Post your JUNGHANS clocks here

Haley

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Hello everyone!
First time poster and first time Junghans owner here! We’ve just adopted a Junghans mantel clock from my husband’s grand parents and I’m looking to get to know it a little better. I’ve gone through many of the posts on this thread and I think I’m getting the hang of some of the main identifiers. Markings on the movement are an 8-pointed star, A.-6., W200/100, so am I correct in thinking the movement is a 1906? To further frustrate me there are some markings on the bottom of the case, either 17/1940 or 17/1948, it’s too difficult to read. What are your thoughts?

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Steven Thornberry

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Markings on the movement are an 8-pointed star, A.-6
What you are reading as A-6 is actually A-G, for Aktiengesellschaft (more or less "Corporation"). This movement is probably some later than 1906, perhaps the 1930's or later.
 
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Haley

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What you are reading as A-6 is actually A-G, for Aktiengesellschaft (more or less "Corporation"). This movement is probably some later than 1906, perhaps the 1930's or later.
You’re absolutely right, that is a “G”, whoops thanks for the correction.
 

tracerjack

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The movement has dimpling which according to the consensus in the archives, the practice began sometime in the 1930's. So, the case numbers, if it were a smeared 11 and not 17 could very well be a date. I'm thinking 40 more than 48, but I'm just commenting from what little I know. There are experts who will be along soon.
 

new2clocks

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The movement has dimpling which according to the consensus in the archives, the practice began sometime in the 1930's. So, the case numbers, if it were a smeared 11 and not 17 could very well be a date. I'm thinking 40 more than 48, but I'm just commenting from what little I know. There are experts who will be along soon.
The W200/100 movement was in use from circa 1927 to circa 1967. And, you are correct - the consensus is dimpled movements commenced in the 1930's.

As best we know, Junghans date coded their movements from 1901 to the early 1950s. Based on the dimpled movement and the lack of a date code, my guess is the OPs clock is more likely from the early 1950s.

Regards.
 

YorkshireBoy

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Hi, New to this forum and not a clock man, Inherited the Junghans below from my grandfather, It was the one thing i wanted from his house when he passed as i remember it fondly growing up. I knew nothing of its origins or maker until it came into my possession - Any information on it appreciated

Junghans 1.jpg
 

JTD

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Hi, New to this forum and not a clock man, Inherited the Junghans below from my grandfather, It was the one thing i wanted from his house when he passed as i remember it fondly growing up. I knew nothing of its origins or maker until it came into my possession - Any information on it appreciated

View attachment 606952
Welcome to the board.

Please show us photos of the movement, particularly the back plate, and it will be possible to give you more information. You say it is a Junghans and it may well be, but I can't see any identifying marks in your photo (which is not very sharp) and so I am wondering how you know it is a Junghans.

JTD
 

YorkshireBoy

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Welcome to the board.

Please show us photos of the movement, particularly the back plate, and it will be possible to give you more information. You say it is a Junghans and it may well be, but I can't see any identifying marks in your photo (which is not very sharp) and so I am wondering how you know it is a Junghans.

JTD
Thanks JTD , I'm away from home but my wife took the following pictures (not exactly what i wanted !) - on the inside back of the case is the "J" logo and unghans. I hope you can just see the design behind the bowl chime and Wire chime in the attached. Will get better pictures once i am back home in a couple of weeks

junghans 6.jpg junghans 5.jpg junghans 4.jpg
 

JTD

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Hmm, well, yes, I think I can just make out the J behind the bell and the gong if I try hard and really believe! Joking apart, Yes, it seems to be a Junghans.

If you can photo the back plate of the movement, there may well be a date code which will enable us to date your clock.

It looks as if there is rust on parts of the movement - did it get wet sometime?

