Post Your Ph. Hauck 400 Day Clocks Here

Karl Burghart

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Re: Hauck Louvre

I picked up this little guy today. Hauck Plate 1632 I believe. The guy I bought it from said that it did not come with a pendulum but got this pendulum from Charles T. as what he thought it should be? I don't see how it could be correct.




SAM_5936.jpg SAM_5939.jpg SAM_5937.jpg SAM_5938.jpg
 

Karl Burghart

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Re: Hauck Louvre

Got the clock today. Here are pictures of the suspension and pendulum. The only marks on the SAM_5962.jpg SAM_5963.jpg pendulum are the suspension spring and cleaning date. No serial number.

Thanks for your inquiry and the photos of your clock. I believe the base originally had a brass-plated steel center cover as do a number of clocks made just before and just after this one. It appears the cover had the center removed, probably due to rusting, and the wood inner core of the base painted to match the support pillars. Although it appears to be well done, I don't believe it is original.

Your dial, on the other hand, is definitely original Hauck. This dial has so far only be found with Hauck clocks. Based on the movement serial number, your clock was made about September-October 1906.

Also, your clock is now the lowest serial number full size movement having the Ph. Hauck Semester Uhr logo stamp. For unknown reasons this was used on full size movements before being used for the 200-Day movements that it was obviously intended to represent.

One question, could you post a photo of the upper suspension bracket? Serial number 14012 has the same movement and the Hauck No. 17 gimbal upper bracket, would like to see what your clock has for comparison.

Final question, is there a serial number stamped on the bottom of the pendulum base? A photo of the bottom will also be appreciated.
 

GT.NZ

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Re: Hauck Louvre

This is the clock that got me started on this addiction. I was about to come home after my father's funeral in 1999 when my stepmother said "Oh, you'd better have you grandmother's clock.' I didn't remember ever seeing it, not even a a child in England in the 1950s. But I spent several hundred dollars on a repairman getting it to run and now it does very well.

If John Hubby or someone can help me date it I'll be grateful. But I can't imagine my grandparents bought it new; they were born in 1901 and 1900.

Glyn
 

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GT.NZ

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Re: Hauck Louvre

I forgot to put the pendulum back before taking the photos!

There's no serial number on the pendulum, not even under the sheet brass insert.
The second photo is the clock in its place on the 400day clock shelf.

Glyn
 

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MUN CHOR-WENG

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Re: Hauck Louvre

239728.jpg 239731.jpg 239729.jpg 239730.jpg
Just picked up this unusual Uhr Semester clock. I'm not sure if the base had the bass covering removed or it came as wood?

The one that I have has an identical dial and movement size, but is fitted with a gallery-free chronometer pendulum and its a full 400-Day variety. The serial number is 107 units higher. I must say we do not know if the main spring length and strength of both clocks are identical.

Both versions were very well made without signs showing the 200-Day version was made with inferior materials as the pictures below show.
2009_10_29 - Philip Hauck.jpg
2015_10_02_Philip Hauck 200-Day.jpg

Mun C W
 

paul830

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Hello, I'm new to the forum. I've read many posts over the years and learned so much from all your knowledge. I picked up what I believe to be a PH Hauck 400 day dome clock. It is stamped with serial number: 1323. I've enclosed several pictures please let me know your opinions. Thanks so much for your help. Paul IMG_0638.jpg IMG_0642.jpg IMG_0646.jpg IMG_0650.jpg
 

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etmb61

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Paul, Welcome to the forum.

You do have a Hauck clock from about 1903. Looks complete and original too (less the suspension wire of course). Very nice.

Eric
 

paul830

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Hi Eric, Thanks for the information. I have the suspension spring and lower block also the original dome. I picked this up at a second hand store for $15.00... When I saw it, I knew it was an old one. How do you guys check the serial numbers? I'm in the process of cleaning it up and getting it running. I've cleaned up a lot of brass and prefer to use a wax instead of lacquer. I have never had good luck with spraying lacquer. Thanks for your help.
 

etmb61

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Wow $15! I'm always on the lookout for a find like that. As for the numbers, Mr. John Hubby has conducted most of the research and cataloging that gives us the dates for these clocks.

