Post Your Gustav Becker Clocks Here

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Mike306p/Ansoniaman, Jul 5, 2006.

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  1. mr.jeepster

    mr.jeepster Registered User

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    #251 mr.jeepster, May 16, 2009
    Last edited: May 16, 2009
    Thanks John, I repaired the pendulum with a small square brass and shape it . Now to put the movement back together and clean another set of those damn spring barrels by hand (AGAIN). And my newest 1923 gustav becker clock to my collection and look 3 spring barrel's on this one too. God -now I know why I like weights clock's !!! Maybe I stop buying gustav becker clock's and buy myself a spring tool ?!:rolleyes:
     

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  2. testguy

    testguy Registered User
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    Here are my two Gustav Beckers.

    The Vienna Regulator is pristine and original, and I really like the second hand.

    The other clock case was severely damaged and I had to re-veneer the inside back of the case as well as replace small areas of veneer on the outside of the case, and stain and varnish the complete case.
    The clock is missing it's top and I have no idea if I could purchase a replacement.

    Brian
     

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  3. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    I can't answer to GB specifically WDriven, but in general, minute cannons are tensioned two ways.
    1. Interference fit to centershaft - probably what you have and,
    2. Requiring a tension spring beneath minute cannon and tension washer below taper pin.
     
  4. Steve S-S

    Steve S-S Registered User

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    Greetings from a Canadian newbie amateur. I am researching a Gustav Becker grandfather clock that my wife and I inherited from her parents who purchased it in Germany in the early 1960's. According to John Hubby's data, the logos and serial number ( [FONT=&quot]DRP No. 171659) indicate it was made in Freiburg in 1903. It stands 7'6" and has an oak open case (no door) with two massive spiral turnings at the front corners of the mid-section over a box weight-well. It has two equal weights and a coil gong. I will post photos when I get that figured out. In the meantime here are a couple questions for the group:

    1) What does "DRP" indicate; does it signify a grandfather clock? I am curious whether the grandfather case is original. It is much less ornate than the GB wall clocks I have seen posted. The case joinery is OK but hardly exceptional.

    2) There is a lever projecting from the right side of the works just behind the face. When depressed it forces the clock to strike. What is the purpose?


    Thanks for your help. Looking forward to learning more about this treasure.


    [/FONT]
     
  5. Jeremy Woodoff

    Jeremy Woodoff Registered User
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    Steve,

    I believe "DRP" means "patented."

    The lever's purpose appears to be just what you found. It causes the clock to strike the previous hour. This is known as a repeating function. It was more commonly used on small clocks that might be placed near a bed, so that the time could be checked in the dark.

    If you can post pictures of the case and movement, we might be able to provide more information.
     
  6. Weight Driven

    Weight Driven Registered User
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    thanks for the reply Scottie. I believe it is the Interference system without the tension spring. What I do know is this is the finest time keeper I have ever owned. I set the time two weeks ago and with minor adjustment, it has kept quartz time since. No fiddling around with the pendulum bob every few days, it just keeps great time.
     
  7. laprade

    laprade Banned

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    a lot of count wheel striking clocks had a lever and either a wire (US) or cord (Gr) to allow for adjusting the strike if it was out of sequence.

    such a lever, wire, or cord, if in a "rack strike" clock, is for "repeater" use.

    pulling the wire of a count wheel clock, advances the strike to the next count. So check the type, before you pull your wire.
     
  8. Steve S-S

    Steve S-S Registered User

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    https://mb.nawcc.org/picture.php?albumid=110&pictureid=599https://mb.nawcc.org/picture.php?albumid=110&pictureid=597

    Here are a couple photos from the album I just posted https://mb.nawcc.org/album.php?albumid=110

    Thanks to Jeremy's led, I found DRP stands for Deutsches Reichspatent. But now I am confused as to whether "[FONT=&quot]DRP No. 171659" indicates the patent number or GB serial number. I have been assuming the latter, which yields a 1903 date. Is that right?

