Post Your U.K. Clocks Here

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by new2clocks, Jul 12, 2009.

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  1. new2clocks

    new2clocks Registered User
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    Includes clocks from England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and Anglo-American.

    Here is my only U.K. clock from Haley and Milner, London, Circa 1800.

    It is my oldest clock and my most accurate timekeeper.

    Regards.
     

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  2. Richard T.

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    H W Williamson, Salisbury, double fusee, 3/4 ting-tang.

    Best,

    Richard T.
     

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  3. Richard T.

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    New Haven Anglo American

    Best,

    Richard T.
     

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  4. Richard T.

    Richard T. Deceased
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    Made in England, inspired by Willard's Roxbury church clock.

    Best,

    Richard t.
     

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  5. Richard T.

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    English skeleton, maker unknown.

    Best,

    Richard T.
     

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  6. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #6 Steven Thornberry, Jul 12, 2009
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2018
    A couple of British United Clock Co.
    BUCC Clock Case.jpg BUCC Clock Small Case.jpg
     
  7. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #7 Steven Thornberry, Jul 12, 2009
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    And a pair of Anglo-Americans, both with New Haven movements.
    One Scroll.jpg Three Scroll.jpg
     
  8. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Astral Coventry 17" Dial clock:

    37.jpg

    Empire Mantle Clock:

    64.jpg

    More photos if you go to my site (link in signature).
     
  9. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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  10. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Thanks Ralph! What eye candy! Wish I could have seen those in person. They're stunning!
     
  11. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

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    Apologies in advance for the lighting, but here is one you won't find every day.

    Circa 1770 oak hooded clock. 30 hour time, and alarm movement with solid brass plates. Appears completely original. The alarm disc was recycled from a lantern clock of maybe 80 years prior, as evidenced by the engraving on the back of the disc (not pictured). Diameter of dial = 6 inches.
     

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  12. MUN CHOR-WENG

    MUN CHOR-WENG Registered User

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    A 2-day marine chronometer by John Poole, # 3364 c.1865.

    Mun C.W.
     

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  13. Larry

    Larry Registered User

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    This a David Munsey, Cambridge Oak Bracket about 1880s. It plays Westminster on gongs and Whittington on 8 bells. I haven't quite finished the case yet but I can see daylight.

    Larry
     

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  14. David Hester

    David Hester Registered User

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    I thought you might be interested in a picture of the dial from another chronometer by John Poole
     

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  15. MUN CHOR-WENG

    MUN CHOR-WENG Registered User

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    Hi David Hester,

    Thanks for posting the picture of the John Poole chronometer dial.

    Do you happen to have pictures of the movement ?

    Mun C.W.
     
  16. David Hester

    David Hester Registered User

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    Hi Mun C.W.

    At the moment I can only find this one that was in a document that I printed for the customer with some details on the auxiliary compensation from Watch and Clockmakers’ Handbook Dictionary and Guide by Britten.
    If I come across anything else I’ll post it, but judging by the quality it’s quite likely I just scanned the movement when I scanned the dial.

    David
     

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  17. Hayson

    Hayson Registered User

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    There have been some nice clocks posted so far but I think this one is worthy of joining their company. It certainly raised my interest as I saw it coming through the door. It is a late Victorian (case has an inscription in pencil dated 1897) Elliott of London 3 train Westminster. The weights are 14 - 20 & 32 lbs for T - S - & C. The pendulum weighs about 8lbs and is a heavy brass shell filled with poured lead. The plates are 4mm thick and the distance between plates is 61mm. I think the moon-phase is the only "extra" but I haven't had a good look yet. The overriding impression as you view and handle this clock is how robust and heavily built it is. But is also well built. I'm no expert so I'd love to hear from anyone who is more knowledgeable. These pics taken in haste as I want to get on with the work :). I can post details and case pictures at a later date if required.
     

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  18. goshop

    goshop Registered User

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    my UK clock
    35.jpg 36.jpg
     

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  19. David Hester

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    Looks like the ones we used to repair a lot of when I was an apprentice back in the late 60's early 70’s.
    If it’s the same model they often had a broken balance staff (EA1 or EA31 if memory serves me correctly).
    They had a funny hanger that made it difficult to get off the wall – might explain the broken staffs.

