Post Your Ph. Hauck 400 Day Clocks Here

Randy Beckett

NAWCC Member
May 23, 2012
2,555
25
38
Mt. Pleasant, Tx
Country
Region
Re: Early Haas with a strange pendulum

A very attractive and interesting clock you have. Even though it is a marriage, it looks as good or better to me than any of the complete clocks that the components came from. I know you are proud of it, and should be. I feel it would be a front-runner favorite in a "Post your Favorite Marriages" thread if we had one. It would get my vote. Thanks for sharing.
 

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
46,961
1,996
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
Re: Early Haas with a strange pendulum

Thanks, John. Should #72 on page 40 also be changed to Hauck? Same plate, different design?
 

AndyDWA

Registered User
Dec 26, 2013
617
1
18
Western Australia
Country
Region
Re: Early Haas with a strange pendulum

Wow! If the base is made of wood, how is that highly-reflective finish achieved? Is that something that can be replicated by the hobbyist or is it complicated?
 

etmb61

NAWCC Member
Oct 25, 2010
2,859
295
83
Mascoutah, IL
Country
Region
Re: Early Haas with a strange pendulum

Andy,

The base has a brass rim around a wood core.

Eric
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Re: Early Haas with a strange pendulum

Thanks, John. Should #72 on page 40 also be changed to Hauck? Same plate, different design?
Actually not. It "is" a JUF, but the back plate shown is incorrect. That clock is from the Horolovar Collection and the actual movement has Plate 1051A, but with threaded holes for a suspension guard that aren't shown in the RG illustration. Another example of incomplete transfer of info from the actual clock to the book, both for the #72 photo and the Plate 1051A illustration.
 

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
46,961
1,996
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
Re: Early Haas with a strange pendulum

thanks, John!
 

Ada

Registered User
Aug 15, 2011
66
0
6
Country
Region
Re: Help needed with a P.Hauck clock please

Well it's finished at last! After a complete strip-down of the movement, cleaning in the ultrasonic bath, polishing, fitting a new horolovar mainspring and re-assembling, the clock now runs beautifully with over 360 degrees of pendulum rotation.

After taking advice regarding the dial from members on this forum, I proceeded to ultrasonically clean the dial as previously stated then applied 10 very thin coats of acrylic varnish to seal it from further dirt and dust ingression into the crack on the dial. Although not perfect it has made it almost invisible to the eye and also at the same time, I have retained the original dial though I could do nothing about the elongated centre hole.

So with a new movement mounting plate and repaired dial, I am very pleased with the end result :D. I don't know how old this clock is but it has a serial number of 22005. Some pictures of the finished clock below.

Once more I'd just like to thank everybody who has inputted and contributed. Many thanks.
 

Attachments

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Re: Help needed with a P.Hauck clock please

Adrian, congratulations on your "resurrection" of a very nice Hauck clock. Well done! To answer your question regarding age, based on the serial number your clock was made about 3rd quarter 1908, so it's going on 106 years young.
 

KingJohn

New Member
Apr 7, 2014
3
0
0
Re: Jahresuhrenfabrik 400 day clock date

Eric, at this time I have no validated JUF clocks with serial numbers under 50000. The lowest number I have recorded is 50235, I presently project the first one with a serial number was 50001. The highest number recorded to date is 165771, my estimate is that it is unlikely any number higher than 170000 exists, giving a nominal total production of 120,000 clocks with serial numbers. In the separate thread on JUF pendulums, a comment is made that they could have started at the 50001 level, representing actual total production to that time. I think that could be quite reasonable provided it doesn't include any of their other types of clocks made in much larger numbers than the 400-Day clocks.

By the end of 1887 about 6,000 clocks had been made under the Harder patent, about 1100 per year average over the five years 1883-1887. During the period 1888-1895 my estimate is a production rate not exceeding 1,500 clocks per year or an additional 12,000 clocks. From 1896-1900 their production was significantly reduced to around 900 clocks per year because Andreas Harder started production using the Harder patents and shut JUF out of the US and UK markets for those years, thus an additional 4,500 clocks and we're up to 22,500 clocks. From 1901 through 1905, JUF ramped up their production from 2,000 in 1901 to nearly 7,000 in 1906, adding 31,500 clocks. I believe the serial numbering started in late 1906, and by the end of 1907 they had produced serial number 62000 just before the introduction of upper suspension bracket No. 15, the "C" gimbal, which had been patented by Huber in December 1907. This projection would confirm that serial numbering was started around 50001, in 3rd quarter 1906. Subsequent production based on confirmed serial numbers gives this a good fit.