    The lever does repeat the current hour chime, so we can tell time in the dark now, eh? More likely we will just use it to impress the grandkids.

    My next question has to do with beat adjustment. Can someone provide a step-by-step for adjusting the crutch pin and the adjustable fork jaws. It doesn't look like there is enough room to do it in place. I am also worried about introducing a hinge/pendulum twist in the process.

    PS - I found a 1763 map of Silesia that shows both Freiburg and
    [/FONT] Braunau. Neither show up on modern maps.
    http://www.hoeckmann.de/germany/silesia.htm
    [FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT]
     
  9. Delon4

    Delon4 New Member

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    [FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]PS - I found a 1763 map of Silesia that shows both Freiburg and [/FONT][/FONT]Braunau. Neither show up on modern maps.
    http://www.hoeckmann.de/germany/silesia.htm

    [/QUOTE]

    Freiburg in Schlesien is german name of Swiebodzice (Poland), similiary to Braunau - Broumov (Czech republik). As you can see neither is in Germany. Cities are close to each other, as shown in the old map.
     
  10. laprade

    laprade Banned

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    I've been mulling over the theories about the "repeater strike lever".

    In a bed-side clock, it makes sense, you reach out in the dark and knock it off the table! but if someone couldn't see the dial of the big longcase clock, I can't imagine them being able to find, open and pull the cord of a standing clock, in the dark!

    The lever is something to do with getting the hands right after putting the clock back together.
     
  11. Steve S-S

    Steve S-S Registered User

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    Delon4, thanks for the help with historical geography. Those two factories were close alright, only about 30 km as the crow flies.

    Laprade, I wish I knew enough about clocks to test your theory. All I can say is the lever is a prominent fixture, like it was intended for frequent use. The tip has a hole for attaching a cord and there is a hole directly below it in the wood shelf that the mechanism sits on (visible in the photo in my recent post). A cord running through this hole would hang down next to the drive chains and be easily accessible. Depressing the lever lifts one end of a gear shaft on the other side of the clock mechanism causing the current hour strike to repeat. I could post more photos if that would help. I would be great if this lever actually had a more useful purpose, like maybe helping to re-synchronize the strike count or something.

    We also inherited an old three-weight cuckoo that has two mystery cords hanging next to the drive chains. A research project for another day ....
     
  12. laprade

    laprade Banned

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    Steve,

    I agree, these cords etc, are very prominent.

    You'll have to make a "controlled scientific experiment": turn off all the house lights and then try and find the clock, and pull the cord, with out breaking your neck on the stairs, or triping over the cat!

    bon chance! bon courage!

    stephen
     
  13. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    MJ, very nice lancet style Westminster. This one actually was made early 1921 based on the serial number, and is the same as Model No. 436 in the 1924 GB catalog except yours does not have a molded wood trim on the front.
     
  14. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Steve, thanks for posting the photos of your clock. I think I can clear up the confusion regarding DRP/Serial Number.

    As you have already noted, "DRP" stands for Deutsche Reich Patent. The German patent office started operation in June 1877 and the patent on your clock was granted by them. DRP 171659 was granted on 15 April 1906, thus the clock could not have been made before that. It is for a noiseless strike rack system that will be found on the clock.

    The serial number for your clock is hidden behind the small bracket screwed to the back plate at the bottom edge, you will need to remove that bracket to see the number. Also, the serial number may be stamped on the front plate of the movement. When you find and provide that number, I can accurately date when your clock was made.

    There is a very similar clock to yours featured in the 1912 GB catalog, I will post a scan later for comparison. However, the most important information needed right now is the serial number.
     
  15. jrmartin

    jrmartin Registered User

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    Bought recently.

    Saludos.
     

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  16. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    #266 John Hubby, May 20, 2009
    Last edited: May 20, 2009
    JR, does the movement have a serial number? Probably on the front plate if not hidden near the bottom of the back plate. I also see the number "8" at upper center of the back plate, is that part of a pendulum length number?

    This movement, if I'm not mistaken, is Becker's version of a two train Westminster strike clock. I've seen only a couple others, will appreciate if you could also post a photo of the inside of the case.