    David
     
  20. MUN CHOR-WENG

    MUN CHOR-WENG Registered User

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    #20 MUN CHOR-WENG, Aug 6, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2009
    Thank you David for posting picture of the John Poole chronometer movement.

    Below are two pictures of another 2-day marine chronometer, this one by Victor Kullberg ( b 1824 -d 1890) who was born in Sweden but spent the greater part of his working life in London. He was ' one of the most brilliant and successful horologists of the 19th century' according to Britten.

    The chronometer shown s/n 3588 was made in 1876.

    Mun C.W.
     

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  21. Hayson

    Hayson Registered User

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    As no one responded it may be that I am the only one who likes this clock, but I thought I'd post the case pics anyway. Apart from the moonphase , the clock has maintaining power. It plays WM chimes on tuned coil gongs.
     

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  22. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Hayson, I'd say at least two of us like it. A beautiful GF clock. :thumb:
     
  23. David Hester

    David Hester Registered User

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    Yes, a lovely clock, I’ve been trying to find some pictures of one I repaired with a similarly constructed dial.

    David
     
  24. harold bain

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    I've only worked on a couple of Elliot's and found them to be top quality. I believe Elliot was the first company to use tubular bells with their movements.
     
  25. cucoclock

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    #25 cucoclock, Aug 8, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2009
  26. Sooth

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    Hayson, your longcase is certainly breathtaking. The movement is exquisite, as is the case (and condition). I don't think that the lack of comments on it meant that anyone here wasn't a fan of it.

    Cucoclock: Gorgeous bracket clock. I would tend to agree with the approximate date you placed on it. It's not super early, but it's not later than 1850. It's a surprise that such a beautiful clock was not signed either on the dial or on the backplate, especially since the plate edges are engraved.
     
  27. cucoclock

    cucoclock Registered User

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    Hello Sooth,

    I also agree with you. It´s dificult to understand that clock dial was engraved but not signed.

    A friend of mine told me that maybe this clock was the work of a new clockmaker. At the time of this clock was made, clockmakers must came out their works, before to be admited as a clockmaker.

    Clock movement has big quality, and is dificult to understand that is unsigned.

    Anyway, signed or non signed, I´m really happy with this beautifull bracket clock.

    Best regards,
    Miguel
     
  28. Hayson

    Hayson Registered User

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    #28 Hayson, Aug 8, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2009
    Thanks for the comments guys. Miguel, I love the bracket clock. I've worked on similar ones and they are always a pleasure because of the quality construction and workmanship. I make the error of falling in love with clocks I work on which I could never hope to own. At least I get to enjoy them for a short while and I get to know them in a way the owners never do...While we are on the subject of English bracket clocks here is another one.
     

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  29. Burkhard Rasch

    Burkhard Rasch Registered User
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    Here´s mine,nice heavy quality,bought it many years ago.There´s a small No.56 on the back plate,hardly visible.Year of manufacture?
    Burkhard
     

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  30. Hayson

    Hayson Registered User

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    Very nice Burkhardt. Quite similar to an Elliott timepiece I did a few months ago. I would think you are right about the date. Call me stupid but what are the red dial markings?
     
  31. MUN CHOR-WENG

    MUN CHOR-WENG Registered User

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    Clocks with such red band markings on the dial are known as radio room clock. Each band covering 3-minutes each marks the radio silence period ( no radio signal transmission ) which must be observed by all radio stations beginninig at 15 and 45 minutes past each hour so that distress calls sent by others using Morse Code at a radio frequency of 500 kilohertz may be detected .


    Mun C.W.
     
  32. Burkhard Rasch

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    #32 Burkhard Rasch, Aug 10, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2009
    Thanks,Mun to clear that up:I knew it had something to do with ships and radiocomunication,but I didn´t know the exact meaning.
    For me it was interesting to see the"swiss" club foot lever in an entirely english clock instead of the expected English lever allthough the platform is engraved"British made"
    Burkhard
     
  33. Ansomnia

    Ansomnia Registered User

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    Miguel, what your friend probably meant was that the clockmaker was probably still an apprentice or journeyman when he made and sold this clock.

