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Question about Schatz 'ELEXACTA' swing clock

Regalansonia

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May 11, 2004
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I have a Schatz 'Elexacta' wall swing clock in for repair. In the past, it has worked properly, with a wide arc swing, and kept time. When the owner replaced the battery (D size), it quit. After some trial and error, it was found that when the clock was made, probably in the late '60's, the D size batteries were lighter in weight. Finally finding a light weight cheap battery, the clock once again functioned as intended. Now, even with a new light weight battery, it has a very narrow arc swing, resulting in the clock gaining a lot of time in 12 hours, so much so, that any attempt to regulate it is futile. I have tried to use a AA battery that is much lighter in weight to no avail. I also checked the two 'cups' that the clock rocks back and forth in and found them to be in alignment and clean, as are the points on the clock itself that fit into those cups. So, if anyone has had the distinct pleasure to have worked on one of these, and succeeded, please let me know what you did. The movement is clean, and has sufficient oil where needed, and the contact on the lever to wind the spring is clean and bright. What do I do now, except return the clock and tell the owner it is correct twice a day as it hangs inoperative on the wall? The movement is marked 'EL67'. Thanks to any and all who can help here.

Al Stevenson.
 

eskmill

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Al. A more "exact" discription of your customer's Elexacta clock would help. The model name "Elexacta" was used on many Schatz battery clocks, all different in principle, form and details.

I have to guess that your example is one of the compound pendulum Elexacta varities. Some with a "klapmagnet" movement and some with a transistor switched electro-magnetic actuated minor pendulum.

As you explained, the mass of the dry cell is critical to the operation......alkaline steel jacketed cells are not only too heavy in the "D" size but substitutes in smaller less heavy sizes, the steel jacket interferes with the magnetic circuit in the models using the transistor switched electromagnetic minor pendulum.

I have no knowledge of the model number on the movements. A photo of the movement will eliminate guessing.

Additionally, the minor pendulum on the "Queen Anne" models is often lost. Any replacement is critical to the operation.

Photos please.
 

dAz57

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Dec 7, 2011
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with the cups and pivot pins of the suspension, check the pivot points, these are a ball bearing same as used in ball point pens, make sure the ball is round and smooth, sometimes these can fall out, next check the cup jewels, for this take a sharp pin or needle and run the point around in the cup, it should feel smooth, if the jewels are at all notchy then they are probably chipped and will need replacement.

the cups came in two versions, one with a set screw behind the jewel that could be unscrewed and the jewel swapped out for a new one, and the later versions the jewel was a press fit and the whole cup had to be replaced.
 

doug sinclair

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As I recall with these, there is an "onion" shaped appendage at the bottom of the "stem" of these clocks which is the device used for regulating the clock. Much in the same manner as you would move the pendulum up or down to regulate a more conventional pendulum clock. In effect, these clocks have two pendulums. The one behind the movement which opeartes the escapement, and the bottom one for regulating. Had this occurred to you?
 

dAz57

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the difference in weight of a carbon battery compared to an alkaline could be compensated by the beat or balance adjuster at the top of the dial pan above the movement, two sizes of weights (looked like a large flat knurled knob) that could be swapped out depending on which battery was used
 

Regalansonia

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I tried to post a couple of pics, but my 'puter just decided to squat and do nothing. So, in that absence, Ill try to answer the several questions that were posted in reply to my initial query. This movement appears to be the "klapmagnet" type, with secondary small pendulum that is attached to the back of the movement in the same manner as the pendulum leader on a cuckoo clock, and moves in opposite direction to the longer pendulum that extends downward from the clock itself, that also has a regulator at the bottom in the shape of a 'pear'. This small pendulum has a slot in it that engages the verge crutch leader, much like a regular German clock set-up. There is also a device behind the movement and clock case that has notches and moves from left to right so that the movement can be put in beat. Tried that, to no avail. Several years ago lightweight batteries were available and worked fine in this clock, but I have no idea if one can find them anymore. Sorry that I cant post the pics, and thanks to all that replied. Al
 

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shutterbug

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One of your pic's is there. The others may be too big. Try reducing their size and try again.
 

dAz57

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these clocks were made before alkaline batteries were available, I haven't used any for a long time but you still buy cheap carbon batteries which are lighter than the alkalines, don't advise using them but, the shelf life is short and they can leak long before the clock will stop, by then the damage is done.

the beat adjuster knob at the top was available in two sizes or thickness, the thicker one for the lighter battery, and a thinner one for alkalines.

so either get someone to make a new thinner knob, or get a stack of washers more or less the same diameter as the knob with a small hole sized to the thread of the beat adjuster, and hold them on place with a nut or wingnut, it will be a metric thread, that way you can add or remove the washers to suit.

back to your lack of swing, the main problem with these Queen Anne clocks is the pivots and jewel cups, the pivots have a ball bearing end like a ball point pen, so it has to be smooth and round, not flattened.

chipped jewels is the other, you need to check the jewels with a needle, run the tip around in the cup, it should feel smooth, if it feels rough at all then the jewel has to be replaced,

clean the jewels with a cotton bud/q-tip dipped in lighter fluid, put a drop of light oil in each cup, no need to fill the cup with oil here.
 

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