    For info and comparison, I'm attaching a scan of a very similar model to yours from the GB 1912 catalog (published by Victor Tang). The main difference is the pediment slightly different design and a different door glass. Note the dial and hands are identical as are the side columns on the door.
     

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  17. wensing

    wensing New Member

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    #267 wensing, May 21, 2009
    Last edited: May 21, 2009
    GB clock - dating, ID?

    Hi, I recently was given an old clock. I am delighted that it is running and striking OK. I want to repair this clock into its former glory! :)

    Research pointed me to this forum, and I was hoping that someone can ID this clock and give some more information than I already gathered.

    The clock is a Gustav Becker clock.
    The back of the movement shows the GB anchor with SILESIA and a P48, so it must be made somewhere between 1910 and 1926.

    On the inside of the case there is a Trio Gong (thanx Jeremy :))
    The movement has 4 hammers that strike in pairs: a 1st hammer and 1 pair of the other 3 hammers. It is striking OK, it is a nice ding-dong.

    I have attached a picture of the top of the case. Maybe this is usefull for ID-ing this clock.

    I also attached a picture that show a rectangle where someting is missing.
    Does anyone know what is missing and have a picture of that?
    With this info I am willing to go the a clock repair man.

    The other repairing that needs to be done is the glass plates in the door and the face of the clock.

    Does anyone have more information about this clock?
    I would be very delighted ;)
     

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  18. Jeremy Woodoff

    Jeremy Woodoff Registered User
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    Re: GB clock - dating, ID?

    Wensing,

    Welcome to the message board! I have no information about the clock, but I think the gong stand says "Trio Gong" (reflecting the three-hammer note). I love the stylish case design.
     
  19. laprade

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    Re: GB clock - dating, ID?

    Hi Wensing,

    welcome to the "tower of babel", only kidding!

    The clock's age is around the 1920s. It has a slight "art deco" influence.
    There are several of this type currently up on the "m board" and you will get some idea of what is missing. It'll be a fairly simple design to match the other very basic decoration. I'll do some sketches and post them.

    There is also a piece missing from the bottom. The origins of the design of the "missing bottom" is to do with older clocks standing on a "bracket".

    The "bracket" gave way to a one-piece design (many many years ago), which hung on the wall and was easier.

    The style of the clock as well as being "deco" also comes under the family "vienna" and its predessors were loaded with knobs and eagles. Becker is probably the best known maker of such clocks.

    I think your hardest problem will be trying to match the wood.
     
  20. John Hubby

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    #270 John Hubby, May 23, 2009
    Last edited: May 23, 2009
    Re: GB clock - dating, ID?

    Wensing, thanks for posting the photos, that helps a lot to identify your clock. One question: Is there any other marking on the back plate such as the letter "O" stamped at the lower right? With regard to dating, you are correct that movements with the "SILESIA" stamp were made from 1910 to 1926. However, the very large majority were made between 1910 and 1915 as was your clock. I'll explain more below.
    This gong sequence has a couple of common names, either "ting-tang" or "bim-bam". I personally use the latter. It has a particularly pleasing sound with the GB Trio Gong, which was first used about 1909.
    While your clock has some characteristics of the later Art Deco clocks that Laprade mentions, in fact it is a late Art Nouveau design made before WWI. The exact clock is shown in the 1912 Gustav Becker catalog (recently published by Victor Tang) as Model 3081, and described as one of a group of "Cartels Art Nouveau". To me it appears to be somewhat like the Arts & Crafts style clocks made between 1907 and 1915, but the "spandrel" designs on the dial and the design of the hands are without question of Art Nouveau influence. I am attaching a scan of the catalog illustration so you can see what I have described and also what is missing on your clock. The two pieces from the door were square pyramid shaped blocks. The width dimension were about 1/4-inch wider than the fluted decorative piece still there, the overall height would have been about 5/8 inch with the edges thick enough to match the thickness of the fluted piece.