JTD
 

Mr Smith

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Hello everyone!
One of my relatives inherited this Junghans clock. He would like to know more about it therefore, he took some photos of it. According to the photos, there is only the trademark on its dial and black plate (nothing else). We would appreciate any information regarding its age, originality, catalogue photo, etc. Can it be the original case or was the older mouvement installed in it later?
Thanks for your help in advance!

Falióra.jpg Falióra 6.jpg Falióra2.jpg Falióra 4.jpg Falióra 5.jpg
 

new2clocks

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Hello everyone!
One of my relatives inherited this Junghans clock. He would like to know more about it therefore, he took some photos of it. According to the photos, there is only the trademark on its dial and black plate (nothing else). We would appreciate any information regarding its age, originality, catalogue photo, etc. Can it be the original case or was the older mouvement installed in it later?
Thanks for your help in advance!

View attachment 608128 View attachment 608129 View attachment 608130 View attachment 608131 View attachment 608132
The Junghans trademark was registered in circa 1891 and as best we know, Junghans commenced date coding their movements in 1901. This implies that your movement was made between 1891 and 1901.

The style of your case is a box clock, which would put your clock towards 1901.

The year 1901 would be a bit early for box clocks. They became popular around 1910 or so, but we can not rule out the originality of the case. Frankly, I have no strong opinion as to the originality of the case. It could be an early box clock.

Regards.
 
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Steven Thornberry

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Anyone know somthing about this clock? Ty

View attachment 613992 View attachment 613993
A nice example of a German ogee clock, imitating a style of clock that is associated with American makers. We not too long ago had a thread on another German-made ogee. There are references there that would prove interesting reading. Unfortunately, articles in past issues of the NAWCC Bulletin can be accessed only by members of the NAWCC. Still, you might find the thread itself interesting.

Unusual, Thick Veneered, Reverse Ogee Clock
 
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Steven Thornberry

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IIRC, that Junghans paper label - the "e pluribus unum" and variations of it - were noted as early as 1877 through 1882 and possibly later.

It is a very early Junghans trademark / logo.

Regards.
E.J. Tyler, in his book American Clocks for the Collector, states that the trademark was registered in 1877. He implies it might have been in use until 1888 when Junghans registered their five-point star logo. Junghans was one of the earliest German companies to copy American style clocks, movements, cases, even labels. The idea was to capitalize on the popularity and inexpensiveness of American clocks in an attempt to reclaim some of the European market (particularly England) taken over by the American clock manufacturers.
 

Cocomut

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Hello,
I just purchased this A06 Jughans clock at an estate sale for 45.00.

I think it is supposed to be a Westminster chime, but it seems to be missing some notes. I actually kind of like this though, as I get a little bored of Westminster at times. I suppose if I took it to be serviced they would set it back to the correct striking pattern.

I have had the clock running for about 12 hours now, and it keeps quite accurate time (so far). We'll see how it goes over the next few days.

I have a couple of questions.
1. Did these clocks come with a night time silencer? Or is that a feature that came only on later clocks?
2. Is this the original case? I see another person posted this same clock, so I am thinking it might be original.
3. What is the purpose of the lever on the front left of the clock face?

Thank you!

20200927_085031.jpg 20200927_085019.jpg 20200927_085041.jpg 20200927_085211.jpg 20200927_085223.jpg 20200927_085348.jpg
 

JTD

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What is the purpose of the lever on the front left of the clock face?
Welcome to the board.

I think the lever on the left is the night-time chime silencer. Try it and see.

Others will no doubt be along to give you more information.

JTD
 
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Cocomut

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Welcome to the board.

I think the lever on the left is the night-time chime silencer. Try it and see.

Others will no doubt be along to give you more information.

JTD
Thanks for the welcome!

That is was I was hoping. I am kind of afraid to poke and prod too much, as I don't want to break anything.

When I first got the clock home, that lever on the left (located at the 9 position) was loose, kind of floppy.
After I wound the clock up, it became stiff. So now I am wondering if it is an indicator for how much wind the springs have?
 