Great find!

Eric
 

John Hubby

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Re: Hauck Louvre

I've been quite busy for a few weeks and need to catch up on all the new clocks posted in this thread. I'll comment on each as we go and see how this works.

r72gsaol posted his fancy shield dial Hauck earlier that I identified as the lowest serial number (14007) full-size movement documented to date that is stamped with the Hauck "Semester Uhr" logo. Everyone should note this is "not" a 200-Day movement. So far this makes six full-size clocks found with the Semester Uhr logo, all made either just before the quite smaller 200-Day movement started production or during the first month or so it was made. I had asked for photos of the upper bracket and pendulum that are shown here:
Got the clock today. Here are pictures of the suspension and pendulum:
240069.jpg 240070.jpg The only marks on the pendulum are the suspension spring and cleaning date. No serial number.
The pendulum is one of two 6-pillar gallery disc models used by Hauck from startup in 1903 until the introduction of pendulum No. 6 temperature compensating "chronometer" design and No. 19 5-pillar gallery model from the April-June quarter of 1906. After that, this particular pendulum with a relatively small diameter gallery is found being used in smaller numbers through 1907 and sparsely after that. The other design has a much larger diameter gallery with thick gallery discs that we will see later with Paul830's clock.

Mun C. W. then posted a comparison of this clock with one he has that is nearly identical, although with the earliest example documented so far of the Hauck No. 6 pendulum, this one without a gallery:
The one that I have has an identical dial and movement size, but is fitted with a gallery-free chronometer pendulum and its a full 400-Day variety. The serial number is 107 units higher. I must say we do not know if the main spring length and strength of both clocks are identical.

Both versions were very well made without signs showing the 200-Day version was made with inferior materials as the pictures below show.
247953.jpg
247954.jpg

Mun C W
My main comment here is that to the best of my knowledge the mainsprings for both clocks should be identical in size and strength. The only actual difference between the two movements is the presence of the Hauck Semester Uhr logo on one and not the other. Otherwise both movements are the same. And, both are quite beautiful clocks!

Next, we'll look at r72gsaol's new acquisition:
I picked up this little guy today. Hauck Plate 1632 I believe. The guy I bought it from said that it did not come with a pendulum but got this pendulum from Charles T. as what he thought it should be? I don't see how it could be correct.

239916.jpg 239919.jpg 239917.jpg 239918.jpg
This one with serial number 15324 is a Semester Uhr 200-Day clock and was very early in 1907, about in the middle of the production run of these interesting clocks. The pendulum "is" a Hauck, model No. 19 with the narrow 5-pillar gallery. However, it isn't correct, being made for a standard size clock made in 1908 or later. What should be there is the miniature version of the same pendulum that looks like pendulum No. 18 in the Repair Guide but with a very small 5-pillar gallery.

This is the clock that got me started on this addiction. I was about to come home after my father's funeral in 1999 when my stepmother said "Oh, you'd better have you grandmother's clock.' I didn't remember ever seeing it, not even a a child in England in the 1950s. But I spent several hundred dollars on a repairman getting it to run and now it does very well.

If John Hubby or someone can help me date it I'll be grateful. But I can't imagine my grandparents bought it new; they were born in 1901 and 1900. Glyn

36502 Front-Dome.jpg 36502 Front.JPG 36502 Dial.jpg 36502 Mvmt Back.jpg I forgot to put the pendulum back before taking the photos!

There's no serial number on the pendulum, not even under the sheet brass insert.
The second photo is the clock in its place on the 400day clock shelf.

Glyn
Glyn, thanks for posting! Based on the serial number, your clock was made right at the middle of 1912. The pendulum on your clock is the same design as the incorrect one on r72gsaol's Semester Uhr model. There is one feature on your clock that doesn't appear in Haucks made before 1911. This is a modified gimbal design that has the gimbal pivots screwed in through holes in the gimbal yoke instead of just pins riding on notches. This solved the "lost gimbal and suspension" problem. Also, there may also be an eccentric for the front plate pivot of the escape wheel arbor, first noted in late 1908.