    The base of your clock is missing completely, but I think you can see from the scan what it would have looked like. It is a bit difficult to describe but it is not a solid piece. There is a flat back piece, two shaped side pieces, and a shorter front piece on which a long triangular molding is placed. This would be easily made by a good cabinetmaker. Getting wood to match will be the main challenge here.

    As for when your clock was made, my data would show between 1911 and 1914 based on the markings on the movement, the pendulum design, and of course the catalog illustration.
    It appears from the catalog scan the clock originally had flat glass panes installed. There is another identical design clock that has bevelled glass, designated Model 3181. I will post a scan of that one also for you to see. I would be very careful with the dial, as most cleaning fluids will remove the black numbers. Use only water with a very mild detergent and a very soft sponge to do any cleaning. If you don't like that result, then you probably should try to find a professional dial restoration expert to refinish the dial.

    Good luck with the restoration, and let us see the results when you are done.
     

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  21. laprade

    laprade Banned

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    #271 laprade, May 23, 2009
    Last edited: May 23, 2009
    Re: GB clock - dating, ID?

    Thanks John,

    You've saved me a drive over into the Dordogne, where a client of mine has one of those. I was almost going to say to Wensing, that sooner or later, someone would post an old catalogue. I had done a sketch from memory of a "flattened pyramid" for the bottoms of the pilasters!

    I'm amazed that the people at Beckers could possibly describe their design as being "art nouveau", that really is stretching the imagination.

    John, your right about the "arts and crafts", much nearer the mark when you look at the dial. (I have only just found that one can do a second click on the pictures and then use the + to get close, so I missed the dial detail) The case has the beginnings of "deco" with the "lines", but the very sharp cornice and rectengular door panels are definately A&C. The full "deco" style brought in the curved-rounded cornered cornice.


    The odd thing is, at the same time the older fashion "eagles and knobs" style was still being marketed just before the war. I was shown a receipt by a collector, for a vienna regulator sold in 19 "teens", for just over 16 english shillings. The other thing that happened then, was that the "eagle" was being swapped for the "dancing horse". The collector told me that for political reasons they were being changed.


    Wensing, please excuse my being ten years out!

    laprade
     
  22. wensing

    wensing New Member

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    #272 wensing, May 23, 2009
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    Re: GB clock - dating, ID?

    Laprade,
    thanks for the quick replies and for the first dating, although John as corrected it ;).

    John,
    thanks for posting so much detailed information. And many thanks for both catalog scans!

    Looking at the 2 scans, I think it most likely is model 3181, because the dail has leveled circle in it, as does mine. You can sligthly see it on the sixth attached picture from the opening post, I have attached a flash photo of the total clock also showing the leveled circle, and a non-flash (dark) close-up.

    With the visual information about the missing square shaped piramides and the missing base, the clock can be restored. I myself am not so good in restoring, I will attend a good clock-repair-guy.

    I will post some more photo's when it is finished.
     

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  23. John Hubby

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    Re: GB clock - dating, ID?

    Wensing, after a closer look at the catalog scans I agree your clock would have been Model 3181, having what I call a raised "convex" chapter ring on the dial. You can get beveled glass to fit the door and with a good cabinetmaker doing the case restoration you will have a very elegant GB clock.
     
  24. jeules0

    jeules0 Registered User

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    You want Gustav Becker? How about this one! Absolutely massive architectural key-hole style Becker with the GB Freiburg roundel on the back of the movement but no serial number that I could see.
    It is about 50" tall, spring driven, chimes on a gong, made of solid mahogany and with a wonderful slow tic-toc. It keeps excellent time: just a few seconds a week out when judged against a radio-controlled clock.
    It's a complete contrast to my 2 Becker torsion clocks!
     

