Printer for Silas Hoadley

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by MikeA, Mar 21, 2020.

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  1. MikeA

    MikeA Registered User
    Old Timer NAWCC Member

    Dec 21, 2006
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    Purchased a WW clock at the last annual in Springfield and am just getting around to cleaning it up, etc.

    The label was printed by Barber and Osborn. Can't seem to find them in Splitters & Bailey. Does anyone know when they were in business? I did find a reference to them in an 1835 State Department listing of printers of the law.

    I will post some pictures of the clock tomorrow when I have better lighting.

    Thanks,
     
  2. Dick C

    Dick C Registered User

    Oct 14, 2009
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    Do a search for BARBER & OSBORN in your favorite search engine....with google it comes up showing that they were a CT printer of laws.

    Also, if you search the NAWCC Watch and Clock Bulletin you will find reference to them.
     
  3. MikeA

    MikeA Registered User
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    Dec 21, 2006
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    Pictures of above clock.

    The label says it has ivory bushings and it does. Obviously someone has decided to put brass brackets to hold the movement in. Also, instead of the expected leather washer, someone drilled two very small holes in the cannon to put in two small pins to hold the hour hand in. Very well done.

    The top glass appears original; the mirror is new.

    Then, the reason I bought it was the glass on the top. Difficult to see in the pictures, but it says "UNION MUST BE PRESERVED." This was some 30 years before the Civil War. Maybe I'm uneducated, but I didn't realize that there were such sentiments that early.

    DSC_0092.JPG DSC_0087.JPG DSC_0086.JPG DSC_0089.JPG DSC_0093.JPG DSC_0091.JPG
     
  4. ballistarius

    ballistarius Registered User

    Oct 26, 2009
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    Mike, other members with more knowledge will tell you more details on your very interesting clock. For the moment, the drills on the hour cannon are original features. Your movement is a short drop one, designed to fit a shorter case (I'm not saying it isn't original to your case) and on those earlier movements, the hour hand had a square hole and was fixed to the cannon by two small brass pins. Later, with round hour cannons, it was possible to move the hour hand around to synchronize striking.
    BTW, I haven't seen many W/W movements here, but yours is the first one attacked by woodworm I've ever seen! Is it dead?
    Regards,

    Aitor
     
  5. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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  6. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Nov 26, 2009
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    That is a pretty neat clock. Could be powder post beetle or termite bore holes in the movement? I wonder if the plates are damaged internally.

    The reverse painted splat on your clock is a great survivor. All of the ones I have seen are on Hoadley's like yours. I once had a Hoadley with 2 reverse painted tablets in the splat. Not as good as yours. They were stenciled gilt florals on an asphaultum background. I have also seen Hoadley's with a stenciled wood insert with that sentiment, too.

    Nothing strange about the sentiments on the splat. I seem to recollect clock labels with that saying, but I'm a bit fuzzy on that.

    The tensions resulting in the American Civil War arose even amongst the Founding Fathers and built up for a long time before the exploding in 1861 with secession and open warfare.

    I do believe it is a variation of what President Jackson and others said in the 1830's.

    jefferson-dinner-1830-l.jpg

    S. Carolina objected to Federal Tariffs leading to the "Nullification Crises" of the early 1830's. Basically a conflict over "state's rights". Pretty amazing that Jackson, a slave owner and Southerner, did not support the state's rights faction of the party.

    So, the tensions that would tear the nation apart were already starting to boil over decades before the start of the Civil War. And just a mere 1/2 century after Independence.

    It would become widely used during the election of 1860:

    1400_Lincoln-Hamlin-Poster.jpg
    I especially like this Kellogg litho from 1861:

    union preserved.jpg

    By 1861, some pretty strong feelings on the topic?

    Your clock is a good illustration of what I have said a # of times. There's so much more to a real antique clock than date, ID and what's it worth. They were material objects that were the product of their time and can teach us something.

    RM
     
    Raymond Rice, PatH and gleber like this.
  7. Andy Dervan

    Andy Dervan Registered User
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    Oct 23, 2002
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    There was only one NAWCC Watch and Clock Bulletin reference - April 2004, Research Column, page 232. Silas Hoadley clock had printer labled "J. Barber New Haven".

    Bob Markowitz is correct Barber & Obsorn apparently did some type of legal printing 1835 - 1838 in New Haven.

    I finally found J. Barber and Barber & Obsorn in a printer listing that I received from Diana DeLucca many years ago. Barber & Osborn supplied labels to Silas Hoalley and J. Barber supplied labels to Silas Hoadley and Symour, Williams, and Porter.

    Andy
     

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