Finally we'll see what new member Paul830 has posted for us to see.
Hello, I'm new to the forum. I've read many posts over the years and learned so much from all your knowledge. I picked up what I believe to be a PH Hauck 400 day dome clock. It is stamped with serial number: 1323. I've enclosed several pictures please let me know your opinions.

250136.jpg 250138.jpg 250139.jpg 250140.jpg 1323 Mvmt SN.JPG Thanks so much for your help. Paul
Paul, welcome to the NAWCC Message Board and thanks for posting your clock photos! As already noted by Eric you have a very early Hauck, made near the end of 1903 based on the movement serial number. 1903 was Hauck's first year of production, their first clocks being made about mid-year. Yours appears to be complete and original. I described the pendulum with your clock above and it can be seen that while the disc appears quite similar to the one with the narrower gallery, this callery is quite massive by comparison. So far I've not found any correlation as to why one or the other was used but will keep looking for clues. Your clock will clean up quite nicely, keep us posted on your progress as you get it restored.
 
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paul830

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Re: Hauck Louvre

Hi John and thank you for the welcome and all the information on my Hauck torsion clock. I'll keep you posted as to the progress. Thanks again, Paul
 

jkfabulos

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Re: Hauck Louvre

Sale price was $500 plus 21% juice so total was $605 and depending on where you live sales tax. This doesn't include packing and shipping of at least another $100.
It was interesting and probably scarce in this form.
 

etmb61

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Re: Hauck Louvre

Sale price was $500 plus 21% juice so total was $605 and depending on where you live sales tax. This doesn't include packing and shipping of at least another $100.
It was interesting and probably scarce in this form.
That's a low considering the chronometer pendulum. I'd say someone got a good deal.
 

Karl Burghart

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Re: Hauck Louvre

Next, we'll look at r72gsaol's new acquisition:This one with serial number 15324 is a Semester Uhr 200-Day clock and was very early in 1907, about in the middle of the production run of these interesting clocks. The pendulum "is" a Hauck, model No. 19 with the narrow 5-pillar gallery. However, it isn't correct, being made for a standard size clock made in 1908 or later. What should be there is the miniature version of the same pendulum that looks like pendulum No. 18 in the Repair Guide but with a very small 5-pillar gallery.
No luck finding a small semester uhr pendulum. Does anyone have the dimensions of the disc? I am going to make one on the lathe, It won't be right but it will look close enough for now.

Thanks,
Karl
 

pollythecat

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Re: Hauck Louvre

For the records I have a couple of Ph. Hauck 400 day clocks. This one is serial number 26717 the chronometer style pendulum is un marked.
DSC_4654.JPG DSC_4656.JPG DSC_4660.jpg DSC_4661.jpg

The other serial number:- 34439 once again the pendulum is un marked.
DSC_4662.JPG DSC_4663.JPG DSC_4664.jpg DSC_4665.jpg

The pendulum has a black mark where a monkey had fitted a steel washer to slow the clock down, I removed it but the stain would not budge.
 

John Hubby

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Re: Hauck Louvre

For the records I have a couple of Ph. Hauck 400 day clocks. This one is serial number 26717 the chronometer style pendulum is un marked.
Polly, thanks again for posting your clocks, and congratulations on the superb results you obtain in restoring them. This one was made right at the end of 1909 and has Plate 1607 with no logo or other identification, as well as the typical Hauck upper suspension bracket No. 17 as shown in the Repair Guide.

The chronometer pendulum No. 6 in the Repair Guide is shown as being by Hauck, one of the few items that was not incorrectly identified as by Ph. Haas. However the c. 1894 date is completely wrong since Hauck started operations in 1903 and the patents for this design are all early 1906. Three versions have been documented for this pendulum; first has the same chronometer disc but no gallery, just the pendulum hook above the disc. Next was your version with a 5-pillar gallery as shown in the patent drawings and with two balance weights mounted on the bimetallic arms of the disc. The third is a smaller diameter miniature version that was used for the 200-Day "Semester Uhr" clocks made from the end of 1906 into the first half 1907.

I have also seen the large version with four of the balance weights mounted on the disc arms; but am not certain this was a factory option. To day only two have been documented; I suspect the additional two weights were put there by someone who didn't have a thinner suspension spring.