Cocomut

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No, sorry, it's not! But that's an ingenious idea!

JTD
Oh thanks, well, now I am hoping it is a silencer. I don't mind the clock chiming 24 hours, but I think my husband won't appreciate it. :)

Maybe I should have been a clock designer, haha.
 

Cocomut

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When I first got the clock home, that lever on the left (located at the 9 position) was loose, kind of floppy.
After I wound the clock up, it became stiff.
Well, I need to amend this statement.
I just checked it again and it is still loose. Maybe it was my imagination that it stiffened up.

If I try to push the lever up, it just sort of softly falls back to the bottom of the slot, like it isn't attached to anything.
 

JTD

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If I try to push the lever up, it just sort of softly falls back to the bottom of the slot, like it isn't attached to anything.
It may have become detached. You would need to take the movement out to see what's happening.

JTD
 
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one1laner

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Here is my Junghans Clock. I don’t know if it’s called a shelf clock or mantel clock or bracket. Maybe you could help me with that. The wood is mahogany with original finish. I really like its form and it runs perfectly with a deep, mellow Westminster chime striking the hour on one rod. Thank you, keep up the good work!

John
 

Rockin Ronnie

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Hi, i bought this Junghans Mantle clock B11 / 151 from an auction a while back, 2008, and finally got around to take some pictures whilst cleaning the outside.
Since only having it such a short "time" can you please provide some history background on where this clock started out. Any information appreciated, thanks.

On the bottom there is an 18
On the door-inside there is 5699 and 60/-
Movement B11 with 151.

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Just picked up one of these recently. Did you ever find out the model name or number?

Ron
 

Anthony Rowan

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This is my first post. I have an H. Endler vienna wall clock, some pocket watches and this Junghans mantel clock that I recently bought on an auction site. It came as not working and it didn't take long to realise that the mainspring was broken. The chime side of the mechanism was working OK. Anyway I broke down the whole clock and cleaned and lubricated it. Here is the clock now working again. It is classic art deco and to me looks very stylish. It has a ting tang chime and sounds really nice. The W278 movement is dated September 1934. There is a small piece missing from the bottom edge of the clock. I would guess it is a strip of brass. Does anyone know if that if it is brass or something else?


Tony.

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LucaMat

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Dear Members and Forumers,
this is my first post.

I like very much this thread and I would like to give my small contribution.

I've got my first Junghans clock some months ago.

61.jpg a.jpg

It is a very ordinary '20s clock (I saw many other not branded ones, here in Italy, with an identical mechanism).

On the rear plate I can read the datecode: A29.V

Whereas 104 1/2 is the beatrate (104,75 BPM).

01f.jpg 02f.jpg

What's your idea?
Does it mean that it was produced in 1929?
And what does the letter V mean?

This code is slightly puzzling me.
Based on the table posted in this thread, the clocks produced in 1929 were marked with the code year/month of production (i.e. 29 7 or 29 8), but in your table, for the 1929 year, I read codes from june to december only.
Could be an hypothesis that the year/month code is only worth the second half of the year? Or maybe was the code different for US market clocks?

In any case, I guess that my clock was produced in Italy.
I know that, since 1903, Junghans had a huge production plant in Venice ( perhaps that is the reason for letter V after the code).
The Junghans plant in Venice, which is more or less in the middle of the island of Giudecca, white, curved, with huge windows, was once the largest watch factory in the world, with a peak output of 1,500 units a day.

I hope that these info are interesting for you, and that my humble clock is adding a few small data to the collection of this thread.

Luca
 

new2clocks

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Welcome to the forum.

Thank you very much for sharing your clock! Other than mystery swingers, I do not recall seeing any Italian made Junghans movements.

I know that, since 1903, Junghans had a huge production plant in Venice ( perhaps that is the reason for letter V after the code).
Junghans had what was first an assembly plant, going back to 1878, then by the turn of the century, a manufacturing facility in Venice which, after various name changes, became the Fabbrica d'Orologeria Arturo Junghans Venezia (Giudecca). Curtesy Doug Stevenson.