This projection will cause some of our dating in the years 1906-1910 to be shifted forward somewhat, but after 1910 no change has been noted or anticipated.
The number on my clock is 16460. There is no manufacturer's mark but a 0 above the number. Would that date my clock to about 1893?
 

Kamil Urbanowicz

Registered User
Aug 17, 2010
280
16
18
Re: Jahresuhrenfabrik 400 day clock date

Hello King John if You clock have a number 16460 and a 0 above it is not an Jahresuhrenfabrik but it is probably and Ph Hauck clock. Please can You add a pictures of it?
 

KingJohn

New Member
Apr 7, 2014
3
0
0
Re: Jahresuhrenfabrik 400 day clock date

Thank you Kamil for your reply.
Firstly I must say that I know nothing about clocks!
Looking at an extract from Mervyn Passmore's Identification of Anniversary Clocks my clock doesn't have the 'distinctive two arm suspension support' or round top block.
The suspension system looks like a little brass brick on top with two screws into the side and a single screw into the frame below. It also has the distinctive curved up at the bottom '7' on the face.
I'll try and get a picture but I'm not very clever with cameras and have even less success uploading the results!
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Re: Jahresuhrenfabrik 400 day clock date

Thank you Kamil for your reply.
Firstly I must say that I know nothing about clocks!
Looking at an extract from Mervyn Passmore's Identification of Anniversary Clocks my clock doesn't have the 'distinctive two arm suspension support' or round top block.
The suspension system looks like a little brass brick on top with two screws into the side and a single screw into the frame below. It also has the distinctive curved up at the bottom '7' on the face.
I'll try and get a picture but I'm not very clever with cameras and have even less success uploading the results!
KingJohn, welcome to the NAWCC Message Board and thanks for posting your inquiry. I agree with Kamil that you have a Hauck clock, they are the only maker known to have stamped the extra "0" above the serial number. Based on the serial number and presuming it "is" a Hauck, your clock was made about mid-first half 1907.

Also, there were a significant number of these clocks with the extra "0" that did not have the Hauck gimbal upper suspension bracket No. 17 shown in Passmore's book, but instead have the suspension you have described and yours is within the documented group. This suspension bracket was also used by Hauck for all their full-size clocks made from their startup in second half 1903 until the Hauck gimbal was introduced in August-September 1906. It is a close variant of upper suspension bracket No. 5 illustrated in the Horolovar Repair Guide on page 202. That one is shown to be a Gustav Becker, however at least four makers used virtually the identical bracket including GB, Huber, Hauck, and JUF.

Please do post photos, if you have difficulty posting let us know and I will make arrangements so they can be shown.
 

Kamil Urbanowicz

Registered User
Aug 17, 2010
280
16
18
Re: Jahresuhrenfabrik 400 day clock date

John its definitely the Ph Hauck clock, mistakely named Phillipp Haas in 400 repair book. But I dont know why I can not see the bigger pictures?

Kinds regards
Kamil
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AndyDWA

Registered User
Dec 26, 2013
617
1
18
Western Australia
Country
Region
Re: Jahresuhrenfabrik 400 day clock date

If you right-click on the small image and choose "View Image", you can change the address by deleting "&thumb=1" from the end, then press Enter and it will show the large image. That will do until John or another mod comes along and fixes things :)
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Re: Jahresuhrenfabrik 400 day clock date

I think I got there in the end!
KingJohn, thanks for the photos of your clock. No question is is a Hauck and made at the time I posted in my earlier reply. Have you checked the bottom of the pendulum to see if it has a serial number scribed, stamped, or written there? Many Hauck clocks have the matching serial number of the movement found on the clock, which shows the pendulum and the rest of the clock started life together. Also, please post some detail photos of the pendulum (side and bottom of the disc) to help document whether it is a Hauck pendulum.