The other serial number:- 34439 once again the pendulum is un marked.

The pendulum has a black mark where a monkey had fitted a steel washer to slow the clock down, I removed it but the stain would not budge.
This clock also has Plate 1607 with no identification marks and was made right at the end of 1911 based on the serial number. It has the same upper suspension bracket but a much larger dial than the first clock.

The pendulum is No. 19 as illustrated in the Repair Guide, incorrectly shown there as by Phillipp Haas. This pendulum design was introduced at the same time as pendulum No. 6, both sharing the identical small diameter 5-pillar gallery. Two versions of this pendulum were made for the full-size clocks, the first having a solid turned brass disc with a rather wide rim. The second version is the one you have that has a stamped steel inner support with formed brass sheet over the outside and the inside of the disc also being covered cup with a stamped brass sheet. The later design would have been significantly less expensive to make considering the quantity of brass used for the turned disc version. A miniature version of this pendulum was also made for the 200-Day Semester Uhr clock.

Regarding the stain on the bottom of the disc, I use 4-0 steel wool with a good paste brass polish to remove that kind of stain. That usually does the trick but on occasion I've had to resort to 300 grit wet or dry emery paper follow by the 4-0 steel wool. I leave the underside with the matte finish provided by the steel wool.
 

Karl Burghart

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Re: Hauck Louvre

I picked up this little guy today. Hauck Plate 1632 I believe. The guy I bought it from said that it did not come with a pendulum but got this pendulum from Charles T. as what he thought it should be? I don't see how it could be correct.




239916.jpg 239919.jpg 239917.jpg 239918.jpg

I've got the clock restored and running. I came up with a very well made reproduction pendulum at the Eastern States Regional. I've been using a tumbler to polish the parts and it's very effective 24 hours and the parts are bright and shiny again.

SAM_8357.jpg SAM_8358.jpg SAM_8359.jpg
 

etmb61

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Here is 13518 for the record. I picked this up just for the parts. Apparently this movement was originally in a 4 glass case. The bottom corners of the front plate are rounded off to fit inside a bezel, and the mounting holes for a pediment are marked but not finished. This one has the screws to mount a tubular suspension guard. It also came with the thumbscrew used to fix the dial into the bezel. The case must have been damaged because there is nothing wrong with the movement. Such a shame.

Eric

1.jpg 3.jpg
 

John Hubby

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Eric, by any chance is there a Grivolas serial number with star stamped on the left edge of the back plate? This movement is within the serial number range of the last Hauck movements purchased by Grivolas for their "German" Grivolas clocks, which were all used to mount in crystal regulator cases. Based on the serial number it was made about August 1906.
 

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r72gsaol said:
I picked up this little guy today. Hauck Plate 1632 I believe. The guy I bought it from said that it did not come with a pendulum but got this pendulum from Charles T. as what he thought it should be? I don't see how it could be correct.
View attachment 265593 View attachment 265596 View attachment 265594 View attachment 265595
I've got the clock restored and running. I came up with a very well made reproduction pendulum at the Eastern States Regional. I've been using a tumbler to polish the parts and it's very effective 24 hours and the parts are bright and shiny again.
Very late response, was flooded out just four days after your post, fortunately most all of my collection wasn't affected.

You did a very nice job restoring, and the replica pendulum is perfect for your clock. It was made near the beginning of 1907 within what appears to have been the third of four production "batches" of these 200-Day Clocks. Hauck extolled their virtues as being more accurate than their 400-Day clocks since you had to wind them twice yearly, however that claim was not borne out by actual performance. I estimate only about 500 of these clocks were made, which puts them in the "scarcely found" category for collectors. Not rare but getting close.
 

etmb61

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Eric, by any chance is there a Grivolas serial number with star stamped on the left edge of the back plate? This movement is within the serial number range of the last Hauck movements purchased by Grivolas for their "German" Grivolas clocks, which were all used to mount in crystal regulator cases. Based on the serial number it was made about August 1906.
John, There are no extra numbers on the edges of the plates. The nearest number I've recorded to this one is 13506 which had a Urania dial.

