still there. I've seen a couple of setups where the gears have been removed except for the transmission which is used only to operate the four dials.
     
  3. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

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    #3 doug sinclair, Nov 2, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2016
    The Seattle Washington chapter of NAWCC did a project just like the one you are undertaking. The clock is located in the ferry terminal at Colman Dock in Seattle. I have pictures of it, somewhere. I'll see if I can round them up and post them.

    Update: A bit of browsing on the internet revealed a site that shows numerous pictures of the Colman Dock Ferry Terminal in Seattle. Some archival pictures, and (while I didn't peruse the text), it may detail how the original ferry terminal tower (and tower clock) ended up submerged in Seattle Harbor! You'll have to scroll down to the picture which shows the restored and re-located tower clock as it is today. Hope this is some help.

    http://www.historylink.org/File/7559
     
  4. Jeremy Woodoff

    Jeremy Woodoff Registered User
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    Thank you, Doug. This same clock seems to be pictured in two locations--one inside the ferry terminal and one outside. The housing for it is very similar but not identical in both locations. It must have been restored and located in one place and then moved to the other, though none of the sites with pictures explains this. The clock we would be restoring originally had one dial only, and the linkage is still present. The Coleman Dock clock is raised up and seems to have the weight drop beneath the movement; there must be an autowind, though I don't see it. We'd want to keep ours manually-wound, so the weight will need a considerable drop. Anyway, the Coleman clock picture is a good one to add to my collection as we start to figure out what this should look like. Thanks.
     
  5. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

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    The Colman Dock tower clock was originally set up within the ferry terminal. That's where it was when I last saw it. It would seem as though it is now outside. It was manually wound for a number of years, but was converted to electric wind. FWIW.
     
  6. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

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    There is a photo of an installation much like the one I think you have in mind, in the current issue of the NAWCC Bulletin. This project can be found in the article on the 2016 crafts completion. As an NAWCC member, you have access to that issue either on line, or in a hard copy.
     

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