I am moving all the posts about this clock to the "Post Your Ph. Hauck 400-Day Clocks Here" thread for archival purposes and further discussion. We will look forward tothe additional photos.
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Here is my Ph. Hauck c1904 Plate 1607 SN 23167. Any more information would helpful... purchased in USA.

Thanks again,
Andy, thanks for posting your Hauck clock photos. I apologize for the long delay in responding, but would like to offer that you have a very nice example of the "standard" Hauck glass dome clock made in the latter half of Hauck's production history. Based on the serial number, your clock was made near the end of 1908 and appears to be complete and original.

Do you have photos of the pendulum, side and bottom? There may be a serial number written, scribed, or stamped on the bottom of the pendulum disc, if there and it matches the movement serial number then you can be reasonably sure the pendulum is original to the clock.
 

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
46,961
1,996
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
Re: Early Haas with a strange pendulum

I have a clock that looks just like this one. As I was bringing it home the wire broke. I was told it was a Phillip hauck.

Post a pic of the back plate of the clock. We'll let you know which suspension spring you need :)
 

Ingulphus

Registered User
May 29, 2006
725
3
18
Oakland, CA
Country
Region
Hauck Louvre

I just received this; the serial number is 25294, and the suspension bracket is the earlier type, with the top block on pivots. I was on tenterhooks until it arrived from Germany, but the seller was diligent in his packing and it arrived unscathed. The dome may not be original, but it seems a perfect fit.

The name and address on the dial refers to a Belgian daily journal called "Novellity", which published the arrivals and departures of guests at the "main hotels" in Brussels; it commenced business in 1907 at the Avenue de Merode address, and I know that there was at least one other Hauck Louvre with the same name and address on the dial, so perhaps they purchased a number of these as promotional gifts to the hotels. I'm guessing that the clock dates to circa 1909.

My question is: what is the correct pendulum for this? The other clock had the compensating "chronograph" type, so I'm assuming that would be correct for this one as well.

Afterthought: I realized, too late, that I should have posted this in the Hauck thread. Perhaps the moderator could move it there for me?

Best regards to all,

Mark

Hauck Louvre 1.jpg Hauck Louvre 2.jpg Hauck Louvre 3.jpg Hauck Louvre 4.jpg Novellity.jpg
 
Last edited:

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

Mark, thanks for posting your Hauck Louvre! I've moved your post to the Hauck thread so it will be together with the other Hauck clocks.

You've estimated the correct date for the clock, my data show it was made in 2nd quarter 1909. I tried to find more info about the Novellity journal but so far unsuccessful. I would expect it to have been in operation for a few years so the 1909 date for this clock isn't out of school for the 1907 date in the article you posted.

Hauck made relatively few Louvre model clocks, I think in part because they really didn't gain all that much popularity until after WWI. You won't find many by any other maker in that pre-war time frame. So far I have only nine examples in my data including yours. The earliest was made in late 1906 and the latest in 1914. One characteristic shared by all the Hauck Louvres documented to date is the use of relatively large diameter single fluted columns for the five supports.

Note that even though the last two Louvres documented have the No. 26 3-Ball pendulum, that one is not appropriate for your clock since it was patented two years after your clock was made.

With regard to the Hauck gimbal upper suspension, the design change to use screws through the gimbal yoke instead of pins resting in notches on the yoke was made in 2nd quarter 1911 about two years after your clock was made. Once the change was made that became the standard.

Here is a summary of the pendulums associated with the nine clocks I now have in my data:
  • 1906: Two clocks, both with a six-pillar gallery pendulum, matching serial numbers. These were made about the same time the both the Hauck No. 6 Chronometer" pendulum and the Hauck five-pillar narrow gallery Pendulum No. 9 was introduced, but didn't have either of those.
  • 1907: No Louvres documented
  • 1908: One Louvre documented, has the No. 6 Chronometer pendulum
  • 1909: Three Louvres documented, first has the No. 19 narrow five-pillar gallery Hauck Pendulum, the other two have no pendulum.
  • 1910: No Louvres documented
  • 1911: One Louvre documented, has the No. 6 Chronometer pendulum
  • 1912: One Louvre documented, has the No. 26 3-Ball Hauck pendulum DRGM 471231 granted June 1911.
  • 1913: One Louvre documented, has the No. 26 3-Ball Hauck pendulum DRGM 471231 granted June 1911.
  • 1914: No Louvres documented
You mention you know of one more with the same dial inscription as your clock that has a No. 6 pendulum. I'm guessing it was made in the same time frame as your clock so we might say that the No. 6 was the "favorite" within that period being that three of the four clocks found with pendulums made from 1908 to 1911 have that pendulum.

