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problem with urgos movement

hdmac

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Aug 6, 2011
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Have an 03015 movement and the minute hand binds up at the 3 numeral and stops the clock. Manually moving the hand past the "rough" spot (just past the 6 numeral) frees it up and it will run fine for another 45 minutes until it gets to the 3 again. Oiling has not helped. Is this a wear problem? Is it worth trying to fix? Appreciate any info.
 

harold bain

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Hi, hdmac, welcome to the message board. It's certainly worth fixing. With the dial off,you should be able to find the source of the friction. I suspect the 4 lobe cam (is it a chiming movement? If not, then the two lobe cam) on the minute arbor may have a burr or a rough spot that catches the chime (or strike) activating lever. Oil may not be enough to overcome this. It likely needs a little smoothing with some fine sandpaper or emery cloth.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Oiling has not helped. Is this a wear problem?
Could be, when you turn the minute hand do you feel an uneven drag. If yes, look at T2F, this is the second arbor up, driven directly by the center chain wheel. The front of this arbor projects through the front plate and drives the minute hand shaft. When this area is worn it allows the spur drive, and driven, gears to jam against each other. Ie, depthing is to deep. This allows the tips of each gear to have constant contact with the gullets of the mating gear. This causes the rough, almost grinding, feel when you turn the hands.

Fix requires dis-assembly, I like to use a Bergeon bushing here, a little thicker than the plate.

If there is wear evident in several places, probably best to replace.

Hope this helps, Willie X
 

hdmac

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Aug 6, 2011
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Thanks. This is what seems to be happening. Not sure I have the skills or tools to try and fix it. Wish you were in the South Bend, IN area!
-> posts merged by system <-
Thanks. It is a chiming movement (choice of 3) and I may try this since it's nothing but a decorator piece now.
 

hdmac

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Aug 6, 2011
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More on urgos 03015 binding problem

Thanks, Harold, Willie, and Scott. I have now learned enough to be dangerous. Sorry I don't know the proper terminology for the parts but here is what I discovered in layman terms:

The large gear mounted on the time chain shaft meshes with a shaft to its left (looking at the front of the movement). That shaft has a large gear toward the rear that is geared back to the pendelum movement and 2 gears in front of the front plate which appear to turn the hands (small 3/8 in dia gear) and trigger the chime (1-1/2 in dia gear). There is at least 1/32 in of play in the hole where this shaft comes thru the front plate. Pressure from the time chain weight biases the shaft to the right (looking at the front) causing the 3/8 dia gear to mash against the mating gear for about a third of the hourly cycle. When I bias the shaft to the left in the hole, the gears turn freely throughout the hour. Any simple way I can keep the shaft biased to the left? First thought was a teflon string but I don't know how long it would last.
 

harold bain

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Nov 4, 2002
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Re: More on urgos 03015 binding problem

Replacing the bushing is really the only acceptable and reasonably long lasting repair for this problem, and it would require a fair bit of skill, and much time spent learning this craft.
If you have some mechanical aptitude, and lots of spare time, why not learn clock repair?
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Re: More on urgos 03015 binding problem

There is at least 1/32 in of play in the hole where this shaft comes thru the front plate. Pressure from the time chain weight biases the shaft to the right (looking at the front) causing the 3/8 dia gear to mash against the mating gear for about a third of the hourly cycle.
hdma,

This is a common fault in this movement (message #4) and there is usually much wear elsewhere. Not a good movement to start you clock repair learning on. Not unless you see it as expendable ... as it is.

From your ability to describe the mechanics involved, I would say ... have at it. There is really nothing to loose. The badly worn UW03 is worthless now, so the worst you could do is break even on the money and trade some of your time for good repair experience. :)

Willie X
 

shutterbug

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Where abouts on the planet are you? One of us might be close enough to offer our services :)
 

hdmac

Registered User
Aug 6, 2011
8
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0
Could be, when you turn the minute hand do you feel an uneven drag. If yes, look at T2F, this is the second arbor up, driven directly by the center chain wheel. The front of this arbor projects through the front plate and drives the minute hand shaft. When this area is worn it allows the spur drive, and driven, gears to jam against each other. Ie, depthing is to deep. This allows the tips of each gear to have constant contact with the gullets of the mating gear. This causes the rough, almost grinding, feel when you turn the hands.

Fix requires dis-assembly, I like to use a Bergeon bushing here, a little thicker than the plate.

If there is wear evident in several places, probably best to replace.

Hope this helps, Willie X
Now that I have seen the problem, I note that your analysis was right on the money. When I put the movement back in, discovered that the time chain is nearly fully in the "wound" position. How do I reposition the chain? hdmac
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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How do I reposition the chain? hdmac
Take a 12" length of stiff wire, make a small hook on both ends, hook the chain hook with one end the weight on the other and wait.

Make sure the chain is well engaged in the chain-wheel before hanging the weight.

There are other ways but this is the easiest, and probably the best when time is no object.

Willie X
 

hdmac

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Aug 6, 2011
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Take a 12" length of stiff wire, make a small hook on both ends, hook the chain hook with one end the weight on the other and wait.

Willie X
Thanks! I thought of something similar but figured it would be best to check first. I have a klugy fix for keeping the shaft to the left in the worn hole and will be amazed if it works.

hdmac
 

hdmac

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Aug 6, 2011
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Well, my klugy fix has been working all week. It cost about a dime. When it finally fails, I have a 2 dollar fix all designed which should last at least as long as I will. Thanks for the help.

hdmac
 

R&A

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Oct 21, 2008
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Well, my klugy fix has been working all week. It cost about a dime. When it finally fails, I have a 2 dollar fix all designed which should last at least as long as I will. Thanks for the help.

hdmac
I am curios, as to what a klugy fix is :???:

H/C
 

shutterbug

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I think he means the "fix" is functional, but not so pretty.
 

hdmac

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Aug 6, 2011
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I am curios, as to what a klugy fix is :???:

H/C
Well, I'm embarassed to say I took a snelled fish hook and wrapped the nylon snell around the shaft in the worn hole and tied it off so the shaft is biased to keep the spur gear on it from mashing into the mating gear. So far, it's working great.
 

harold bain

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Not a bad idea. It won't hurt the movement, and is easily reversable (unlike some soldered on cures). Might even last at least til the fishing line stretches or breaks.:thumb::thumb:
 

hdmac

Registered User
Aug 6, 2011
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Not a bad idea. It won't hurt the movement, and is easily reversable (unlike some soldered on cures). Might even last at least til the fishing line stretches or breaks.:thumb::thumb:
That's what I thought too. When/if the nylon stretches too much, I plan on using half a bushing held by small wire to replace it in much the same fashion so it, too, will be a reversible fix if necessary. My father-in-law made over a dozen clocks for his kids and grandkids back in the 80's. I am now confident enough to offer to help fix a number of them which have conked out. Really happy I discovered this site and appreciate the help from you folks. Used to visit Whitby occasionally when I worked for Andrew Corp. They had a plant there.
 

harold bain

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Nov 4, 2002
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Used to visit Whitby occasionally when I worked for Andrew Corp. They had a plant there.
They still do, last time I drove by that neighbourhood. I used to service their master clock, back in the 1970's, when I worked for Simplex. Small world:D
 

R&A

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Oct 21, 2008
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Well, I'm embarassed to say I took a snelled fish hook and wrapped the nylon snell around the shaft in the worn hole and tied it off so the shaft is biased to keep the spur gear on it from mashing into the mating gear. So far, it's working great.
Ok Now that is one of the most inventive things I've heard. Not to say I laughed very hard and I hope it works for ever. So now I know it's meaning.
Thank you

H/C
 

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