Post Your KOMA 400 Day Clocks Here

alovir

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Schlenker & Posner case married with KOMA movement?

The following text was translated using a translation program .
German - English

This clock caught my interest as I found out that it
obviously is a mariage.

The facts
The case bears an engraving which points to the year 1932.
The movement and the pendulum are made by KOMA.
The 400 Day Clock Repair Guide says that production
of KOMA Anniversary Clocks starts at 1950.

You can see the original clock made by Schlenker&Posner
in "The Torsion Times" Vol. XII No.4 page 21
However, it is incorrectly designated as KUNDO.

The pendulum of KOMA in my Clock fits in my opinion, visually
better to the "Art Deco" as the pendulum made by SuP.

Of course it would be best if the Clock is not a mariage.

The last two photos will give You a look on a few clocks of my collection.

Thanks for Your replies
 

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John Hubby

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Re: Schlenker & Posner case married with KOMA movement?

The following text was translated using a translation program .
German - English

This clock caught my interest as I found out that it
obviously is a mariage.

The facts
The case bears an engraving which points to the year 1932.
The movement and the pendulum are made by KOMA.
The 400 Day Clock Repair Guide says that production
of KOMA Anniversary Clocks starts at 1950.

You can see the original clock made by Schlenker&Posner
in "The Torsion Times" Vol. XII No.4 page 21
However, it is incorrectly designated as KUNDO.

The pendulum of KOMA in my Clock fits in my opinion, visually
better to the "Art Deco" as the pendulum made by SuP.

Of course it would be best if the Clock is not a mariage.

The last two photos will give You a look on a few clocks of my collection.

Thanks for Your replies
Alovir, thanks very much for posting the photos of this "marriage" and also those of your collection clocks. Before addressing the question of this SuP/KOMA clock, it would be very much appreciated if you could post each of your collection clocks separately so they can be documented for our research, especially any of them that have serial numbers such as the GB, Kundo, Junghans, etc. Photos of the back plates and other details would be very much appreciated!

The SuP/KOMA clock raises some very interesting questions. There are now five Schlenker & Posner (SuP) clocks having this identical 4-post case that are doucmented in my SuP database, including the one you point out that was mis-identified in The Torsion Times. For info, at the time that photo was published we did not know that SuP even existed and were using (incorrect) information from the Repair Guide. Now that we do know, all of the five in the database have properly identified SuP movements with serial numbers between 26,000 and 31,500, which would say they were made in 1934 and 1935.

Your clock having an inscription date in 1932 would have had a movement with a serial number in the range of 18,000 to 22,000 if in fact it was completed and sold as a SuP clock.

What makes your clock especially interesting is that I have documented two other clocks with the same identical case but also with the identical KOMA movements and pendulums such as your clock has. These two clocks and all the SuP clocks have the same dial and hands as well. However, the dial on your clock is different from all the others but certainly could be original to the 1932 vintage case. The KOMA movements were made about 1950 and have Plate 1647 in the Repair Guide. I own one of these, and it appears completely original so I have assumed that the case was "new old stock" from the 1930's; since at the time I bought my clock I already knew about two of the earlier SuP clocks with the same case. In the instance of your clock, I think it is quite possible that KOMA somehow acquired the case without a movement together with the others including mine in which they mounted their own movements. Photos of my clock are attached below so you can see it is identical to yours.

One thing we need to keep in view, is that specially designed cases such as for your clock (and the others like it that have been documented) were nearly always made by a third party and sold to anyone who would buy them. I suspect it is quite likely that not all of the cases of this design were purchased by SuP and then were acquired by KOMA after WWII. The case for your clock might have been one that was ordered by SuP with the inscription, but then for some reason not taken by them.

We may never know for certain but I think that your clock may not be a marriage but was assembled by KOMA at the same time as my clock and the other that I have documented. It happens that the case has a 1932 inscription, but that could be explained as I have proposed above.
 

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alovir

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Re: Schlenker & Posner case married with KOMA movement?

John, thanks for the detailed information.
For many years I was sure, having a marriage.
But I like this clock, knowing also it was rare.
Few month ago I had the idea to restore the original
state of the clock - because I have both,
the matching movement and pendulum, but
You have convinced me that the clock is original.
Presumably, the engraving was only made to a
earlier manufacturing fake.