Note that even though the last two clocks in my data have the No. 26 3-Ball pendulum, that one would not be appropriate for your clock since it didn't exist in 1909, being patented two full years later.
 

Ingulphus

Registered User
May 29, 2006
725
3
18
Oakland, CA
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

John -

Thank you (as always) for sharing your knowledge. I didn't realize Hauck Louvre models were uncommon! I will ask the owner of the other Hauck Louvre if I may post photos of it and the serial number for your database. That clock was severely damaged in shipment and sold as parts.

Best regards,

Mark
 

Ingulphus

Registered User
May 29, 2006
725
3
18
Oakland, CA
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

John -

Here are the photos of the other "Novellity" Hauck Louvre; the owner, Michael Kiss, did not record the serial number before he sold the clock, but mentioned that it is marked indistinctly on the pendulum that he retained; I have purchased that pendulum from him, and will attempt to decipher the number when it's in my possession.

The odd base was apparently a lamp base re-purposed by the previous owner, who had cut the clock's base to accommodate a shelf (!)

010.JPG 009.JPG 008.JPG pendulum.jpg

Hauck Loubvre - trim detail.jpg

The trim is interesting; instead of being a stamped brass strip, it has a three-dimensional, overlaid aspect, although that was difficult to photograph clearly (the last photo is from my clock).

Best regards,

Mark
 

Ingulphus

Registered User
May 29, 2006
725
3
18
Oakland, CA
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

John -

The pendulum from Michael Kiss's Hauck "Novellity" Louvre arrived; the serial number on the bottom of one of the curved brass weights is 23483, although it's faint. Would that put it in 1908 or 1909?

Best regards,

Mark
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

John -

The pendulum from Michael Kiss's Hauck "Novellity" Louvre arrived; the serial number on the bottom of one of the curved brass weights is 23483, although it's faint. Would that put it in 1908 or 1909?

Best regards, Mark
Mark, thanks for the photos and info on this second "Novellity" Louvre model clock. The movement serial number shows it was made right at the end of 1908, about 4 or 5 months before your clock was made. These two clocks would show the Novellity magazine was still going strong for at least two years after the article date that was mentioned about what they did.
 

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
46,961
1,996
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Clock Age

A full swing takes around 7.2 seconds at a quick check. It would be nice to know what it should be.
I think it should be right at 8 turns per minute, Greg. FYI, most 400 day clocks run at either 8 or 10 turns per minute (exactly).
 

water

New Member
Jan 19, 2015
4
0
0
Country
Re: Hauck Clock Age

Hello everyone. Purchased at auction These clocks. The seller says it's Philip Haas. I would be grateful for any information about these hours, year, manufacturer, and so on. Thank you all.

68f148af9823t.jpg dd5a3991c0fbt.jpg 50729b51b28et.jpg 7b09c011d6f4t.jpg
 

Attachments

etmb61

NAWCC Member
Oct 25, 2010
2,859
295
83
Mascoutah, IL
Country
Region
This is 17377 for the record. The pendulum has the six pillar gallery.

It has the typical "features" I tend to attract: broken finial (from shipping), broken anchor pin, and bent pendulum hook.:bang:

1908?

Eric
 

Attachments

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Clock Age

Hello everyone. Purchased at auction These clocks. The seller says it's Philip Haas. I would be grateful for any information about these hours, year, manufacturer, and so on. Thank you all.
Water, thanks for posting the photos of your Ph. Hauck clock. This movement of your clock has Plate 1607 from the Repair Guide, however the additional "0" above your serial number is not shown on that illustration. We don't know what is the significance of the extra digit, however Hauck stamped that on almost all the clocks made from early 1907 to about mid-1908. Plate 1607 is shown as being made by Phillipp Haas, however that has been proven to not be correct and all plates in the Repair Guide now shown as Phillipp Haas were in fact made by Philipp Hauck.