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  25. intertime

    intertime New Member

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    wow jeules0 a beautiful set of Gustav Becker clocks..
    i had a brown oak tree clock just like the right one
    but my mother didnt gave up until i gave it here..

    nice picking cheers
     
  26. jeules0

    jeules0 Registered User

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    These are my two Becker Torsion clocks, small dial with disc pendulum s/n 2309789 dating c1917; the larger floral dial with 4-ball pendulum s/n 23933587 c1922. Both purchased at boot fairs here in the UK. They are now cleaned up and running well. (Details are on a thread in the 400 day section but have posted them here as well)
     

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  27. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Actually I have seen a number of rack striking clocks (both wall mounted and hall clocks) with the strike release lever having a cord attached, that is then passed through a hole in the side of the case and with a small weight at the end to hold it taut. In the dark, all you have to do is pull the cord and you will hear the most recent hour struck. I've also seen a number of grand sonnerie striking clocks with the same arrangement.

    These levers "are" used for setting the correct hour on countwheel strike clocks, but that isn't needed for rack strike. For rack strike I believe it's there to enable the option described above if so desired.
     
  28. mr.jeepster

    mr.jeepster Registered User

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    Here is a 1926 gustav becker kitchen clock
     

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  29. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    It would be very helpful if you could post a photo of the back of the movement of your clock. If there isn't a serial number I would expect the movement to be one of the GB American-style types, but having a clear photo showing all the info on the back plate would allow us to see what it actually is.
     
  30. jeules0

    jeules0 Registered User

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    Thanks, John.
    Here are photos of the back plate. As you can see: the GB Anchor and Silesia (not a roundel and Freiburg as I put in my earlier post!), along with a number P64. I've looked again but can't find a serial no. Hope you can date it from this.
     

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  31. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    OK, this makes sense. Your movement is one of the "SILESIA" grade American-style movements that were placed in production in late 1909. These don't have serial numbers and can only be dated based on the case style and other such characteristics.

    The SILESIA grade movements with the stamp under the GB logo were made mostly between 1909 and 1915, but some were made during and after WWI until early 1926.

    There are similar keyhole style clocks shown in the 1912 and 1924 GB catalogs (published by Victor Tang) but none with the heavy rounded trim around the door opening such as yours. Because of this unusual door treatment, I think your clock was probably made between 1909 and 1911, since it doesn't show up in the 1912 catalog. Also, the 1912 catalog shows your movement and the identical gong bracket/movement support whereas the latter isn't shown in the 1924 catalog.
     
  32. jeules0

    jeules0 Registered User

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    That's great, John, many thanks.
    Interesting it's so late as the case styling it what I consider to be heavy Victorian c1890.
     
  33. Greetings from Southern Illinois, small town near Mt. Vernon, IL. I havejust purchased a Gustav Becker clock but have no idea of any of the details on it other than it has no serial numbers and so far I have yet to find a case that matches its look it does have the GB under the crown on the movement and a 0 over in the lower right side of the movement. I got it for $25.00 and it is super clean and keeps perfect time. Now I wonder if you can tell me what model it is or direct me to where I can find out? I looked on the Antique Clocks Price Guide but nothing looked like it althought the Baxter I think it was called look similar. I will include a couple of pictures of this clock If you might be able to identify this it would be a big help.

    Thanks, Bruce S.
    Scheller, IL:bang:
     

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  34. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Bruce, thanks for your inquiry and photos. If you will post photos of the back of the movement I will be able to provide info regarding the model etc. Please show the whole movement and closeups of the logos and other markings.
     
  35. 124Spider

    124Spider Registered User
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    I bought this one at our recent NAWCC regional. It's a grand sonnerie, with repeater function. It sounds and looks lovely.

    BeckerLarge.jpg

    Here's the back:

    FullBack.small.jpg

    And here's a closeup of the serial number and Becker stamp:

    SerialNumber.small.jpg

    I would be grateful for any information about how much of this clock is original; I know that the glass isn't; I suspect the face isn't, and I even have some doubts about at least the top piece of the case, if not the entire case.

    Thanks.

    --Mark
     
  36. 124Spider

    124Spider Registered User
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    BTW, the serial number appears to be 616671, stamped over 615806. I have no idea, obviously, why this would have been done.
     