Detailed photos of my other clocks will follow.
Should I send it directly to you?
 

shutterbug

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Re: Schlenker & Posner case married with KOMA movement?

Detailed photos of my other clocks will follow.
Should I send it directly to you?
No, please post them here so all can enjoy seeing and learning :D
 

John Hubby

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Re: Schlenker & Posner case married with KOMA movement?

Alovir, please post each of your clocks individually in separate threads here on the forum. That will provide a record of each one as well as to allow comment from our users appropriate to each clock. Thanks in advance for posting!
 

any400day

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I have recently found that many early KOMA clocks (wide plates) have serial numbers stamped on the INSIDE of the back plate and also on the inside of the front plate, near the bottom.

Will appreciate your checkin all your wide plate KOMA's and let me know what you find. A serial number with matching clock photo will be MUCH appreciated.
John,

I have taken the liberty to start this thread so that we can keep track of Koma clocks. After checking about ten clocks with wide plate movements, I only found two with serial numbers marked on the inside of the plates. The hands on both these clocks are held by a pin instead of a nut.

SN 4149
Backplate 1647

Pictures attached.

Vic
 

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any400day

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Another for the data-base.

SN 6488
This clock was just sold on German Ebay. The hands are again held by a pin and the movement support plate has two big holes punched on it. Round base is also the earlier version like shown in SN 4149 & 5292. It is quite similar to SuP base but don not have the "rope" knurling on the top. Later clocks (with hands nut) use a different base which is quite similar to Kundo clocks.

Vic
 

John Hubby

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John, I have taken the liberty to start this thread so that we can keep track of Koma clocks. After checking about ten clocks with wide plate movements, I only found two with serial numbers marked on the inside of the plates. The hands on both these clocks are held by a pin instead of a nut.
Vic, thanks very much for your initiative! This has already added three more clocks to the KOMA serial number data, your two plus the one posted by Matthias. Thanks to you both for the photos and info. I had seen and documented the clock on eBay, it was my question to the seller that revealed the clock had a serial number. It is interesting that it is identical to Matthias' clock; I know of one other like these two for which I have requested the serial number.

The following commonality for KOMA serially numbered clocks appears to be emerging from the data thus far:
  • The clocks all have wide plates.
  • Serial numbers are stamped inside both the front and back movement plates.
  • The movement support plates have two large holes.
  • The hands are held on with taper pins.
  • Round bases are similar to SuP or JUF but without the ribbing around the top rim.
  • Some parts are very similar or identical to SuP, such as some dials and hands, the support column finials, and certainly the square dome "Louvre" model including all parts except the movement and pendulum.
It will be very interesting to determine the approximate number of clocks made with serial numbers, at this point the highest serial number is under 10,000.

As this goes forward we should be able to identify characteristics of the clocks that don't have serial numbers, which could help point to when the practice was stopped. I have a few ideas already but won't post yet until more data has been accumulated.

For information, I'm attaching photos of the clock with serial number 4100, which started my earlier effort to identify and document these clocks. Until recently I had only five clocks in the data but now am approaching twenty.
 

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MUN CHOR-WENG

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[Originally posted by John Hubby:

It is interesting that it is identical to Matthias' clock; I know of one other like these two for which I have requested the serial number.
]


Hi John,

I do have a similar clock. I post below pictures of that clock together with close-up shots showing details of the serial number 10063 found inside the front and back plate.

This number would probably be the highest s/n recorded to date for these early KOMA. Interestingly the movement support plate of this clock does not have the two large holes that you mentioned in your post.

I also have another KOMA but with an earlier serial number 6762
( pictures shown below).The movement support plate does have the two large holes. These holes were probably absent in later models such as the one mentioned above.

Mun C.W.
 

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John Hubby

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Mun, thanks very much for posting your clocks, two more for the database! The 10063 serial number "is" the highest yet documented so we can now say there were more than 10,000 made with serial numbers. Good info!

