Question about pendulum driven crosscut sawyers animation.

Willie X

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I have been working on this 1975 Schmeckenbecher (?). Everything is working now but I suspect a problem with the arm pivot. It seems as though the steel arm driving wire would be loose inside the little brass tube, that goes through the figures body, to cut friction.

On this one it looks like the wire has been made fast inside the brass tube and the whole tube rotates back and forth. The inside arm is just hanging loose on the tube and the tube is attached to the driven sawyer's outside arm as you would expect.

There is no damage or any evidence of a previous repair.

Hopefully someone has something similar ...

Thanks in advance, Willie X

IMG_20210728_160418.jpg IMG_20210728_160609.jpg
 
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JimmyOz

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Looking at the 2nd photo it looks like it is meant to be that way. It could be that they had issues with just making the wire go through the body on its own and the problems with rusting and the thinness of the wire made it like a saw and cut into the wood, therefore they sleeved it in brass?
 

ChimeTime

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Hope I understand your question correctly.

I think that the steel rod is supposed to be semi-fixed inside the brass tube. Any force applied on the end of the bent-over steel rod Left or Right then sets the sawman's arm in motion. The bent-over steel rod forms a lever. The length of the steel lever is used as a "force multiplier" to overcome the drag of the sawman's arm and saw movement (which obviously doesn't rotate on precision arbors). So if the lower end of the steel lever is moved back and forth 10°, then the sawman's arm (which is shorter) also moves 10°, but with a greater force. That way the arm can be actuated with very little energy removed from the pendulum.

So you want to leave the steel rod alone, except to adjust the action of the arm to be mid-stroke when the pendulum is at rest. You would also want to lubricate the brass tube where it rides inside the sawman's body.

Hope this helps.
 

Willie X

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I know how it works. I just thought someone would actually have one and could see if the brass tube is supposed to be fixed in the figure and used as the bearing for the steel wire, or not?

This is an odd cuckoo The bellows are much longer and narrower than usual. The bird is actuated by a long curved wire that rubs against the left bellow top. The small roof mounted MB plays the same tune 4 times in a row, really fast. Whew!

Willie X
 

shutterbug

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I don't have one, but I'd think the whole rod would turn. What does the wire attach to on the movement? The only way I can make it work in my mind with a stationary rod would be if the wire attached to his hand some way. Unless, of course, the saw and arm work independently. Newer ones have the saw in his hand. Yours looks like the saw is lower.
The wire is the mystery :)
 
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ChimeTime

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I know how it works. I just thought someone ...could see if the brass tube is supposed to be fixed in the figure and used as the bearing for the steel wire, or not?
Ah, my misunderstanding.

Can you pull the arm away from the woodman's body just enough to slip a 0.002" feeler gauge between the body and the arm ? Depending upon what the feeler comes to rest on might possibly give you an indication of whether the tube continues into the left arm.

From the photo of the woodman's left bicep, it certainly looks like the outside arm is mounted on the steel rod.
 
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Willie X

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The brass tube goes through the loose right arm, through the figure and is attached to the left arm. Willie X
 

shutterbug

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Oh. That makes sense now. I was envisioning the right arm moving. I see now that it's the left one. But I still think the tube has to be moving, and am still not sure where that wire comes into the puzzle. It looks like there's a part broken off from the tube that used to interact with the verge somehow. Probably a vertical wire on the verge rocked between a fork which in turn moved the arm.
 

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