Power reserve

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Willfeel, Sep 11, 2019.

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  1. Willfeel

    Willfeel Registered User

    Aug 21, 2019
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    I have wound the clock exactly five days ago. Eight days of power reserve? I do not think so...

    IMG_20190911_092403.JPG IMG_20190911_092448.JPG
     
  2. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    Need more info... Is it keeping time correctly? What make, model? Is it all original or a new movement? Can the weight be wound all the way to the top?

    Tom
     
  3. Willfeel

    Willfeel Registered User

    Aug 21, 2019
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    It is a new clock, original, bought this year in the month of July, the Hermle model 01131-031171. It advances about three seconds a day and after five days of winding to the maximum it has lowered the weight to where it is seen in the photo. It seems to need one meter more height.
     
  4. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Does it have a chime silencing function at night? The weights should be even if it doesn't silence them at night. When you wind it, do the weights stop by themselves, or do you have to eyeball where to stop them? Can we see a pic of it right after you wind it?
     
  5. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Bad picture also. Looks like a bunch of scrambled eggs up where the dial should be. :)

    Wind the center weight all the way to the top (until it stops) and record the measurement. Set your phone for 24 hours and see how much the weight dropped in 24 hours. Multiply by 8 and this is how much distance the weight (and cable) will have to travel from the wound up position.

    If the clock won't do this distance, you have a problem.

    Same results can be had by simply running the clock for 8 days and seeing what happens. Let us know if that is what you are showing in the photo.

    A clock can stop for three reasons: the weight runs out of cable, the weight hits the floor, or a mechanical fault.

    WIllie X
     
  6. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    Reserve? I would say that your clock would have a one day "reserve". It is designed to wound weekly, 7 days between winds. But at the end of the 7th day there should be an extra day of reserve power left, just in case you forget to wind it on the chosen day. Willie X
     
  7. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    That's what I was thinking too SB. He must have a night shutoff going. These movements have geneva stops, right? The movement is keeping good time so the EW isn't skipping. Maybe the geneva stops need to be reset?
     
  8. Willfeel

    Willfeel Registered User

    Aug 21, 2019
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    When the mechanism is rolled up to the maximum, the weight has a stop and does not go higher. I will take a picture of this end and measure how much it falls each day exactly and how far it is between the weight and the ground. That photo I have put shows what the weight has dropped in five days. Thank you to all.
     
  9. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    That's a good plan. The weight might not be going up to the correct (wound up) position. The pulley usually stops at, or near, the trim board/dial surround.
    Willie X
     
  10. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    And don't forget a pic of the highest position of the weight when it's fully wound. Bruce is on the same thought path, and the stops might be set wrong.
     
  11. Willfeel

    Willfeel Registered User

    Aug 21, 2019
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    I waited two days to make the measurements, I waited for the weights to go down two days and then divide by two, since at this moment I am not living in the place where the clock is. The central weight descends approximately every day about 14 centimeters, I repeat, approximately, and the distance between the weight and the ground is approximately 1 meter. Then in 7 days it will be touching the ground, 98 centimeters, more or less, according to these accounts. This is the photo with the fully rolled movement. Regards.

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  12. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    #12 Bruce Alexander, Sep 13, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
    Ideally all weights would be at the same height when fully wound so the Geneva Stop for the Time Train could stand to be adjusted.
    When the weights are in this position are they very close to the Clock's Seat Board (the board that supports the clock's movement)?

    Edit:
    Short of resetting the Geneva Stop(s), I would suggest that you note the date and time that you fully wind and see exactly how long the clock will run before the weight touches down on the case floor. You may get a full week out of it but not one hour more.

    Regards,

    Bruce
     
  13. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    It would also be helpful if you opened the front door and took photos of the tops of the weights and the pulleys and how far up they go so we can see what it looks like inside
     
  14. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Looking at the pictures, something seems a bit odd to me. The pendulum shouldn't be quite that close to the floor. It makes me wonder if the case has been altered, and is a bit shorter now.
    Willfeel - what is the total height of the whole clock? It should be at least 6 feet.
     
  15. Willfeel

    Willfeel Registered User

    Aug 21, 2019
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    The total height of the clock is 206 centimeters. As soon as I can I will take more photos. Thank you.
     
  16. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Ok. That translates to over 6.5 feet, which sounds normal.
     

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