PROBLEMS WITH AUTO BEAT SETTING

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by John P, Oct 8, 2018.

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  1. John P

    John P Registered User
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    Sep 17, 2010
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    I am working on a Emperor grandfather clock with a JAUCH movement which is junk. I have installed a new
    451-050H Hermle movement.
    The issue is this, once I have the clock in beat, put the back panel on with its 10 screws, then push the clock up into the corner where she wants it, its no longer in beat.
    These clocks don't have removable hoods or side panels, adjustable leaders, that allows one reach in and set the beat so we have to rely on the auto beat setting mechanism to put them in beat. HA .
    I have found that the pendulum is too light to move the verge into correct beat and the waist of the clock too narrow for a wide swing. I have tried adding weight to the pendulum bob but that didn't help.
    I have spoken to Mark Butterworth and he thinks the springs are set too heavy on the verge.
    I would like some advice on how to get these darn things to work right. If you have run into this problem,
    and came up with a fix, please chime in and help me figure out what we can do about this.

    thanks ahead
    johnp
     
  2. wow

    wow Registered User
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    If it is auto-beat, the clutch should slip easily. You should be able to hold the pendulum rod near the bob with one hand and with slight pressure on the upper part of the rod, make the clutch slip right or left with the other hand. Try both directions until you get it right.
     
  3. MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

    MARK A. BUTTERWORTH Registered User
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    Several options
    Set the beat manually once the clock is in place.
    Replace the suspension spring with a much lighter one.
    Ighten the spring you have by filing away about 50% of the leaf.
    Replace the verge with a manual beat set one.
     
  4. James Foster

    James Foster Registered User
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    #4 James Foster, Oct 8, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
    John

    A suggestion from Hermle in Virginia with which I have had limited success, use a shorter heavy pendulum to set the beat that allows you to exaggerate the swing. I believe the actual suggestion was to use a crescent wrench or anything. Then change to the correct pendulum.

    Jim
     
  5. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

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    I would suggest the first thing to do is check that the clock is level in its corner location and if not, shim it so that it is level when in place and see if it is in beat. If not, then pull the clock from the corner, level it and set the beat, restrain the pendulum and return the clock to the corner, make sure it is still level and see how it runs. If it is in beat when level in one place it should also be in beat when level at another place.

    RC
     
  6. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    John,

    You will forever have problems unless you exchange the movement for a 'deadbeat' one. If that isn't possible, you can exchange/replace the escapewheel and crutch assembly. This will convert your 'autobeat' to a 'deadbeat' and all will be well again.

    The newer Hermle autobeat clutches take about 45 grams of side pressure to move the clutch.

    Mark gave a recommended case width about a year or so back. I think it was the pendulum diameter + 7 inches. So another option would be to exchange your pendulum to a smaller diameter and heavier. The pendulum weight is important but I have never seen any figures published on that adpect ... You have to have the necessary case width and pendulum weight for an auto-beat to work propetly.

    This brings us back to my first sentence.

    Good luck, Willie X
     
  7. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    I just reach up into the case, following the pendulum until I can feel the crutch. It can then be moved a bit to set the beat. Alternately, you can move the top of the pendulum. The latter makes small adjustments harder though.
     
  8. John P

    John P Registered User
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    I have been working with pinching up the pendulum hanger and removing as much slop as possible, adding some more lead to the bob. Seems to work much better but there is a limit because you will not be able to remove/install the pendulum.
    I think this will work now. I have the timetrax on it now and its close enough to run fine. I am installing levers to the bottom of the case and will be able to fine tune it then.

    thanks
    johnp
     
  9. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    #9 Willie X, Oct 9, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2018
    The beat doesn't have to be exact. Anything below 50 or 60 on a Timetrax is fine. That's another bad thing about an autobeat clock. The 'auto' feature never gives you a good beat, just close enough. However, a good beat can be achieved manually, as Bugs just described, but you will have to redo it ocasionally. Winding the clock, setting the hands, letting the clock run down, and of course bumping the pendulum, can knock it out of beat. That's why I said what I said in my first post.

    Making the pendulum 'fast' to the leader is not a good idea and re-adjusting the position of the case should not be necessary.

    Willie X
     
  10. MARK A. BUTTERWORTH

    MARK A. BUTTERWORTH Registered User
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    This unit is available in the manual beat set version. If you purchase the conversion kit for the Jauch movement, the manual beat set is included in that.
     
  11. John P

    John P Registered User
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    #11 John P, Oct 10, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018
    Auto beat setting is working fine. I can knock it out of beat, swing pendulum all the way till it hits wood and release and when it settles down , its pretty darn close to being perfect.
    Not sure exactly what made it start working right, just kept fiddling with it until it gave up but a couple of things for sure made a difference. Getting as much rocking motion out of the pendulum hanger as possible and adding weight to the bob.
    (I used those flat, sticky lead weights they put on mag wheels, trimmed down and inserted into the bob)
    I suppose it could have just broke in from all the fiddling around with it but it works good now so I can move on to the other clock issues in the shop.

    thanks for the help





    thanks for the tips
    johnp
     

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