I'll comment on each of the clocks separately:

The 10063 clock:

This one has some differences from the other two of the same design mentioned or shown here:
  • First, the movement support columns on your clock are smooth whereas on the other two they have embossing on the middle of each side. This is observation only, not to question originality.
  • Second, I notice the movement support plate is completely different in shape compared to the other two or any of the other Koma's documented to date. This shape requires the support posts to be "square" to the front, where the other two are at a 45 degree angle to front, matching the alignment of the movement support plate "tabs" where they are mounted. All other Koma's with square posts are at the 45 degree setting. I'm wondering whether the support plate may be a replacement?
  • Third, the hands on your clock are "very" much a match for the design of the dial and overall aspect of the clock, which leads me to think the other two have replacement hands. I did notice on Matthias' clock the minute hand doesn't appear original, and on the auctioned clock the pierced diamond hands almost disappear on the dial whereas yours really stand out and provide an excellent match to clock appearance overall.
The 6762 clock:

I've not seen this dial design previously, it is very attractive. Aside from the dial being quite unusual, the pendulum balls on your clock are the first I have seen with a hexagonal diamond shape. Hopefully more will be documented in future so we can see what other clock models or designs where this variation was used.

From the clocks posted thus far, it is quite evident that Konrad Mauch wanted their clocks to be distinctive. This was certainly achieved with these examples.
 

Burkhard Rasch

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a project for the comming winter days,therefore the pictures "as recieved",allthough running out of the box.No serial numbers inside,mvmt.support plate without holes,plate Nr 1393A,hands fixed with a knurled nut.Nice quality clock,allthough nothing special and not expensive,something to make a present of when finished.
Burkhard
 

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MDean

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I purchased this miniature Konrad Mauch this morning at an Estate Sale.
Included with it were the key and instructions for a 400 day clock written in German and English.

Are these miniatures also 400 day.
I have read various posts but I am still unsure of the approximate date.
1950s ?

It has been working fine.

E.D.
 

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biokemyst

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All,

I'm new, so please forgive me if this is a set of questions that have been covered elsewhere, but I've been unable to find them if present.
I have been unable to find any definitive information on the clock I have imaged below. As you can see, it's a Koma. I believe it is a miniature. The ratchet is external. The backplate is 42.5x85 mm. There is a 4mm gap between the back of the main spring and the backplate (indicating a late model, perhaps?). The mainspring is ~18mm deep. According to what I've found online, the closest models are 42x77 in size(I think the closest I've been able to find is a 13-15 model). But, the pattern of holes on the backplate don't match up exactly with what I've seen from online portions of the identification book by Passmore. Finally, I measured the winding post and found it to be 4.25mm. That's larger than the 3.5mm sizes I'm seeing for the models in the text.

As far as the age, I am unsure though it was serviced in the late 80's. I think it might have been a present for my wife's grandparents as their 50th wedding anniversary would have been around then.
In any case, I would like to get it running again. It has no spindle cup or guard around the suspension spring. It obviously needs a new spring and bottom block. My calipers aren't good enough to determine the thickness of the spring needed. It wavers from .003 to .0035 inches. Also, I have no key for this clock.

Any information on what spring and key I can buy for this clock would be appreciated.

Before I found this forum, I ordered the following from an online source: (silly me...)
Bottom Block
Suspension spring pack 0030
Key size 8 (4.25mm)
IMG_1600.jpg IMG_1602.jpg IMG_1603.jpg IMG_1604.jpg IMG_1605.jpg IMG_1606.jpg Regards,

Kenny
 

MartinM

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Kenny,


It's not a miniature. It's a standard size. Just a narrow plate.

That was a cost saving measure implemented to pay import duties at a lesser "watch" movement rate than would have been due if it were larger and called a "clock".

The mainspring should be 20mm x 38mm
The suspension spring should be 0.0035" or .089mm (Horolovar, of course)

I'm not sure about the key size; but, 8 sounds about right. Another of their narrow movement clocks takes a 9.
 

biokemyst

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MartinM,

Thanks so much for the information! Not too bad.

I'm only out the $10 for the Horolovar suspension spring pack. Will order the proper thickness immediately.
So, any idea on what the model number is?