    Clockmakers in the UK still adhered to the guild and apprenticeship systems in the 19C. Strictly-speaking, a clockmaker could only put his name on his work after he finished his apprenticeship. Aside from the maker's name, the signature also identified the shop and location of practice (in case there is a problem). To make clocks in a particular city, a maker had to belong to the local guild and pay his fees. The guild also took responsibility to exert quality control over their members' work. Only qualified makers who finished their apprenticeships were allowed to apply to be members of the guild. So you can see why a signature is more than just putting your name on your work. It was a display of your license to practise in a sense and not anyone could make and sell clocks in a large town with a guild. In a way this system was better than the "fly-by-night" hazards we have today where anyone could sell stuff under some (at times spurious, stolen or copied) trademark signature.

    An apprentice or journeyman had to put in time to "compensate" his master for his training and also perform certain tests of his skills before he could finish his apprenticeship and start his own shop. So it was fair that he should not put his name on any work before he was freed from his apprenticeship.

    BTW, this is a very nice specimen of work from that period, probably by someone who was worthy of being treated as a licensed clockmaker. You are indeed lucky to own it!


    Michael
     
  34. Hayson

    Hayson Registered User

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    Thanks for the dial info Mun.
     
  35. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    #35 Kevin W., Aug 10, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2009
    All nice clocks here.I like the tall case Hayson posted, i know very little about those.But i do know i like the look of them.Bracket clocks are always interesting too.
    Burkhard i like your Astral clock, i would like to find one from the 1940,s as i believe they were used in ww2 by the Canadian and likely British navy.
    Thanks for sharing everybody.I have a couple of Smiths clocks a mantel and a wall clock, not near as old as these posted here.:)

    I found the Astral i would love to have. And it only cost 975.I think the Astral Sooth has shown may have been used by the British navy
     
  36. Dexx

    Dexx Registered User

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    Here's another spring clock that some might find interesting. Unfortunately I do not have a macro for my out of date camera, so the definition is not great - my apologies.

    The clock stands about 15 and three-quarter inches high (without handle). I discovered that there are two initials on the underside of the chapter ring, crudely made with a punch. At first I thought this may be the initials of the chapter ring engraver. But later I discovered what appear to be the same initials scratched on one of the flywheels. So I think they may be the initials of the journeyman who actually assembled and finished the clock. The underside of the chapter ring also has a faintly scratched date of 1756, which fits well with the style of the case, engraving, dial layout, movement and way of quarter repeating. The way of quarter repeating seems almost identical to that of Richard Peckover and John Ellicott. The case has been abused over the years and I have been ruminating over the ethics of having the case restored to its former ebonised glory. The finials, though age-appropriate, are replacements and I feel they do not do anything for the clock!

    We have a chronology of backplate engraving going on in this thread now. The florid engraving on the backplate of this clock later gave way to the sort of engraving on Hayson's spring clock, and this gave way to the sort of engraving on Miguel's clock before backplate engraving fizzled out entirely. Neat :D
     

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  37. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

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  38. Hayson

    Hayson Registered User

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    Another lovely thing. I'm enjoying this..
     
  39. Dexx

    Dexx Registered User

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    Here's another one. When I first acquired this small timepiece, the movement looked like something out of the X-Files. It was grimed in dirt with fossilized rivers of animal or vegetable oil that had oozed out of and down the pivot holes. I assume it must have been an organic oil as there was evidence of dried up mold that had fed on it. This was the first movement I ever dared to dismantle and clean. Several years after I cleaned it, the timepiece still runs well and keeps excellent time - this speaks more to the quality of the clock than to my skills as a servicer!
     

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  40. Dexx

    Dexx Registered User

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    It occurs to me that my posting of images may be misinterpreted. So please let me say that the following photos, as well as the photos in my previous posts on this thread, are offered in the spirit of enthusiasm and sharing, and not as an attempt to brag or outdo other people. I hope these images will be received in the same spirit as that in which they are intended, and that you find them interesting.

    Some background on the clock...

    Like so many clocks of this sort, this one was converted from crownwheel with knife-edge verge to anchor for better timekeeping, and the repeating work was removed, perhaps because night time lighting became cheaper (cheaper candles), because repeating watches became more commonplace and affordable, and because gas lighting started to be laid on in Victorian times. Any or all of these reasons combined would have made the servicing of repeating mechanisms in clocks an unnecessary expense unless you lived in rural areas ( Charles Allix speculates along these lines in the ‘Hobson’s Choice’ book). Repeating work on a clock like this would allow you to hear the hours and quarters in the dark by pulling a chord. In more recent times, the clock has been re-converted to crownwheel (not by me) in an attempt to restore it to how it originally was, but the repeating work has not been restored.