Your pendulum is correct, being No. 19 as illustrated in the Repair guide. There are two versions of this pendulum, the first having the disc turned of solid brass as is yours, and the second having a stamped steel inner core covered with a thin brass sheet also formed to the steel, and then a stamped inner cover that is permanently fixed by crimping the outer cover over the bottom rim.

Based on the movement serial number your clock was made in the October-December quarter of 1907. It appears to be all original except for the upper suspension block and gimbal, which are home made replacements. Replicas of the originals are available online if you wish to replace the one there now.
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
This is 17377 for the record. The pendulum has the six pillar gallery.

It has the typical "features" I tend to attract: broken finial (from shipping), broken anchor pin, and bent pendulum hook.:bang:

1908? Eric
Eric, thanks for posting. Your clock also has the extra "0" above the serial number and in your case the clock was made about mid-1907. Aside from the glitches from shipping, it appears your clock is complete and all original. That particular small gallery 6-pillar pendulum was used as original equipment from 1903 up to the time your clock was made, and they also used one with a much larger diameter gallery from 1902 to the end of 1906. Actually you have the highest serial number in my data for a clock with this small gallery pendulum. Is there a serial number on the bottom of the disc?

Their 5-pillar gallery No. 19 was introduced in April 1906 at the same time as their "chronometer" style temperature compensating pendulum No. 6 and those rapidly replaced the earlier 6-pillar gallery versions.
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
This is 2960 for the record. 1903?

I was wanting a Bowler & Burdick Co. clock.

Eric
Eric, you got one alright. It's one of a large number of clocks Hauck sold to Bowler & Burdick as complete clocks from late 1903 into the first half of 1904, most of which didn't have the "Anniversary Trade Marke Registered" stamped on the back plates. Yours was made in the January-March quarter of 1904, just before they started stamping the B&B logo. It has Plate 1610 which is incorrectly shown in the Repair Guide being made by Jahresuhren-Fabrik. I believe Terwilliger thought that because the click and ratchet bridge layout was almost identical to the early JUF clocks that it was made by JUF. However, this plate layout was Hauck's basic design from the start of their standard size clock production about 2nd quarter 1903 until mid-1905.

By mid-1904 the B&B trademark was noted on all the clocks sold to them by Hauck, Plate 1007 and variants thereof represent what was supplied. Hauck continued the B&B business only to the end of 1905 based on my records.

The pendulum on this clock has the large diameter gallery I mentioned in my earlier post on your other Hauck. This design evidently was used only by Hauck as I've not found it on any other maker's clocks.
 
Last edited:

etmb61

NAWCC Member
Oct 25, 2010
2,859
295
83
Mascoutah, IL
Country
Region
Eric, thanks for posting. Your clock also has the extra "0" above the serial number and in your case the clock was made about mid-1907. Aside from the glitches from shipping, it appears your clock is complete and all original. That particular small gallery 6-pillar pendulum was used as original equipment from 1903 up to the time your clock was made, and they also used one with a much larger diameter gallery from 1902 to the end of 1906. Actually you have the highest serial number in my data for a clock with this small gallery pendulum. Is there a serial number on the bottom of the disc?

Their 5-pillar gallery No. 19 was introduced in April 1906 at the same time as their "chronometer" style temperature compensating pendulum No. 6 and those rapidly replaced the earlier 6-pillar gallery versions.
Hi John,

Thanks for the info, there is no number on the pendulum.

As for being the highest numbered six pillar in your data, check this post:

https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php...ay-Clocks-Here&p=685892&viewfull=1#post685892

Eric
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Hi John,

Thanks for the info, there is no number on the pendulum.

As for being the highest numbered six pillar in your data, check this post:

https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php...ay-Clocks-Here&p=685892&viewfull=1#post685892

Eric
Eric, good observation. When I documented that clock 2+ years ago somehow I entered info that it had the 5-pillar gallery Hauck disc. Edit made, so Damian's clock now has the highest serial number with one of these small 6-pillar gallery pendulums.
 

etmb61

NAWCC Member
Oct 25, 2010
2,859
295
83
Mascoutah, IL
Country
Region
Eric, you got one alright. It's one of a large number of clocks Hauck sold to Bowler & Burdick as complete clocks from late 1903 into the first half of 1904, most of which didn't have the "Anniversary Trade Marke Registered" stamped on the back plates. Yours was made in the January-March quarter of 1904, just before they started stamping the B&B logo. It has Plate 1610 which is incorrectly shown in the Repair Guide being made by Jahresuhren-Fabrik. I believe Terwilliger thought that because the click and ratchet bridge layout was almost identical to the early JUF clocks that it was made by JUF. However, this plate layout was Hauck's basic design from the start of their standard size clock production about 2nd quarter 1903 until mid-1905.