Kenny
 

MartinM

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'Fraid I can't help much on the model number.
The six relevant examples in the 10th Edition of the Horolovar Repair Guide are plates 1005, 1040h, 1340, 1395, 1395a and 1683.
I just refurb'd one like yours a couple of weeks ago that had "HXM" stamped where your KoMa logo is" Plate Number 1395a in the Horolovar Repair Guide says "XHM" which could be a typo. Your clock might be identified as 1395b in a later printing.
KoMa plates do have a lot of what appear to be model numbers and the guide doesn't always represent them, correctly. Plate 1393d has "WS" when a real-world clock shows that it's "5M", upside-down".
People on this forum are always amazing me with their collected knowledge and literature specimens, so you may still get what you're requesting.
 
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AusDan

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What do I have here?

Hi folks. This forum helped me learn more about my first 400d purchase, a 1950’sKoma, but my second is an unknown other than I’m sure is from the 30’s. It has a distinctive pendulum so I was able to find one other example on the web that sold on ebay in March http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Uns...054?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item51a8c8024e (perhaps purchased by one of you?) The crown on that clock also matched the pendulum but the columns on that one look like the post WWII decorated ones.
The centre of the base is silver and initially I thought it had been modified butnow I think it is original to match the dial. The “Made In Germany” on the dial appears to have been hand written. The other odd thing is the two holes in the front plate under the dial, are they viewing holes? There is a sticker under the base indicating this clock was sold from a Jeweller here in Australia. The suspension guard is missing but I have the original dome which is a bit taller and narrower than later ones. Any thoughts on this much appreciated.
 

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Shayne

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Re: What do I have here?

Hi AusDan the back plate looks like 1647 Koma however the clock could be a marriage . Regarding the centre portion of the base it could be steel that is plated try the magnet test. The 2 holes in the front plate are a bit strange and not viewing holes . I really can't tell if the dial is silvered or painted and the Made in Germany is surely not correct . The hands and the columns look like replacements I find the columns a bit too long as there is a bit too much space between the mounting plate and the base again that could have been done since the dime might not bee originally meant for a clock .

I noticed 2 bushings as well.

Nice low serial could you post a pic of the sticker ?

Let's see what the others have to say .

Regards
Shayne
 
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leeinv66

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Re: What do I have here?

Yes, this one is a marriage as far as I can tell. the base is an early Schlenker & Posner. And yes, the centre of the base is steel that was originally brass plated. I also believe the the finials are early Schlenker & Posner, so the crown may be original to the base. I am not sure about the columns as the ones from a Schlenker & Posner only have a cap on the bottom and not one on top. But, the top caps could be an addition as the retaining knobs are Schlenker & Posner. I think Shayne has picked the movement correctly as a Koma plate number 1647. As it happens, I am currently working on an early Schlenker & Posner that you can see in this thread at post number 161 for reference.

https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?54988-Post-Your-Schlenker-Posner-400-Day-Clocks-Here/page11
 

AusDan

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Re: What do I have here?

Hi Shayne, thanks for the info. The dial is silvered. I suspected this clock was put together from parts by the jeweller who sold it before the war. I imagine not many of these clocks were imported into Australia at the time. My next job is to find out all I can about the jeweller who's name may be German.
post4.png
 

AusDan

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Re: What do I have here?

Thanks leeinv66, I wouldn't have found out all that on my own, at least not for a while. I wasn't expecting the movement to be a Koma as I thought that maker only made these clocks for a short time after the war, according to another post I read somewhere here. I'll need to read up more about them.
 

leeinv66

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Re: What do I have here?

If you are searching for more Koma information, also search for Konrad Mauch.
 

John Hubby

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Re: What do I have here?

Yes, this one is a marriage as far as I can tell. the base is an early Schlenker & Posner. And yes, the centre of the base is steel that was originally brass plated. I also believe the the finials are early Schlenker & Posner, so the crown may be original to the base. I am not sure about the columns as the ones from a Schlenker & Posner only have a cap on the bottom and not one on top. But, the top caps could be an addition as the retaining knobs are Schlenker & Posner. I think Shayne has picked the movement correctly as a Koma plate number 1647. As it happens, I am currently working on an early Schlenker & Posner that you can see in this thread at post number 161 for reference.

https://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?54988-Post-Your-Schlenker-Posner-400-Day-Clocks-Here/page11
Peter and all, I have a surprise if you have not already seen some other threads where Koma movements have been found in SuP cases. Search for "Koma, Schlenker".