    The clock was made around 1710. It is what’s called a ‘timepiece with silent pull’ because the clock has no strike train. So the clock does not ‘repeat’ any prior struck hour. Rather, it ‘indicates’ the hours and quarters only when you pull a chord, hence the label ‘silent pull’ rather than ‘pull quarter repeat’. This feature makes such clocks useful in the bedroom. The clock is of fairly small proportions, standing at just over fourteen and a half inches high (not including handle) with a seven inch dial. It is ebonized rather than ebony veneered, meaning that a cheaper veneer than ebony has been used and painted black to simulate ebony. I’ve attached ten photos with observations on some of the photos, so the whole forms a brief overview of the clock. I don’t profess to be an expert, so feel free to chip in.

    The photos...

    Photo #1
    Note the atypical carrying handle. It seems to combine 17th and 18th century features. The atypical style leads me to suppose that it may not be original to the clock, although there are no signs that it is not. The escutcheons, however, are definitely not original although they are not reproductions.

    Photo #2
    To the right of the window below the key and in front of the minute wheel you can see a plugged hole in the case. The repeater chord originally ran through this hole but the chord was later threaded through the base of the case.

    Photo #4
    Note the plugged holes at the four corners, indicating that the clock originally had finials. Presumably, these were either removed by an owner as a matter of personal taste, or they were lost. To my eye their absence does not have a negative effect on the visual proportions and I don’t intend to have finials restored to the clock.

    Photo #5
    Note the fancy gothic script of the signature. I’ve looked at a lot of Windmills clocks and although there appear to be a range of fancy signature styles, I have not seen another like this one – it is quite striking and I believe it may be a unique Windmills survivor in this respect. It is a good way of using up the additional space created by the brief fashion for an elongated rectangular dial. You can sense the intentions of the engraver to fill the space in a dramatic way when you contemplate this dial.

    Photo #6
    Note the hole at bottom right near the edge. I believe that this would have originally been where a long flat spring would have been screwed in that extended up along the edge of the backplate to the end of an arbor to which the quarter hammer tail was attached. The spring would have provided power for the action of “pumping” this arbor so that the tail would make contact with different numbers of pins on a pinwheel, depending on how many quarters needed to be indicated.

    Photo #8
    Note the cut-out and threaded hole in the top right pillar. I was not entirely certain what this was for but suspected that it was for attaching hammer springs or hammer stops. A photo that Hayson provided of one of his bracket clocks with what appears to be a similar arrangement seems to support this view.

    Photo #9
    It is sad that so many of these clocks had their repeating mechanisms ripped out. At the left you can see where the repeater spring and pulley were once attached. If you look carefully at the minute wheel you will notice that the stepped quarter cam for pump action has survived. Towards the bottom right a steel post also survives. I am not certain what its function was.

    Photo #10
    The cut-out at top right of centre was for the re-directed repeater chord. In the centre of the seatboard, right underneath the mainspring barrel, there is a curious cut-out indentation with five holes, which you can see easily in this photo of the seatboard out of the case. I have no idea what this was for or what it indicates. The mainspring barrel does not quite obtrude below the bottom of the plates, so the cut-out, as a means of providing necessary clearance for the barrel, seems superfluous. The five holes are shallow and do not extend to the underside of the seatboard. Note the circles surrounding each hole. It almost looks as if some sort of cutting devise that you twirl about an axis was used to do a shallow gouging out of the bottom of the indentation rather than a wood chisel, but this is pure speculation on my part. One wonders if the gut originally used in the clock was a lot thicker than the gut presently used. That might explain the need for such an indentation even when the barrel itself does not quite extend below the base of the plates. Of course, it is possible that the seatboard was replaced when the clock was converted to anchor, although I can see no reason to suppose this. If it was replaced, it is interesting to note that the repeating mechanism would not have been removed at that time and would have been functional when the escapement conversion took place, for otherwise there should have been no need for the cut-out in the seatboard for the re-directed repeater chord. Literature on the subject sometimes gives the impression that repeating mechanisms were ripped out at the time when escapement conversions took place. If the seatboard in this clock is a replacement, it would provide a little evidence that this generalization is unsafe.