Information on Urania Four Pillar Clock

Eric
 
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John Hubby

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Kamil, thanks for posting the photos of this very interesting Hauck clock. The very low serial number immediately raised questions in my mind as to whether it was made during the same time frame as the Hauck miniatures that I believe were the first clocks made by Hauck. As it turns out, another Hauck with the same movement as the clock you posted and having serial number 463 has just been found but cannot be posted yet.

Actually, this is nothing less than incredible!! I've been documenting Hauck clocks for over 20 years and had not seen any full-size movements made with serial numbers lower than 935. Now we have two with very close serial numbers, this one 476 and the other that I mentioned being 463. It is notable also that the back plates of these clocks, while quite similar to Plate 1610, are NOT the same. The third wheel pivot for these two clocks is planted 3 or 4 mm higher than the fourth (center) wheel pivot, whereas for all clocks with Plate 1610 and later the two pivots are on the same horizontal line.

Also of interest is that these serial numbers fit precisely between the early Hauck rectangular plate miniatures (Plate 1599A) and round plate miniatures (Plate 1631).
NOTE that the illustration for Plate 1599A in the Repair Guide is much too large and completely wrong. The actual plate size is 2 inches x 2-3/4 inches.
The miniatures in my Plate 1599A data have serial numbers from 16 to 433, the Plate 1631 clocks are from 513 to 895. There may be some overlap with these standard size movements on either side that will come to light, but it certainly now appears that Hauck first produced the rectangular plate miniatures, then these standard size models (that have a slightly different plate layout from later production as noted above), then the round plate miniatures, then the standard Plate 1610 design clocks, for which the lowest serial number found so far is 935. All this occurred within the second half of 1903.

This is very significant if it holds true, I've held my breath for 20+ years to make this discovery, hope it isn't another twenty before we find more examples of all these clocks. It has been more than two years since I have added a "new" miniature of either movement type to my database.

Back to the clock Kamil posted, the case is identical to a Grivolas model No 212 4-Glass crystal regulator design as illustrated in the Grivolas 1910 400-Day catalog. I have found this case in earlier (1902) clocks made by Huber, and later (1905) associated with "German Grivolas" clocks, indicating it was made by a third party case maker, not at all unusual. The pendulum is identical to those used by Hauck for clocks with serial numbers 935 and higher, so I have concluded it is likely original.

The dials on the two clocks mentioned herein are identical, having an enamel dial with scalloped floral garland inside the Arabic chapter numbers and having spade hands. My data show the first use of this dial design was with Huber movements made for Bowler & Burdick in early 1902. That was followed by Hauck with these clocks made in 3rd quarter 1903 when they were starting their first production, and then by JUF and Würth at the end of 1904, both for their own clocks and for B&B as well. We know that the B&B dials were made in the U.S. by B&B, but it seems they were quickly copied in Germany. All of them documented thus far that were used from early 1902 to the end of 1906 are fitted to movements in 4-Glass crystal regulator cases of various designs.
 
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Kamil Urbanowicz

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Dear John , what do You mean that plate 1599A is a miniature. It looks in the 400 book like a standard plate movement, but different to the one presented on pictures above? Please can You share some pictures of the early rare round movement Hauck and a rectangular early plate clock.
 

John Hubby

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Dear John , what do You mean that plate 1599A is a miniature. It looks in the 400 book like a standard plate movement, but different to the one presented on pictures above? Please can You share some pictures of the early rare round movement Hauck and a rectangular early plate clock.
Kamil, you may have missed my note above that says "NOTE that the illustration for Plate 1599A in the Repair Guide is much too large and completely wrong. The actual plate size is 2 inches x 2-3/4 inches." The actual rectangular plate is 1/8 inch shorter than the diameter of the round plate model, Plate 1631. Here are some photos, first the rectangular plate model and then the round plate:
16 Front.JPG 16 Mvmt Back Plate.JPG 826 Front.JPG 826 Mvmt Back.JPG The rectangular plate model (Plate 1599A) has been documented only with glass domes, mainly on turned marble bases. This one is only 7-1/2 inches tall to the top of the finial from the table. The back plate of the movement, as seen in the second photo, is only 2 inches wide by 2-3/4 inches tall (5.1 cm x 7 cm). The pendulum is only 2-1/2 inches diameter and the dial is 1-3/4 inches diameter.