Here's the scenario:

1938: Schlenker & Posner (SuP) sold all their business to Kern & Söhne in 1938, including machinery, finished and unfinished clocks, parts, movements, cases, etc.

1939: By the cessation of production due to WWII, Kern had assembled about 2,000 SuP clocks all with SuP serial numbers, some with Kern & Söhne logo. These were even featured in an undated Kern catalog that must have been printed in 1938-39. We don't know if all these were sold before Kern shut down due to WWII; strong evidence indicates there were still some clocks in inventory as well as a relatively large stock of cases, bases, dials, bezels, and other parts.

1947: Kern & Söhne resumed production. As best can be determined they made and sold only their own movement designs which were the same basic design developed by Kienzle in the early 1900's and then used by Kern & Link (1929-1937) then Kern & Söhne (1937 to recently).

1947-48: Konrad Mauch (Koma) decided to start making 400-Day clocks. They scrounged up materials, machinery, parts, etc wherever they could to put together a working factory. They also designed and made their own unique movement design, illustrated as Plate 1647 in the Repair Guide. Initial production was stamped with a serial number, the highest to date is serial number 10063 probably made around 1950. They also designed and made their own unique pendulums such as the one with the clock in this thread and a "Embossed Diamond Ball" 4-Ball pendulum.

1947-50: From all evidence available, Koma purchased or bartered for the entire remaining stock of SuP parts owned by Kern. This resulted in Koma making their clocks using SuP cases, bases, crowns, finials, and other parts, with only the movements and pendulums by Koma. And, that is exactly what we find with the clock under discussion.

Here are the clocks that triggered my investigation into Koma/SuP:

4100 KomaSq1.jpg 4100 KomaSqBk.jpg 4100 KomaSqSd.jpg 4100 SuPSq.jpg The first three photos are of Koma serial number 4100, Plate 1647 made in 1949. You can see it has a distinctly Koma movement and pendulum, but the resemblance stops there. The fourth photo is of a SuP clock, serial number 21669 made in 1932. The two clocks have the identical case, including even the dial and hands. You can see the SuP 4-Ball pendulum No. 37 with the SuP clock. As an aside, the SuP clock was originally identified as a Kundo, not yet having found that SuP really existed as an independent maker.

There have been six SuP clocks with this square case and dome documented to date, made between 1932 and 1937. There have been three Koma clocks documented with this identical case.

So, long story short AusDan's clock is a full-fledged post-WWII Koma with details as follows:

> Made about 1948 based on the serial number.
> SuP parts used include the base, dial, bezel, support post finials,and bezel.
> Koma manufactured or supplied the movement, pendulum, crown and finials, movement support posts, and movement support plate.
> The hands I believe are not original, at this point Koma were using SuP hands, note the above two clocks for an example.

It should be noted that the movement support posts on early Koma production could be either SuP or by Koma/Jobber. The embossed support posts did not appear on any clock so far found made prior to WWII, so those would have been post-war and made either by Koma or a third party jobber.
 

John Hubby

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Re: What do I have here?

Hi Shayne, thanks for the info. The dial is silvered. I suspected this clock was put together from parts by the jeweller who sold it before the war. I imagine not many of these clocks were imported into Australia at the time. My next job is to find out all I can about the jeweller who's name may be German.
Dan, as you will see from the post I just made, in fact you have an authentic and complete post-WWII Koma clock. The only part that may not be original are the hands, and based on the serial number it would have been made in 1948.

It will be interesting to hear what you find about the jeweler and whether he is still in business.

With all this evidence, it's time to merge this thread with the "Post Your Koma 400-Day Clocks Here" thread, so we can keep all this good info together.
 
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leeinv66

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Re: What do I have here?

Thanks for pulling all this very interesting information together John and correcting my misinformation on Dan's clock. All in all, it is a very interesting story and highlights how much information on by gone makers has been lost with time. It is also very nice to know I now have another avenue for finding SuP parts.:) I have a question about the pendulum. I know I have seen it before, but I couldn't find it in the repair guide. Have I missed it in the guide or was it not known of when the guide was compiled?
 