  37. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Mark, thanks for posting. Your clock was made at the GB Braunau, Bohemia factory about 2nd quarter 1912, based on the Braunau logo and the serial number. I magnified the photo of just the serial number, and it is evident this movement was used twice. As you have posted the original serial number was 615806, made 1st quarter 1912, then for unknown reasons was overstamped with the present serial number 616671. I have seen this done before on a very few clocks, the only explanation I can offer is that some defect was found that required the movement to be reworked and when it was put back in production sequence a new number was stamped. I will appreciate if you could check the front plate of the movement, there will be a serial number stamped there and it will be of interest to know if it was also overstamped or is the original number.

    Regarding the case design, this style was used for a few Braunau clocks right into WWI and even after the war. However, the majority produced from about 1910 were made with a box regulator style case having elaborate beveled glass doors (see serial number 616691 photo below, just 20 digits later than your clock). In my database I have serial number 614215 made early 1912 and serial number 630849 made late 1912, both with Altdeutsche style cases. The headpiece for your clock appears to be correct but that would require close inspection to say for sure. It is of similar style to others using this case so it could be original. The best way to tell if the case is original is to check the screw holes holding the movement support bracket in place, also the gong mount. If there are extra holes or "new-looking" holes it's possible the case and movement aren't original to each other. It would be appreciated if you could post a photo of the movement bracket and rod gong mount so we can see if there are other indicators.

    Yours is the first one-piece porcelain enamel dial I've seen on a Braunau clock, and certainly isn't "typical". I don't know of any way to tell for sure whether it is original, unless there are markings on the back of the dial that could show originality. It is a very attractive dial whatever its age or provenance.
     

    Attached Files:

  38. 124Spider

    124Spider Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Thanks so much, John.

    I have only just embarked on taking a clock apart; my first victim is a poorly-functioning old Seth Thomas mantel clock which I acquired for $60. After I do that, I'll perhaps have enough confidence to take the movement of my Becker off of the face; but I don't want to mess with it now (it has clearly been there for a long time, and will take some care to get it off without damaging anything).

    But I did take pictures of the back of the inside of the case. There is no sign of any trauma indicating any other holes ever were made in this case. It's in almost eerily good condition for a clock of this age.

    Here are the picture of the inside of the case, showing the pendulum and the two gong-rods:

    InsideCase.small.jpg

    InsideCaseClose.small.jpg
     
  39. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Mark, thanks for posting the gong and bracket photos. These are significant identifiers as it turns out. The first documented use of your specific rod gong mount (plain cast iron, no GB initials, specific shape) was with serial number 613434 made at the beginning of 1912. It may have been used earlier than that but so far only other designs have been documented, and this design continued to be used on out to the early 1920's.

    Since that clock was made only a few months before yours, I think it is safe to say that your case is original to the movement. As I noted above I think the headpiece is suitable even if not original, that leaves only the dial to be decided whether original or not. Since yours is the only one thus far to be seen, we can only wait for others to show up or when you do have the opportunity to separate the dial from the movement there might be evidence to confirm one way or the other.
     
  40. 124Spider

    124Spider Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Thanks again, John.

    I'm quite curious about the face, and the serial numbers, so I certainly intend to separate the face from the movement when I'm more confident that I can do so without harming the beautiful clock. When I do, I'll post here.
     
  41. rick1021

    rick1021 Registered User

    Jun 23, 2009
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    #291 rick1021, Jun 23, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 24, 2009
    I picked up this nice Gustav Clock. Im just getting in to collecting clocks and this is my first purchase. I really do not know much about this piece so if anyone can help me with the year and maybe tell me if paying $80 was to much. Its a Gustav Mantle Clock. The inside has P14 it also reads 2 two jewels One Adjustment and i guess its the serial number underneath that. Its only four numbers for what im guessing is the serial # 4433. If you could please email me some answers that would be great. I will try and post some photos now. If you could maybe also tell me what kind of wood it is. Thanks for your time. Rick
     
  42. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Rick: You have a nice clock there. Others can give you greater details about it, and we are not allowed to discuss specific values here, but I don't at all think you overpaid for this chime clock.:thumb: I never seem to be able to find such deals.
     