The round plate version has been found either in miniature 4-Glass crystal regulator cases or miniature 4-post Louvre (bandstand) models. This one in the third photo is 8-1/2 inches tall, the dial is 2-3/8 inches diameter and the pendulum is identical to the one used for the rectangular plate version.

NOTE the train layout is essentially identical for the two movements, and the parts are interchangeable. These have adjustable pallet Graham escapements. Also note the configuration of the click and ratchet. This design is identical to the design used by Hauck for their "Semester Uhr" 200-Day movements that were made in 1906-1907, except that the Semester Uhr movements have a ratchet bridge where these have only a taper pin through the winding arbor to hold the ratchet gear in place.

At this time I have documented 8 rectangular plate clocks and 10 round plate models. I place them in the "very scarce" category, not quite rare. Just for info, my classification for "Rare" is for there to be less than five known examples. "Very Scarce" is from 6 to 20, "Scarce" is 21 to 50. right now these two Hauck standard size clocks being discussed would be "rare" as we know of only two at the moment.
 

Kamil Urbanowicz

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John, thank You very much for pictures of this totally early Ph Hauck clocks (small rectangular plate and round movement). Thats good to know that there is still some interesting clocks too look around :)
 

mjstewart

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Actually, this is nothing less than incredible!! I've been documenting Hauck clocks for over 20 years and had not seen any full-size movements made with serial numbers lower than 935. Now we have two with very close serial numbers, this one 476 and the other that I mentioned being 463. It is notable also that the back plates of these clocks, while quite similar to Plate 1610, are NOT the same. The third wheel pivot for these two clocks is planted 3 or 4 mm higher than the fourth (center) wheel pivot, whereas for all clocks with Plate 1610 and later the two pivots are on the same horizontal line.
I have just come into possession of this clock 2 days ago. I think it might be the Hauck serial number 463 that you mentioned John. However I do have some questions about it. 1) The pendulum appears to be Jahresuhrenfabrik #21 (thus explaining why I thought I was getting a Jahresuhrenfabrik clock, 2) I don't know what to think about the serial number appearing to b superimposed upon a different number 3) is there a matching plate in the Terwilliger guide?

Hauck1.png Hauck2.png Hauck3.png Hauck4.png Hauck5.png Hauck6.png Hauck7.png Hauck8.png
 

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MJ, thanks for posting the photos of SN 453 Hauck. Interesting to see that the serial number has at least the first number over-stamped and possibly the second digit as well. At the time these were being made the serial numbers were being stamped by hand, and it really isn't uncommon to find over-stamped numbers. I think you are right that the original number was a "3", but I can't really say what the second one was IF it is actually over-stamped. I've put a note about this in my database, but my "convention" when I find over-stamped numbers is to record the last number stamped as being the correct one.

Regarding pendulum No. 21, it actually was not invented or made by JUF. We don't know for certain who actually designed this pendulum, but the first documented use was by Andreas Huber when he started making 400-Day clocks in late 1896. Huber then used only pendulum No. 21 until he invented the Pendulum No. 10 twin-loop temperature compensating pendulum. Even then, No. 21 is found on the large majority of Huber clocks. Huber stopped production of 400-Day movements in early 1904, instead buying movements and complete clocks from JUF, Hauck, and Kienzle.

JUF also used pendulum No. 21, as did Ph. Hauck. Hauck, as seen for this clock, used this pendulum from 1903 to 1905 for a number of their clocks, although the majority of their clocks had their own design disc pendulum. JUF started using the No. 21 around 1898, then by1902 used it for most of their clocks until the end of 1904. After that they had their own simpler design.

Both JUF and Hauck also used pendulum No. 10 under license from Huber, JUF from 1902 to mid-1907 and Hauck from 1903 to mid-1906.

From my research I believe your clock is complete and original including the pendulum. I have the identical clock model documented that was made just a few months later, serial number 1166, that also has pendulum No. 21.
 