AusDan

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Re: What do I have here?

Thanks John for the great info! It all makes sense now as to why it looks pre-war. Is the silver center on the base still normal? And do you know why there are holes in the front plate? I see another clock in this thread with the same holes.

Daniel.
 

John Hubby

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Re: What do I have here?

I have a question about the pendulum. I know I have seen it before, but I couldn't find it in the repair guide. Have I missed it in the guide or was it not known of when the guide was compiled?
Peter, the pendulum with Dan's clock isn't in the Repair Guide, neither is the one that is with the square dome clock. Also, the pendulum with Dan's clock is found together with a "curly" matching crown. See posts #6 and #7 by Victor Tang in this thread, where two different clocks have both the pendulum and the special crown.

I have seen the other pendulum with a few other Koma clocks, primarily Louvre style (bandstand) clocks, however it isn't common.
 

John Hubby

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Re: What do I have here?

Thanks John for the great info! It all makes sense now as to why it looks pre-war. Is the silver center on the base still normal? And do you know why there are holes in the front plate? I see another clock in this thread with the same holes.

Daniel.
Daniel, I think the center of the base was originally brass plated but that has been polished off. However, there "is" some possibility of it being chrome plated. Koma made a number of chrome plated clocks with what I call "mix and match" variants being completely chromed, or with the movement still brass, or with brass and chrome accents. If the center is chromed, it would have also been copper plated over the steel, then nickel plated and finally chromed. You possibly can tell by removing that part of the base and looking at the underside to see if there is evidence of copper.

Regarding the holes in the front plate I've not yet been able to figure out what they are for. It could be for a special dial, Koma had several as you can see from the clocks posted in this thread. However i've not seen any with posts in those locations so it's still a mystery.
 

leeinv66

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Re: What do I have here?

Peter, the pendulum with Dan's clock isn't in the Repair Guide, neither is the one that is with the square dome clock. Also, the pendulum with Dan's clock is found together with a "curly" matching crown. See posts #6 and #7 by Victor Tang in this thread, where two different clocks have both the pendulum and the special crown.

I have seen the other pendulum with a few other Koma clocks, primarily Louvre style (bandstand) clocks, however it isn't common.
Thanks John!
 

MUN CHOR-WENG

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Re: What do I have here?

This standard size KOMA shown below has a 4-figurine pendulum that is not listed in the Repair Guide as its construction is different from that of pendulum 92. The back plate of the clock is 66mm wide and is unmarked. It is very similar to Plate 1647 however there is one subtle difference as the latter is wider by 6mm.


A check with the Repair Guide shows that the standard size KOMA made in 1950 have the wider 72mm plate ( ref. Plate 1393, 1394, 1409, 1462 and 1647) and those standard size KOMA made from 1951 have the narrower 66mm plate ( ref. Plate 1393A, 1394A ).

Most probably the clock shown here was made in 1951 just after KOMA discontinued the use of serial number as well as the 72mm plate.

Mun C W
Copy of DSCN3621.jpg Copy of DSCN3622.jpg DSCN3625.jpg
 

John Hubby

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Re: What do I have here?

Mun, congratulations on your keen observation of the change in plate size for standard full-size Koma clocks! I had missed that and I'll bet most others as well. Knowing about this change will most certainly help in identification and dating of the early Koma's.

What is also interesting is that the narrower full-size plate was immediately followed by the 1.77" wide plates also from 1951 onward, for example Plate 1395. It would be interesting to know if Koma (and others) made the narrow plate clocks only for direct export to the U.S. and continued the wider plate clocks for sales in Europe and elsewhere, even through the U.S. military PX stores. I know we do find many wide plate clocks of all makes that can be dated well past the 1951 tariff change date that caused the narrow plate introduction to the U.S. market.

The reason I ask this is we know Kaiser introduced a narrow plate "Universe" model right from the beginning of their production of those clocks in 1954, but also made a majority of their production using the wide plate versions until they ceased production in 1962. Since they were embargoed from selling to the U.S. using the Universe name not too long after the introduction of the Universe, we know now they just shifted gears and pushed sales in Europe and into Asia using the wide plate models. For example, I purchased many Universe clocks in Southeast Asia from 1985 to the mid-1990's, and ALL of those were wide plate models. I have found all the narrow plate models I have bought or serviced, etc, in the U.S. Perhaps you might provide some insight from your experience in Singapore.
 

