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Quartz clock circuit board.

Fenner

Registered User
Sep 25, 2012
442
5
18
Barnoldswick.Lancs
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Does anybody out there have any knowledge of who supplies parts for the electronic circuit board that goes into a movement. I know that you can buy the whole clock movement for next to nothing but I like tinkering and wondered if I can buy the parts which consist of only the coil,quartz crystal and the printed circuit board. I have recently had a Kienzle movement to replace and don't like throwing anything away and would like to attempt the repair It is not the coil as I have done an continuity test which to my mind it is the quartz crystal which I think is in a metal case and put a current through it doesn't activate my crystal test meter Somebody has to build these so there must be a supplier somewhere. just interested. fenner
 

R. Croswell

Registered User
Apr 4, 2006
10,826
1,049
113
Trappe, Md.
www.greenfieldclockshop.com
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Does anybody out there have any knowledge of who supplies parts for the electronic circuit board that goes into a movement. I know that you can buy the whole clock movement for next to nothing but I like tinkering and wondered if I can buy the parts which consist of only the coil,quartz crystal and the printed circuit board. I have recently had a Kienzle movement to replace and don't like throwing anything away and would like to attempt the repair It is not the coil as I have done an continuity test which to my mind it is the quartz crystal which I think is in a metal case and put a current through it doesn't activate my crystal test meter Somebody has to build these so there must be a supplier somewhere. just interested. fenner
As strange as it may sound your best source of parts may be to buy a new movement "for next to nothing", or find a good used movement, and remove the parts you need.

RC
 

dAz57

Registered User
Dec 7, 2011
2,018
30
48
sydney Australia
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Yeah second that, first gen quartz components were individual parts mounted on the circuit board, the clock chip was a 6 leg ic generally with trimmers and caps, now everything is mounted directly on the circuit board and covered in black epoxy, non serviceable parts.

Either use a retired movement where the battery has not leaked and the fault is mechanical or just buy a new movement and gut the circuit from that.

If the clock has a movement custom made for it like a tide, world time and you cannot buy a replacement, if the coil is still good, then it's a simple matter of giving the clock a service then replace and wire in a new circuit, you cannot fix the old circuit becuase there is nothing to fix.

If on the other hand you want to repair a easily replaced common movement, then it's simply not worth the effort, they fail from battery leakage, mechanically where the oil gums up and if the clock has been in service for a long time they actually do wear out, plastic gets brittle etc.

Sure pull them apart, learn how they work.
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
74
0
Calif. USA
Many clocks have the bare IC mounted directly on the
PC board and glob of epoxy over the top.
I don't think there is a supply place that you can
get anything other than the crystal for much cheaper
than you can get a hole movement, in singles.
Places like Anchor Electronics sell the crystal but often
the IC has fuses that are set to tune the crystal.
Mixing crystals may not give the accuracy expected
from a quartz clock.
You could buy the IC but you'd be expected to buy 10,000
of them. You could then configure something to calibrate
them to match the crystal.
I've seen others cut the active parts of the circuit and
buddy it over the old circuit. One would cut traces and
solder wires across. I think this is the easiest option.
Tinker Dwight
 

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