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mjstewart

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MJ, thanks for posting the photos of SN 453 Hauck. Interesting to see that the serial number has at least the first number over-stamped and possibly the second digit as well. At the time these were being made the serial numbers were being stamped by hand, and it really isn't uncommon to find over-stamped numbers. I think you are right that the original number was a "3", but I can't really say what the second one was IF it is actually over-stamped. I've put a note about this in my database, but my "convention" when I find over-stamped numbers is to record the last number stamped as being the correct one.

Regarding pendulum No. 21, it actually was not invented or made by JUF. We don't know for certain who actually designed this pendulum, but the first documented use was by Andreas Huber when he started making 400-Day clocks in late 1896. Huber then used only pendulum No. 21 until he invented the Pendulum No. 10 twin-loop temperature compensating pendulum. Even then, No. 21 is found on the large majority of Huber clocks. Huber stopped production of 400-Day movements in early 1904, instead buying movements and complete clocks from JUF, Hauck, and Kienzle.

JUF also used pendulum No. 21, as did Ph. Hauck. Hauck, as seen for this clock, used this pendulum from 1903 to 1905 for a number of their clocks, although the majority of their clocks had their own design disc pendulum. JUF started using the No. 21 around 1898, then by1902 used it for most of their clocks until the end of 1904. After that they had their own simpler design.

Both JUF and Hauck also used pendulum No. 10 under license from Huber, JUF from 1902 to mid-1907 and Hauck from 1903 to mid-1906.

From my research I believe your clock is complete and original including the pendulum. I have the identical clock model documented that was made just a few months later, serial number 1166, that also has pendulum No. 21.
Once again, thank you for taking the time to share your knowledge on these clocks. For the record, with my magnifier it looks like 463 stamped over 553 for the serial number. This is very exciting for me! To date my collection has ranged from "collectable" to "hey it looks pretty when it spins". I'm looking forward to making this one spin too.
Mike
 

Kamil Urbanowicz

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Aug 17, 2010
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Thanks for adding this picture mjstewart of the second early Hauck. Please can You make pictures of higher resolution (higher quality) as this ones are very low quality.
 

mjstewart

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Thanks Kamil, I knew there was something wrong there. My Ipad wasn't playing nice. I will repost them here.
Good news, inside the barrel is a clearly stamped number 463 so I take that as the honest to goodness serial number. Bad news is the barrel is full of green gunk and a mainspring fractured into 3 pieces. Would I be right in assuming that the 19x36 spring listed for plate 1610 as a good fit?


Hauck1.JPG Hauck2.JPG Hauck3.JPG Hauck4.JPG Hauck5.JPG Hauck7.JPG Hauck8.JPG Hauck9.JPG
 

John Hubby

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Thanks Kamil, I knew there was something wrong there. My Ipad wasn't playing nice. I will repost them here.
Good news, inside the barrel is a clearly stamped number 463 so I take that as the honest to goodness serial number. Bad news is the barrel is full of green gunk and a mainspring fractured into 3 pieces. Would I be right in assuming that the 19x36 spring listed for plate 1610 as a good fit?
Mjstewart, thanks for posting the higher resolution photos, much appreciated! Also pleased that you found the "483" serial number stamped in the mainspring barrel, you are correct that would be the actual clock serial number.

Sorry for the slow response, but regarding your question about the mainspring, the 19 X 36 would be the correct spring for your clock.
 

John Hubby

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Here’s my PH, number 433.
Peter, thanks for posting! This is a really nice example of the Hauck miniature with rectangular plates.

I posted earlier that these were the very first clocks made by Ph. Hauck to the best of my knowledge, when they started production around second quarter 1903.
 

mauleg

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Hauk Serial #32089; "89" is stamped inside the mainspring barrel and enscribed on the mainspring barrel cover; more details about restoration here:

20180815_034908.jpg 20180815_035833.jpg
 

Bod

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Hi, another for the collection. 9.JPG 1.JPG 2.jpg Can you spot the problem?
All the major parts are stamped 91, the pendulum is handwritten with the serial number in an old fashioned script, which looks original.(29091)
There are 3 different menders marks on the base of the pendulum, so it's been worked on in it's history.
4.jpg (Tips on how to rotate picture appreciated)
The anchor arm has been bent. Is this screwed or glued in?
The clock came to me with no suspension, but via E bay, a gimbal from Australia, fork from India, and a suspension from the USA, it's now working!
A 0.0034 suspension only allowed it to run at -1 hour per day, a 0.0040 suspension now has it within adjustment range.
The clock has been in storage wrapped in damp white paper, which caused light rust on the pinions, now removed.
Should this be a good runner, later in the summer, a strip down and polish will happen.