  43. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Rick, thanks for posting. The number you mention is the serial number, which is in a series started by Junghans when they started their takeover the Gustav Becker company in early 1926. Based on documented clocks a separate series was used for different types of clock movements but each followed the same system, starting with the number "1" and continuing until the Freiburg factory was closed at the end of 1932. For example, 400-Day clocks had their own series, Westminster and Westminster/Whittington table clocks had their series, weight driven wall clocks had their series, and hall clocks had theirs.

    In the instance of the Westminster and Westminster/Whittington clocks, about 5,000 of this type clock were produced by late 1932. Your clock was made near the end of 1931 based on the serial number.

    I am interested to know more about the jewels markings, and also if you can see which pivot has the jewels. Is it the anchor arbor pivots or the escape wheel pivots? Also, if possible could you take a closeup of the jewels stamping?

    I think your case is mahogany, although the very dark finish makes it difficult to see the graining to say for sure. In the 1932 GB catalog there are similar clocks but not exactly your model. If you can post a full front or quarter-front view it will help to find a model that is the same or nearly so. The catalog shows that this type of clock was supplied with a choice of four woods: walnut, mahogany, oak, and birch.
     
  44. rick1021

    rick1021 Registered User

    Jun 23, 2009
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    Thank you for the info. Like i said before im new to clocks and this was my first purchase so i am learning as we go here. When you said pivots and 2 jewels im not sure exactly what that means. I ordered a book about clocks so i can learn more but it is not here yet. It has the anchor on the inside. I tried taking pictyures of it and they are barely showing up but i will post some anyways. What exactly does the 2 jewels mean? Im trying to get the camera to work. I will post more pictures within the hour.
     
  45. rick1021

    rick1021 Registered User

    Jun 23, 2009
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    #295 rick1021, Jun 23, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 24, 2009
    If you tell me where to look to find the jewels i will be on for a couple hours. The anchor has like a crown on it with a cross on top of the crown and what looks like a C in the center of the crown.
     
  46. rick1021

    rick1021 Registered User

    Jun 23, 2009
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    Sorry for all of my questions, but how do i tell how many days a clock is? This Gustav does not say anywhere on it that i can see. I need a good book about these clocks. Does anyone recomend a certain book?
     
  47. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    The best way to see how many days a clock is, is to wind it up and see how long it goes until it stops. I think the clock you have pictured will go at least 8 days. If it goes less than 15 days, it would likely still be called an 8 day clock.

    If the clock has 2 jewels, the jewels are either the pallets that interact with the escape wheel teeth or there are 2 jewels with holes in them where the escape wheel pivots turn.

    The escape wheel is the wheel with the funny shaped teeth that the rocky thing works against. The slabs on the rocky thing might also be jewels in which case they are called jeweled pallets.
     
  48. rick1021

    rick1021 Registered User

    Jun 23, 2009
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    Thanks. Im still kind of lost but im going to open it up and see if i can figure it out. Im waiting for my book to get in so i can learn the different names for the different parts. Thanks again
     
  49. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Rick, thanks for the additional photos. Those confirm the info I gave earlier regarding the clock. It is exactly like Model 318 in the 1932 GB catalog, with the addition of the two carvings at each side of the dial. Also, on close inspection I think the wood is walnut and not mahogany as I guessed in my earlier note.

    With regard to the jewels, I was asking about what you said in your original post:
    . I haven't seen anything yet that looks like this stamped on the backplate so I was hoping you could clarify. If that's not actually there, no problem.

    Your clock will clean up very nicely, and you got a real bargain on the price.
     
  50. Steve S-S

    Steve S-S Registered User

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    John, sorry for the delay. The serial number is 2085455 and it was right where you said it would be. If you can provide a date and perhaps a 1912 catalog scan, I will update my photo album for this clock on this website.
    https://mb.nawcc.org/album.php?albumid=110

    Thanks. Steve
     

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