    To all those on this side of the border, have a great Labour Day weekend.
     

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  41. Hayson

    Hayson Registered User

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    Interesting photo essay Dexx. Thanks for taking the time.
     
  42. Ansomnia

    Ansomnia Registered User

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    Dexx, thanks so much for taking the time and effort to lay out, photograph and make the write-up on your beautiful bracket clocks. I particularly enjoyed your account of your Joseph Windmills clock. I just started not long ago to learn about these clocks myself and hope to "get lucky" and acquire one of these some day. For now, it is a joy to just admire other people's clock and reading your postings has my day! :thumb:

    I research these clocks on occasion and often come across the issue of restoration. Collectors and experts would likely debate at length about such restorations but IMO restoration is the right thing to do, so long as the restoration work is done with appropriate care and attention to quality and authenticity. I would also like to add that in the case of your Jos. Windmills clock, it was imperative to have its crownwheel verge escapement restored.

    The reason is that it has a slot on its dial centre to display a "mock pendulum". This was a popular feature of the time because the invention of the pendulum in the late 17C was viewed as a marvelous improvement in accuracy and people were fond of drawing attention to the pendulums in their clocks (so much so that longcase clocks were actually originally called "pendulums").

    When later clockrepairers (usually Victorians) messed with these clocks, they swapped the verge escapements for anchor escapements because they felt the added accuracy was preferable to leaving these clocks unmodified. In the process of doing so they often removed anything that was in the way... possible the repeater work in your clock as well as cutting a trough on the bottom of the case (or seatboard) to provide clearance for the longer pendulum.

    In doing so, the repairer also unwittingly ruined the robust nature which the verge escapement had originally imparted these clocks as clocks with verge escapements can be moved around from room to room without worrying about damaged anchor escapement suspensions. These clocks were meant to be portable within the house. For example, taken to bed with. :)

    More importantly though, the pendulums of anchor escapements have much shorter swing amplitudes than short bob (verge escapement) pendulums. Since the mock pendulum display is dependent on the actual swing of the real pendulum, the anchor escapement would have resulted in a laughable mock pendulum action.

    The mock pendulum of your clock was a central feature of the clock so I think a proper restoration simply had to include the restoration of the verge escapement and mock pendulum. Such restorations are very expensive and I think it was fortuitous that your clock was restored to its original escapement.


    Michael

    P.S. Have a nice long weekend! (maybe work on a clock as well?) :)
     
  43. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    WOW. It's the kind of clock I dream of owning. It's a real shame that the repeating works were not kept with the clock (the parts). It could all be redone, but it would not be cheap to do. If it had finials originally, I would think it had the acorn type (fancy). These are still available. I would probably leave the entire clock exactly as-is. I'm curious: do you keep it running?
     
  44. new2clocks

    new2clocks Registered User
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    Hello all,

    Every clock posted to date is a real beauty.

    Thanks for sharing and keep the pictures coming!

    Regards.
     
  45. Kelly

    Kelly Registered User

    Jul 15, 2009
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    No English clocks in my little collection... : a French, a Swiss, a German, and a handful of Americans so far! But I love the ones in this thread. The ornamentation/engraving on the plates especially is just gorgeous.

    I would be very proud to have any of the clocks shown here. And I am happy folks who have 'em are willing to share photos and info with those of us who aren't yet so lucky.

    I do have a question about availability. When I browse various online auctions, I seem to rarely see the English clocks. Is that because they are simply less common in general, or because they aren't common in North America?
     
  46. Dexx

    Dexx Registered User

    Mar 10, 2009
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    Thanks folks for your interest in the clock.

    Hayson, it was no trouble putting these photos and text together. Sharing information and ideas about clocks is a pleasure. I’ve enjoyed reading and contributing to this thread. Anyway, I’m glad you find the photo essay interesting.