By mid-1904 the B&B trademark was noted on all the clocks sold to them by Hauck, Plate 1007 and variants thereof represent what was supplied. Hauck continued the B&B business only to the end of 1905 based on my records.

The pendulum on this clock has the large diameter gallery I mentioned in my earlier post on your other Hauck. This design evidently was used only by Hauck as I've not found it on any other maker's clocks.
John,

Thanks for the info, I'll add it to the clock's history.

The next clock I have pictures of after mine is 3071 (from ebay). It does have the B&B stamp on the back like plate 1007.

Eric
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
John,

Thanks for the info, I'll add it to the clock's history.

The next clock I have pictures of after mine is 3071 (from ebay). It does have the B&B stamp on the back like plate 1007.

Eric
In my data the clock with serial number 3071 is just before the first one with the B&B stamp I had previously, serial number 3153. Is the eBay link still working? If not you would need permission of the seller to post the photos here, but a description of the clock would be OK.
 

etmb61

NAWCC Member
Oct 25, 2010
2,859
295
83
Mascoutah, IL
Country
Region
In my data the clock with serial number 3071 is just before the first one with the B&B stamp I had previously, serial number 3153. Is the eBay link still working? If not you would need permission of the seller to post the photos here, but a description of the clock would be OK.
John,

No, that auction was in mid 2012. At that time, 3071 was on a wooden base with red velvet top and brass trim as was common with other early makers, but with Hauck columns and finials like 2960. It had the same dial markings and pendulum type as 2960, but used plate 1007. 3071 was missing the pediment, the hands were oversized, mismatched, and poorly fit, and the suspension bracket had part of a later (50s?) bracket installed to hold a later type suspension top block.

Eric
 

EliTom

Registered User
Nov 20, 2008
89
0
6
Birmingham - England
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

so here is my Hauck

just rebuild it this weekend - see my other thread looking for tips !

and it has been running now for about 18 hours without stopping

still needs some work however - needs a new torsion spring - just need to check through old threads for the correct spring to order.

Also I need to source a little grub screw for the threaded bar that goes through the centre of the pendulum - anyone any idea of the size .... M1.0 or M1.5?

and can anyone give me a better idea on the date of manufacture - serial number appears to be 15904 and I have posted a pic of the underside on the pendulum disc - it is machined solid brass with a loose lead insert - don't know if the lead insert is original or not - also the pendulum disc has no number on it - is that good or bad?

EliTom
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
77
0
Calif. USA
Re: Hauck Louvre

You should order some brass pins for the corners.
Having all 4 corners is also a good safety issue.
If one falls out, thing won't explode( I'd think ).
A longer spring will slow it some, putting the adjusters
in better range.
Tinker Dwight
 

Ingulphus

Registered User
May 29, 2006
725
3
18
Oakland, CA
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

I would recommend steel pins, rather than brass, to fix the back plate to the posts. Brass pins are too soft, and can distort when trying to remove them, making it difficult to get them out without damaging the post. Steel pins, even if they should break off close to the post, can easily be removed by soaking the post and plate in a supersaturated solution of alum and water - it will eat away the steel and leave the brass untouched. And steel pins were what the the manufacturers used when producing the movements.
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

so here is my Hauck

just rebuild it this weekend - see my other thread looking for tips !

and it has been running now for about 18 hours without stopping

still needs some work however - needs a new torsion spring - just need to check through old threads for the correct spring to order.

Also I need to source a little grub screw for the threaded bar that goes through the centre of the pendulum - anyone any idea of the size .... M1.0 or M1.5?

and can anyone give me a better idea on the date of manufacture - serial number appears to be 15904 and I have posted a pic of the underside on the pendulum disc - it is machined solid brass with a loose lead insert - don't know if the lead insert is original or not - also the pendulum disc has no number on it - is that good or bad?