Based on the table posted in this thread, the clocks produced in 1929 were marked with the code year/month of production (i.e. 29 7 or 29 8), but in your table, for the 1929 year, I read codes from june to december only.
These date codes have been documented. Date codes for the year 1929 most likely used the "two digit year [space] one or two digit month" protocol for the months of January 1929 through May 1929, inclusive.

As mentioned before, I have not seen a Junghans movement made in Italy (other than swingers), so perhaps the Italian made non-swinger movements used the "A or B two digit year date codes" for the 1929 production year.

And what does the letter V mean?
I am not sure. This is the first that I have seen this.

Regards.
 
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new2clocks

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Junghans had what was first an assembly plant, going back to 1878, then by the turn of the century, a manufacturing facility in Venice which, after various name changes, became the Fabbrica d'Orologeria Arturo Junghans Venezia (Giudecca). Curtesy Doug Stevenson.
Here is an advertisement from Junghans Italy. Curtesy Doug Stevenson

1606928708409.png

Regards.
 

torpedo353

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Hi.
A new poster here. I bought this W63 movement mantel clock a few months ago from Germany. Any clues about the year it was made?

tempImagePIc7iP.jpg tempImageRz2hay.jpg tempImagex0hw2I.jpg tempImagebqB1km.jpg tempImage4mkEr3.png tempImageWKiLNm.jpg tempImagezuZ84d.jpg
 

JTD

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Assuming they were reversing date numbers at this point, I would say 1936.

I think W63 is the model number of the movement, not a date code. I don't see any date code on the photos, but it is not easy when they are all sideways and partial views!

Just guessing, I would say this is just pre- or just post-war in date but more complete photos might help.

JTD
 

JTD

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Thanks Rockin Ronnie but I agree with JTD, I think W63 is the movement.

Sorry for the photo orientation, I have just managed to take better ones.

View attachment 627005 View attachment 627006 View attachment 627007 View attachment 627008
Thanks for posting the better photos. I don't see any date identification at all.

The design looks like late 1930s but I think this style may have continued a while, so I will hedge my bets and stick with my original thought that it is either just pre- or just post-war.
 

torpedo353

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Thanks for posting the better photos. I don't see any date identification at all.

The design looks like late 1930s but I think this style may have continued a while, so I will hedge my bets and stick with my original thought that it is either just pre- or just post-war.
Thank you JTD.
It is surprising how well it works after so many years!
 

new2clocks

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Assuming they were reversing date numbers at this point, I would say 1936.
As JTD noted, the W in W63 stands for werke and is the manner that Junghans labeled their movement numbers. The documented dating protocol for the production year 1936 would be "two digit year [space] two digit month" or, for example, "36 10".

Any clues about the year it was made?
Welcome to the forum.

The W63 movement is actually a movement of Hamburg American Clock ("HAC / HAU"), a German company that was taken over by Junghans in 1930. There was a collaboration between Junghans and HAC in the late 1920s prior to the acquisition. So this would put your movement at no earlier than 1928 or so.

It appears that the trademark on the movement ends in "berg", which is most likely the end of the word "Württemberg". This could help narrowing date coding of the clock.

Also, there appears to be something inscribed on the movement near the trademark. This could be the date code for which we are seeking. Unfortunately, it is located behind the strike hammers. Please look and let us know what you see or provide a picture without the hammer as a block.

Regards.
 
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torpedo353

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As JTD noted, the W in W63 stands for werke and is the manner that Junghans labeled their movement numbers. The documented dating protocol for the production year 1936 would be "two digit year [space] two digit month" or, for example, "36 10".



Welcome to the forum.