AusDan

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Re: What do I have here?

I also noticed this while trying to work out if my 50's Koma (also bought in Australia) is early or late 50's. It has the slightly narrower wide plate but no name on the dial, which I thought indicated earlier before putting the name on the dial became common practice. But now that every example of 50's Koma I've seen has a signed dial, I suspect mine has been replaced. The metal inside one side of the bezel is also bent and I doubt it left the factory that way.
 

AusDan

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Re: What do I have here?

Also, the Mervyn Passmore pages for the Standard Early and Standard Late say that both have square tube guards with flaps and the Koma logo, but mine and others such as that in post 13 and 16 have round guards and not all have the logo. Another change?
 
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John Hubby

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Re: What do I have here?

Also, the Mervyn Passmore pages for the Standard Early and Standard Late say that both have square tube guards with flaps and the Koma logo, but mine and others such as that in post 13 and 16 have round guards and not all have the logo. Another change?
Daniel, Mervyn's info isn't complete. The square guards were on all the clocks made to about 1952 but the round guard appeared about that time and became was commonly used after that. If you have a copy of the Horolovar Repair Guide, look at Appendices 84, 85, and 86; these show a round guard with all three models (standard, miniature, midget). Also as I recall the narrow plate standard models may all have round guards.

There were a lot of Koma's made with no logo or stamp on the back plate, see plates 1647, 1682 and 1683.
 
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MUN CHOR-WENG

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Re: What do I have here?

Mun,
The reason I ask this is we know Kaiser introduced a narrow plate "Universe" model right from the beginning of their production of those clocks in 1954, but also made a majority of their production using the wide plate versions until they ceased production in 1962. Since they were embargoed from selling to the U.S. using the Universe name not too long after the introduction of the Universe, we know now they just shifted gears and pushed sales in Europe and into Asia using the wide plate models. For example, I purchased many Universe clocks in Southeast Asia from 1985 to the mid-1990's, and ALL of those were wide plate models. I have found all the narrow plate models I have bought or serviced, etc, in the U.S. Perhaps you might provide some insight from your experience in Singapore.



John,

Kaiser 400 day clocks were quite rare here when compared with Schatz, Kundo and Koma.The few Kaiser that I had acquired here during the early 1980s had narrow plate. They were mainly Standard World model that were sold to me by the local importer who was clearing his unsold stock. I did buy a Universe model with narrow plate from a dealer but I have never acquired any wide plate Kaiser here in Singapore.


Mun C W
 

John Hubby

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Re: What do I have here?

John,

Kaiser 400 day clocks were quite rare here when compared with Schatz, Kundo and Koma.The few Kaiser that I had acquired here during the early 1980s had narrow plate. They were mainly Standard World model that were sold to me by the local importer who was clearing his unsold stock. I did buy a Universe model with narrow plate from a dealer but I have never acquired any wide plate Kaiser here in Singapore.

Mun C W
Mun, thanks for your observations. Like you, I rarely saw any Universe models in Singapore. However, they could regularly be found in the Jalan Surabaya flea market in Jakarta and also in "antique" shops in Balikpapan. I also came across them occasionally in Bangkok and Hong Kong, and as it happened all those were wide plate models. Now that you mention the standard World model, I recall a friend of mine bringing those out of Viet Nam after it reopened for business in the late 1980's and they had narrow plate movements.
 

AusDan

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Apr 22, 2013
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Re: What do I have here?

Just thought I'd post an update on this Koma No. 389. After some cleaning and a new suspension spring it is so far running very well. Thanks again for all the great information that goes with it.
IMG_0163.jpg
 
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KurtinSA

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I've pulled this Konrad Mauch out for overhaul. I wondered about dating and saw what John had posted before. There is the number 1064 on the insides of the two plates. Since the support bracket holds the anchor's bushing, I'll probably leave things alone until I can clean everything. Right now, the escape wheel doesn't turn with power on the clock, so I can't tell very much about the escapement.

Kurt

KonMauchFrt.jpg KonMauchBck.jpg
 

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