EliTom
EliTom, thanks for posting the photos of your Hauck clock. Great job of cleaning and polishing! Based on the serial number your clock was made in 1st quarter 1907. It is one of a group of full size movement clocks that have the extra number "0" stamped above the serial number. These have been found from serial number 15138 made at the beginning of 1907 to number 21496 made in early third quarter 1908. Statistically these represent about 85% of the movements made in that period. The others made in that time include a number of Hauck's "Semester Uhr" clocks at the beginning of 1907 and the balance being similar clocks but without the extra "0". At this time I have no indication what this may have represented.

I don't know the size of the adjusting rod set screw but will check later and report what I find for a similar clock.

The lead disc on the bottom of your pendulum is "not" original. It was added because someone a good while back didn't want to take the time to thin the suspension spring and needed to slow down the clock. Even when old, I remove these and install a spring of the right size to bring the clock to time. You mention there is no serial number on the pendulum, I presume that includes underneath the lead disc? Even if it doesn't have a number that doesn't mean the pendulum isn't original. This design was used by Hauck for about two years from 1905 to 1907. It is essentially identical to a disc pendulum used by JUF in the same period although JUF used it from 1904 to about 1912. We believe that most disc pendulums were generally made and supplied by third party jobbers thus we see the same pendulums on different maker's clocks. These have been confirmed by matching serial numbers.

I agree with Mark's comments regarding the use of steel pins instead of brass for holding your movements together. Steel should also be used for holding the dials in place, and any other usage where you are locking brass parts together. The brass pins "will" gall and then you will need to cut off the excess to disassemble and drill out the remaining portion from the posts.

On the other hand, if you are locking parts together on steel posts or arbors you should use brass pins for the same reasons.
 
Last edited:

EliTom

Registered User
Nov 20, 2008
89
0
6
Birmingham - England
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

Again many thanks for the detailed reply

and yes I have just noticed it still has only two pins - I just used two pins as soon as I got the back plates together - the other two are still in a small plastic bag - but will go into the clock now :) The pins are original I guess and steel!

I have a new suspension spring on order - should be here today or tomorrow (0.0038") so will try that with an without the lead weight under the pendulum.

I am in two minds whether to attempted a repair to the main spring barrel - Posted pics in this post https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?123325-Mainspring-bulge-failure

Maybe I will just run it with minimal winding - on the other hand it would be nice to get it back to near original.

I can get an arbour made at work but do not want to risk cracking the barrel - what would the consensus of best method - small hammer with a wood / metal block or try and press it for more even force?

EliTom
 

John Hubby

Senior Administrator Emeritus
Staff member
NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Life Member
Sep 7, 2000
12,294
241
63
The Woodlands, TX
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

Just picked up this unusual Uhr Semester clock. I'm not sure if the base had the bass covering removed or it came as wood?
Thanks for your inquiry and the photos of your clock. I believe the base originally had a brass-plated steel center cover as do a number of clocks made just before and just after this one. It appears the cover had the center removed, probably due to rusting, and the wood inner core of the base painted to match the support pillars. Although it appears to be well done, I don't believe it is original.

Your dial, on the other hand, is definitely original Hauck. This dial has so far only be found with Hauck clocks. Based on the movement serial number, your clock was made about September-October 1906.

Also, your clock is now the lowest serial number full size movement having the Ph. Hauck Semester Uhr logo stamp. For unknown reasons this was used on full size movements before being used for the 200-Day movements that it was obviously intended to represent.

One question, could you post a photo of the upper suspension bracket? Serial number 14012 has the same movement and the Hauck No. 17 gimbal upper bracket, would like to see what your clock has for comparison.

Final question, is there a serial number stamped on the bottom of the pendulum base? A photo of the bottom will also be appreciated.
 
Last edited:

Karl Burghart

NAWCC Member
Jan 30, 2012
204
22
18
Ballston Spa, NY
Country
Region
Re: Hauck Louvre

Thanks John,

I should have it in a few days, I'll post the photos once I get it. The outer part of the base is also wood. Would that have also has a brass covering?
 

Forum statistics

Threads
167,152
Messages
1,456,555
Members
87,340
Latest member
Jerrydodge
Encyclopedia Pages
1,057
Total wiki contributions
2,914
Last edit
E. Howard & Co. by Clint Geller