Post Your Gustav Becker Clocks Here

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Mike306p/Ansoniaman, Jul 5, 2006.

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  1. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    #1051 John Hubby, Dec 29, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2011
    David, thanks for posting! As can be seen in the GB circular logo, your clock was made at the GB Braunau, Bohemia factory. The "Made in Tschechoslovakia" stamp shows it could not have been made prior to November 11, 1918, the date of signing of the WWI Armistice that created the country of Tschechoslovakia from part of the Austro-Hungarian empire as mentioned earlier.

    Regarding when your clock was made, there are two possibllities based on others I have documented with very low serial numbers:
    • The first possibility (and IMO what actually happened) is that a limited number of "special edition" clocks were made to celebrate the formation of the new country. At this point yours is the third one with this serial number configuration, the other two are 000010 and 000012. There is at least one report from contemporary trade magazines that factories in Bohemia were prepared to immediately begin marking their goods with the "Made in Tschechoslovakia" stamp to show they were no longer subjugated to the empire. My Braunau data confirm this to be fact, in that the "normal" serial number series clocks were also stamped that way from late 1918 (serial number 815896 is the first with this stamp other than the "specials") and continuing on following the takeover of GB operations by Junghans in late 1925.
    • The Junghans takeover leads to the second possibility. At that time, the traditional GB serial number series was discontinued at both Freiburg and Braunau, and a new series started with no leading zeroes. A major difference also implemented at this time was to use individual number series for different types of clocks for example 400-Day, Westminster chime, Wall weight regulators, some hall clocks, etc. That resulted in duplicate serial numbers between the types . . :confused: I have single digit numbers and continuing past 5,000 for 400-Day and Westminster clocks made in Freiburg to confirm this practice, with three duplicate sets to date. For the Braunau factory, I've now documented seven clocks with the low serial numbers, ranging from 10 to 627. NOTE the number "10", it is stamped as such with no leading zeroes. The confirmed practice from Freiburg would strongly point to this clock being one of the post-Junghans production, and the one with the leading zeroes to be a "special".
    Hopefully we will see more clocks in the future stamped like yours, and even better one with a signed repair date or purchase date or other mark that would confirm the 1918 date.

    Regarding the case material, I have a number of Braunau box regulators documented that have VERY nice cases of birdseye maple, quarter-sawn birch, and other fine woods. These were made from about 1908 through the mid-20's, most of them with elegant bevel glass doors. A photo of one made in 1920 is attached.
     

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  2. soaringjoy

    soaringjoy Registered User

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    Let me put one thing straight first, please.
    When talking about Gustav Becker clocks, we're talking about clocks
    and movements of a higher league which were somewhat considered the
    "Mercedes" of industrial mass-produced clocks.
    Of course, of the numerous German makers of the time, there were
    some, ranking even higher. But, G.B. clocks never were cheaply made
    and they always were at least one class better than the other reknown
    makers.
    Due to the locations of the factories in Freiburg, Silesia and Braunau, Bohemia,
    G.B. supplied mainly the domestic German market and eastern
    countries.
    As a matter of fact, not many German makers had an attitude to marketing on
    the American continents; they were well fed in Europe.
    Consequently, there are by far more G.B. clocks to be found in Germany,
    Poland, or even Russia, for instance, than in the States.
    Most German clocks, now being found and collected in the U.S., were
    actually brought into the country by U.S. servicemen and tourists after
    WW 2. It is said, that some shipped in the antique and vintage clocks
    by container loads.;)

    Jurgen
     
  3. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    Great information, John! As always :). And it is much appreciated.
     
  4. ericn1300

    ericn1300 Registered User

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    Here's the picture of the pendulum, as you can see it appears to have split and been repaired with string. Also the chime hammer has a piece of felt on the striker and the chimes seem awfully muted, is that normal or can I take off the felt?
     

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  5. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Jurgen, well said. It is very interesting that in recent years there have been more GB clocks popping up from the eastern countries than about anywhere else. I think a lot of this is due to the Internet giving collectors much broader access than at any earlier time, but it supports your comments. You are also right that container loads of German and French clocks were imported to the U.S. in the years following WWII.

