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Question on early Long Case Clocks

wspohn

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I was curious about the production trend for month going clocks and whether they became more or less common between the late 17th C. and mid 18th C. It seemed to me that they may have been more common early on and perhaps tapered off later?

My other question is a stylistic one - when did the 'porthole' sight window for the pendulum bob fall out of fashion? Again, it seems to be a feature of earlier clocks that fell out of use/fashion later on
 

Mike Phelan

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My other question is a stylistic one - when did the 'porthole' sight window for the pendulum bob fall out of fashion? Again, it seems to be a feature of earlier clocks that fell out of use/fashion later on
You're right, John. They disappeared in the early 1700's and AFAIK were never a feature in thirty-hour clocks.
 

zedric

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They did persist a bit later in country areas
 

jmclaugh

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Afaik month going longcase clocks were never common and cases with a lenticle in the door are found into the early 1700s to around 1725 by which time they were regarded as old fashioned.
 

PatH

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I was curious about the production trend for month going clocks and whether they became more or less common between the late 17th C. and mid 18th C. It seemed to me that they may have been more common early on and perhaps tapered off later?
I hope this doesn't derail, your original questions......I've seen month-going wall clocks, primarily regulators, but don't recall seeing a Long Case month-going. Were they from the same era? Thanks.
 

wspohn

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I have seen several month going wall or table clocks but many have been Regency or early Victorian. I expect that someone will pop up to give a more authoritative answer. They would need longer and stronger springs than a regular clock.

It is my understanding that there were long case clocks with movements that would run for 3, 6 or even 12 months between winding. The weights would have been commensurately heavier than an 8 day or month running clock, which are in turn considerably heavier than an 8 day clock. I have a month running clock that came to me without weights and those on the board were kind enough to give me guidelines from which I could work out how much weight to use.

Longest running clock I have will go for many years without winding - but it is a 'cheater' - a JLC Atmos clock that runs off changes in barometric pressure.
 

Jevan

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Towards the end of 1658 an advert for Ahasuerus Fromanteel clocks appeared in the Mercurius Politicus and the Commonwealth Mercury.

Very roughly it said… there is lately a way found for making Clocks that go exactly and keep better time than any now made and may be made to go a week, or a month, or a year, with one winding up, as well as those that are wound up every day. Very good for all House Clocks that go either with springs or weights.

Regardless of whether or not any longer duration clocks were made by Fromanteel it seems apparent the technology existed from the very beginning of the age of the English domestic clock… which I consider is when the pendulum was introduced to clockwork.

Perhaps interesting but probably not representative the Tompion workshop between around 1675-1750 (Tompion/Banger/Graham) is known to have produced around 360 longcases although the figure may be much higher, of these 360 clocks about 140 were month and less than 10 were year clocks.
Assuming there was a clock for every number in the Tompion numbering system there are still approaching 300 Tompion clocks that it is not generally known if they were spring or weight clocks.
 
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