The W63 movement is actually a movement of Hamburg American Clock ("HAC / HAU"), a German company that was taken over by Junghans in 1930. There was a collaboration between Junghans and HAC in the late 1920s prior to the acquisition. So this would put your movement at no earlier than 1928 or so.

It appears that the trademark on the movement ends in "berg", which is most likely the end of the word "Württemberg". This could help narrowing date coding of the clock.

Also, there appears to be something inscribed on the movement near the trademark. This could be the date code for which we are seeking. Unfortunately, it is located behind the strike hammers. Please look and let us know what you see or provide a picture without the hammer as a block.

Regards.
Hi New2clocks.
Thank you for your extensive answer. I am including a clearer photo but I am afraid there is no date code. Does this mean that it is post 50's?

IMG_1204.jpeg
 

new2clocks

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Does this mean that it is post 50's?
Not necessarily.

Here is a picture of a W63 movement that was previously posted on the forum. This W63 has the HAC trademark of the crossed arrows. In the upper left corner of the backplate, there is a barely legible inscription (upside down) that reads "7,30". The inscription was identified as representing a manufacture date of July, 1930. This has been identified as a Junghans date code that was applied to an HAC movement, which makes sense since it would be at the time or after the time Junghans purchased HAC.

1607890761725.png

The pictures you provided do not allow us to inspect that area (or other areas) of the movement for that type of barely discernable date code. Is it possible to provide more detailed pictures or let us know what you found?

Regards.
 

new2clocks

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Do the hands in the logo being at 1:28 have any significance or is that their regular logo?
Don
According to mikrolisk, Junghans had three trademarks as shown on the label of the OP's clock, sans the "Original Junghans", and all were from circa 1917 / 1918. The clocks on all three of the trademarks were showing the time of 1:28.

I recall seeing this particular trademark only on labels - not on the movement or dial.

OTOH, I have not seen every Junghans clock. :)

Regards.
 
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Anthony Rowan

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Hi Torpedo353,

I am new to clocks as well. Regarding your clock it is likely somewhere around 1930 as it appears in the Junghans catalogue from 1930 available at the Junghans archive. It is identified by the model number 17 425 which you can see on the base of the clock case. a link to the archive is given below. Just look for the model number 17 425 in the catalogue.

1930_01_full.pdf (junghansarchiv.de)

Regards,

Tony.
 
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torpedo353

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Not necessarily.

Here is a picture of a W63 movement that was previously posted on the forum. This W63 has the HAC trademark of the crossed arrows. In the upper left corner of the backplate, there is a barely legible inscription (upside down) that reads "7,30". The inscription was identified as representing a manufacture date of July, 1930. This has been identified as a Junghans date code that was applied to an HAC movement, which makes sense since it would be at the time or after the time Junghans purchased HAC.

View attachment 627051

The pictures you provided do not allow us to inspect that area (or other areas) of the movement for that type of barely discernable date code. Is it possible to provide more detailed pictures or let us know what you found?

Regards.
I haven´t found anything. When I bought it the bell sound wouldn´t work so I took apart the movement but I didn´t see any date code as the one you mentioned.
 

torpedo353

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Hi Torpedo353,

I am new to clocks as well. Regarding your clock it is likely somewhere around 1930 as it appears in the Junghans catalogue from 1930 available at the Junghans archive. It is identified by the model number 17 425 which you can see on the base of the clock case. a link to the archive is given below. Just look for the model number 17 425 in the catalogue.

1930_01_full.pdf (junghansarchiv.de)

Regards,

Tony.
Hi Anthony.

Thank you for the info. I didn´t know this sort of info was available at the Junghans archive. It is the exact model.

Regards,
 

Kevin C

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Hello,

Inherited this clock from grand mother. It lived it’s life at a farm in the Danish countryside outside Randers. I’d appreciate anything you can tell me about it and maybe the best way to removed the paint on the case.It doesn’t seem as elegant as most of the others posted here- face and pendulum seem hand painted instead of ceramic, there’s no mark on the movement and it has bits of wiring all over it, the chime looks basic. Elements of it look similar to other clocks like the face on the finial and the overall look of the case- I found the original wood stain under chime. The case is falling apart and lots of bits missing. Let me know what you think. Thanks in advance.