Bod
 

etmb61

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Hi, another for the collection. View attachment 522715 View attachment 522716 View attachment 522717 Can you spot the problem?
All the major parts are stamped 91, the pendulum is handwritten with the serial number in an old fashioned script, which looks original.(29091)
There are 3 different menders marks on the base of the pendulum, so it's been worked on in it's history.
View attachment 522722 (Tips on how to rotate picture appreciated)
The anchor arm has been bent. Is this screwed or glued in?
The clock came to me with no suspension, but via E bay, a gimbal from Australia, fork from India, and a suspension from the USA, it's now working!
A 0.0034 suspension only allowed it to run at -1 hour per day, a 0.0040 suspension now has it within adjustment range.
The clock has been in storage wrapped in damp white paper, which caused light rust on the pinions, now removed.
Should this be a good runner, later in the summer, a strip down and polish will happen.

Bod
Hi Bod,

I believe the anchor pins are threaded in on these. I have one with a broken pin to deal with and it looks like it has a thread left at the bottom. My movement number is 17377 for reference.
pin.jpg

I don't know if they changed with later clocks.

The moderators can rotate your pictures, but most photo viewers have a rotate feature. It depends on what you are using.

Nice clock.
Eric
 
Last edited:

Bod

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Mar 10, 2019
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Hi Eric
That useful to know, the anchor arm likely threaded, now the difficult questions-
The arm diameter is 1.94-2mm, what is the thread specifications?
What length should the arm be? Mine appears to be have been shortened.
At present the clock is running well, I'm very hopeful that it will regulate well, in it's current condition, so I'm tempted to leave alone, the information will be useful should repairs be needed.
The photos were rotated in my computer, but inserting here they reverted to the camera layout. I'll try better with any other photos.
All I know about this clock, I have gathered from this Forum, so many many thanks to all who have contributed.
I bought this clock, because it had a disc pendulum, rather than the usual 4 balls, reminding me of a clock in childhood, and was cheap! Plastic dome, (better than nothing) knew it was missing the suspension wire, but not the Gimbal, education followed.
I have a copy of Horolovar 400day clock repair guide, 10th edition, (which I have corrected as necessary, for Haas/Hauck) which has proved very useful.

Bod
 

etmb61

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Hi Bod,

I had to take a survey of my Hauck clocks. The anchor pin should be about 20mm long. All of mine have the appearance of having been sheered off on the top end rather than having a turned finish. I can't tell you the thread size, there was no standard back then, but it should be the same as the small screws that secure the pallets to the anchor.

I agree if it works don't fix it!

For rotating pictures, you have to use a program that actually alters the image data. The Microsoft Windows Photo Viewer in one such program. You can usually tell because the program will save the image when you exit or move to another picture. Other viewers, like Picasa for example, will rotate the picture view but do not change the image data.

Eric
 

Bod

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Mar 10, 2019
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Thanks zzippy, that's the only place I could find one, came from Australia, for a German clock, in the UK.
The clock is now running, and being checked for time keeping, currently at less than 5 minutes per 14 days.


Bod
 

etmb61

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This is number 2438. Nothing unusual, early large gallery disc, sold by Bowler and Burdick.

2438_front.jpg back.jpg dial.jpg plate.jpg

It's missing a few bits but otherwise in good shape. I didn't really "need" another Hauck but I have the prior clock number 2437 shown here:

New addition Hauck

Just couldn't pass on it.

Eric
 

KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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Cool that you found two clocks next to each other in serial numbers! From your other thread, the date on these are early 1900s?

I also noticed that the two clocks have the taper pins holding the between plate pillars in place are on opposite sides of the plates. That can't be a factory thing...must be the previous owner. And the dials are different...I would have thought they would be slapping the same dial on them as they went through assembly.

Kurt
 

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