    I would note also, there were a number of U.S. importers who worked intimately with German manufacturers from the late 1800's to well after WWII to import major quantities of clocks to the Americas. These included Kuehl Clock Co. of Chicago, George Borgfeldt of New York, National Silver Co. and Bowler & Burdick of Cleveland, Tiffany & Co. of New York, and numerous others. They were big enough to have their logos stamped on clock movements or placed on the dials of clocks that were imported. This was particularly evident for 400-Day clocks but also for all other styles and designs. We also know that GB had a working agreement with B. H. Abrahams (BHA) to export clocks to the U.K. from about 1906 to the early 1920's, and other agreements with UK importers. I don't know the percentage of clocks that wound up in the export market but the actual number is quite substantial, for example about 15% of all the GB 400-day clocks in my database have the Kuehl Clock Co. mark on their dials between 1907 and 1925. This still shows the "big" markets for German makers were in Europe.
     
  6. tarant

    tarant Registered User
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    Some Beckers were travellers, some not. This in the middle left Broumov, came to Nachod. Few years ago reached the wall in my room. His whole route was about 70 miles within 90 years... (SN 828095). On the left - Becker with Carl Hahlweg's patent is waiting for the movement restoration. New varnish on restored case is too dark, but it gives some ehmm... "mysteriousness" ;)
     

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  7. soaringjoy

    soaringjoy Registered User

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    ericn1300, the strike hammer head had a piece of leather,
    usually "screwed" in. The felt is a replacement - exactly to
    muffle the sound.

    John, yes the importers you mentioned played an important role
    for both the UK and the U.S. markets.
    To me, it seems, as if the Germans themselves were somewhat timid,
    concerning the American market, or they just didn't care, which
    would have been arrogant, which they were, sometimes. :)
    Actually, we do know, that at times, the American manufacturers
    were solemnly complaining about lower production costs in Germany,
    based on a sales drop in the UK, which, I presume led to the well
    known McKinley Act in one way or another.
    No, the Germans premiere interest was to swamp the European market
    completely, and they did it. Until Uncle Adolf came along. Oh well.
    Jurgen
     
  8. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Thanks for the additional photos, these confirm what I was hoping to see. The device on your pendulum that moves to one side or the other is part of the DGMS 103274 patent. A later version put the adjustment part on the pendulum leader together with the trapezoid shape pendulum "hook" that was part of a separate patent yet to be identified.

    Jurgen has answered your question regarding the hammer material, the original was hard leather and not felt.
     
  9. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Piotr, photos of the movement for both clocks would be appreciated! :D The Braunau clock has a beautiful case of the type being discussed from the clock posted by David LaBounty. I presume the movement is stamped "Made in Tschechoslovakia"? The serial number indicates manufacture in third quarter 1919.
     
  10. tarant

    tarant Registered User
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    Hahlweg's Becker, the movement and the case I've already presented here (and in later posts):
    https://mb.nawcc.org/showpost.php?p=551981&postcount=714

    Braunauer is "Made in Tschechoslovakia", of course. I'll post the photos of the movement when I'll find a free day with a good light...or a free day at last.
     
  11. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Thanks, Piotr! I did find the Hallweg after I had posted my earlier note, will look forward to seeing photos of the Braunauer.
     
  12. Ulan

    Ulan Registered User

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    Eric - I have some doubts if the clock is GB complet.
    The pendulum, pulleys - sure not. I have doubt about the case as well.
    Maybe only the movement and dial is coming from GB factory?
     
  13. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    #1063 John Hubby, Dec 30, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011
    Ulan, I agree with you the pulleys on Eric's clock do not appear to be original. However, the pendulum and the movement and gong mounting bracket are identical to several other GB clocks I have documented that were made after the patent DGMS 103274 was issued. Also, it appears the mounting bracket is the "only" one ever mounted in that case (no extra holes, coloration behind the gong, etc.) so I would conclude the case is original as well. IMO the clock is an original GB and complete except for the possibility of replacement pulleys and the missing headpiece and bottom finials.

    I'm adding photos from a clock made about six months after Eric's clock for comparison, that has the same bracket, pendulum, and backplate markings/pendulum crutch. I took these photos of the actual clock and it had every appearance to be 100% original, as per others for which I have similar photos.
     

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  14. soaringjoy

    soaringjoy Registered User

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    Just for the records, speaking in terms of you know who,
    DRGM and DGMS were not patents, they were utility model
    protections by law. Slight changes in design or minor improvements
    were enough to be granted one of these, without thorough inspection
    by the authorities.
    They were also much cheaper to obtain and effect on the consumers
    was pratically the same as the (in)famous D.R.P.
    Jurgen
     
  15. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Touché . . :D . . The "book" that you-know-who put together back in 2003 is titled "Patent Listings in the Deutsche Uhrmacher-Zeitung 1877-1932", and I tend from time to time to call all the entries "patents" even though the lists of DGMS/DRGM protections granted is titled Gebrauchsmuster-Eintragungen which translates to Utility Model Entries. Lesson learned!
     