    Michael, thanks for the kind words about my bracket clocks. I think you are right about the re-conversion to crown wheel and verge for the very reasons you mention - the central importance of the mock pendulum had not occurred to me although it has been staring me in the face every time I look at the dial. Whoever the restorer was did a nice job of reconstructing the train from the centre wheel up (the spring barrel, fusee and great wheel attached to the fusee are original). However, the bob at the end of the pendulum will, I fear, need to be redone. These bobs originally had a core of wood running through the middle for ease of adjustment. Easy, very fine adjustment is essential because there’s a very narrow ‘sweet spot’, deviations from which have huge and immediate effects on timekeeping – this seems to be particularly so with crown wheel and verge clocks. Anyway, the restorer forgot to create a bob with a wooden core, just a solid brass bob with a screw-thread! Consequently, it is not so easy to make even the minutest of adjustments because the bob is quite stiff on the thread of the pendulum rod, resulting in some stress to the entire pendulum rod and knife-edge verge assembly when you try to turn the bob. That is not supposed to happen. This is something that I will definitely have corrected.

    Sooth, you are right – it would be expensive to have the repeating mechanism restored. I’m certainly not a wealthy person and the only reason I was able to contemplate acquiring a piece like this is because I have been lucky enough to live within walking distance of my place of work. This fact, coupled with an aversion to vacations and extended travel has allowed me to forgo the pleasures of owning an automobile or using public transit – both of which are huge drains on one’s wallet! The money I have saved from avoiding all that has enabled me to fund my hobby. I’m not a “collector” of clocks really because my intention was only to acquire a few interesting pieces and not an extensive collection, my main focus being on building up a library of literature on English horology. I do have the funds set aside should I decide to have the repeating mechanism restored. What prevents me from doing that is not the cost but my lack of understanding of how the mechanism was laid out in this clock down to the last detail, including how the individual components would have been characteristically finished if they had come from Windmills’ workshop/s. When I’ve gained sufficient knowledge of this, I may contemplate having the repeating work restored, or I may leave things as they are, as you suggest. The clock is old but robustly built and meant to work, so I feel that it should be kept in running order and be allowed to run. I do have it running but not all the time. It goes for about eight and a half days. It keeps excellent time – I suspect because everything from the centre wheel up has been reconstructed so there is minimal wear on the components. This situation presumably allows the clock to work at near its optimal performance level and gives you a sense of how it must have performed when new. It keeps to within a couple of minutes over a period of seven days and then the timekeeping deteriorates dramatically!

    Kelly, I think that these clocks tend to come up at auction more in England than anywhere else because this is where most of the interest in them is and because this is where most of the clocks are actually located, making it inconvenient to put them up for auction in other countries even if one wanted to. Earlier clocks are rarer and more sought after. English bracket clocks from the mid to late19th century onwards sometimes come up on ebay though most will be at major auction houses. But earlier bracket clocks (early 19th century and before) with backplate engraving you would only likely find at major U.K. auction houses such as Sotheby’s, Christies or Bonhams. For example, I won the Windmills clock at an auction in London U.K.
     
  47. Paul Regan

    Paul Regan Registered User

    Mar 4, 2003
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    This is a great thread. Thanks to all for sharing. All of my collection is American but I long for an English Bracket Clock and a Chronometer. Paul
     
  48. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Feb 19, 2005
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    Dexx, glad to see that you do run (and enjoy) your clock. I'm of the opinion that well made clocks should be run and enjoyed, and other, more fragile (or rare) clocks (such as an early wooden works - with fragile wooden gears) should be run only on occasion, or not at all.

    As for the wheelwork, you would need to be able to closely inspect and/or photograph and document as many other Windmills clocks as possible to get a feel for how the parts were laid out. This could be a painstaking process, but I'm sure some select private collectors would permit you to do this. I'm sure there are examples in museums as well.
     
  49. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Jan 22, 2002
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    Dexx,

    Nice clocks,... thanks for sharing.

    Ralph
     
  50. Dexx

    Dexx Registered User

    Mar 10, 2009
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    Sooth, thanks for the suggestions about how to kick-start the research. I think
    you’re right that it will be a lengthy process. I don’t have the time to get into it in a big way at the moment, but I’m in no hurry and I suppose that careful, unhurried research is part of the fun. If and when I eventually have the repeating work restored, I’ll arrange it that the restorer allows me to take photos of the restoration process, so that I can post them on this forum for interested folk to look at.
     

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