FE57D8C1-BEB4-4C1A-9D2B-7B750466B2FB.jpeg A202FA98-C381-4E8A-B972-362BAC92F4D8.jpeg 53C1AF8D-CB81-40EE-8661-70F11B564089.jpeg 24E82A42-AE6A-4F8E-8972-4B7D3A68472C.jpeg 7D83B2E2-8C08-47D9-9760-225107374533.jpeg F22784EE-B777-4FCE-831A-B8AA566ADF00.jpeg
 

new2clocks

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Hello,

Inherited this clock from grand mother. It lived it’s life at a farm in the Danish countryside outside Randers. I’d appreciate anything you can tell me about it and maybe the best way to removed the paint on the case.It doesn’t seem as elegant as most of the others posted here- face and pendulum seem hand painted instead of ceramic, there’s no mark on the movement and it has bits of wiring all over it, the chime looks basic. Elements of it look similar to other clocks like the face on the finial and the overall look of the case- I found the original wood stain under chime. The case is falling apart and lots of bits missing. Let me know what you think. Thanks in advance.

View attachment 629526 View attachment 629527 View attachment 629528 View attachment 629529 View attachment 629530 View attachment 629531
Welcome to the forum.

The trademark on the dial (Unghans over J) was registered in 1890.

The style of case suggests the clock was made in the 1890s or early 1900s.

Your questions regarding the case may be better answered in either the Clock Repair forum or the Clock Construction form.

Please do NOT start a new thread. If you click on the "Report" button, you can request a moderator to carve out your post and place it in either forum. Only a moderator can move a thread.

Regards.
 

LucaMat

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Dear Members and Forumers,
this is my first post.

I like very much this thread and I would like to give my small contribution.

I've got my first Junghans clock some months ago.

View attachment 625217 View attachment 625218

It is a very ordinary '20s clock (I saw many other not branded ones, here in Italy, with an identical mechanism).

On the rear plate I can read the datecode: A29.V

Whereas 104 1/2 is the beatrate (104,75 BPM).

View attachment 625219 View attachment 625220

What's your idea?
Does it mean that it was produced in 1929?
And what does the letter V mean?

This code is slightly puzzling me.
Based on the table posted in this thread, the clocks produced in 1929 were marked with the code year/month of production (i.e. 29 7 or 29 8), but in your table, for the 1929 year, I read codes from june to december only.
Could be an hypothesis that the year/month code is only worth the second half of the year? Or maybe was the code different for US market clocks?

In any case, I guess that my clock was produced in Italy.
I know that, since 1903, Junghans had a huge production plant in Venice ( perhaps that is the reason for letter V after the code).
The Junghans plant in Venice, which is more or less in the middle of the island of Giudecca, white, curved, with huge windows, was once the largest watch factory in the world, with a peak output of 1,500 units a day.

I hope that these info are interesting for you, and that my humble clock is adding a few small data to the collection of this thread.

Luca
Hi everybody,
I decided to add some info to my post, because today I found the model of this clock, on a 1932's catalogue.
the name of the model is Milano.
I discovered that, unfortunately, the dial of my clock is not the original one.
The dial shown on the catalogue is a 18x18 cm (around 7x7 inches) square one, with a more modern fonts for the digits.
Honestly, since the beginning, the shape of the dial was looking slightly strange for me!
Now I start looking for a new dial for my clock.

Here attached the page from the catalogue (the Milano model is the last one at the rignt side).
Da catalogo 1932-33 orologi simili.JPG
Here the detail.
Da catalogo 1932-33 Modello Milano.JPG

my best wishes to everybody for a better new year.
Luca
 

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