  16. tallclock

    tallclock New Member

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    I am new to this so I apologize if I have posted this incorrectly.
    I am looking for information about a clock that I have. It is beautiful and keeps excellent time. It is a bim bam. It rings on the hour and half hour, double strikes for the hour. I inherited it from my grandmother.
    The chime board reads Regina Song with the initials GB. The back however looks like the DUFA logo. I will provide pictures.
     

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  17. Ulan

    Ulan Registered User

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    Right. Rare to meet.
    Thank You John, I did not have the evidence of it.
     
  18. ericn1300

    ericn1300 Registered User

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    I agree with John, that looks like the only bracket ever to be mounted in this case and from the discoloration and fading that movement has been there for a long time. The case itself is all original including the hardware and doesn't show any signs of repair or refinishing. If the pulleys are replacements they are very close to the other pictures of GB clocks I've seen.

    I have one of the original bottom finials so I'll be able to turn a new one to match, the old one is sitting on top of the clock in the picture. The center bottom has a block outline from the missing piece. I think the original was a duplicate but smaller fluted piece with a half flat turning below it. I'll just turn one to match the side finials just a little bigger.
     

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  19. Walter Soestbergen

    Walter Soestbergen Registered User

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    Another 2 weight GB clock. The logo has Freiburg i Schl and the "Medaille d'Or stamp and the serial number is 661323. When I read the serials good on page 8 the date from this clock is 1988

    klok_3678.jpg top_3685.jpg bottom_3679.jpg uurwerk_3666.jpg uurwerk_3665-001.jpg uurwerk_3665.jpg
     
  20. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Walter, what a beautiful clock! Based on the serial number it was made in 1888 as you indicated (except for a typo). The hands on this one are particularly impressive, some of the nicest I've seen on a GB clock. Thanks very much for posting! :D
     
  21. Nick Ryan

    Nick Ryan Registered User

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    Gustav Becker Lantern Clock with nest of bells 5 in total. A beautiful clock made circa 1931 Happy Clocking, Nick
     

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  22. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Nick, thanks for posting! These are scarce so it's nice to see one in what appears to be great condition. Did you make the wall pedestal?

    What source did you use to get the 1931 manufacturing date? I have a couple of these in my database however the ones I've seen don't have serial numbers but one of them had a month/year stamp (29 8) indicating August 1929. Any info you have on this will be of interest.

    Also, will appreciate if you could post a photo of the back of the movement to show hammer and bell arrangement as well as any logos or serial numbers that might be present.
     
  23. chimeclockfan

    chimeclockfan Registered User
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    A very nice clock you own. I remember seeing a few on auction a few years ago, happy to have photographic evidence of this type of clock again.

    Bet it sounds great when it chimes.
     
  24. soaringjoy

    soaringjoy Registered User

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    #1074 soaringjoy, Jan 11, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2012
    Welcome to the board; no apologies needed. :)
    We all were pretty busy with a new MB set-up, so I guess everybody missed your post,
    me included. Sorry.

    OK, let's get right to business.
    Gustav Becker Regina Gong is one that is not seen as often as other G.B. gongs.
    What is not very commonly known is, that there was a close cooperation between
    the Vereinigte Freiburger Uhrenfabriken incl. formerly Gustav Becker (VFU) with the
    Deutsche Uhrenfabrik Popitz (DUFA), Leipzig, starting around the mid 1920s.
    We have documented identical movements with both the G.B.and the DUFA markings.
    Although DUFA usually used a "Largo Gong", the gong base seems to be the same shape.
    A 1929 DUFA catalogue shows ca. 70 tall case clocks, some very similar to yours, but no
    exact match. I do believe, both G.B. and DUFA used the dial your clock is sporting.
    Both makers had a variety of dials, pendulum bobs and weights to choose from.

    To get to the point, I suppose it doesn't really matter if your clock is a DUFA or a
    G.B., because during that period (ca. 1925 - 1930) they were both producing the
    same standards.
    There might be further clues on the rear of the clock case, a stamp or a paper label.

    What we would like to see is a picture of the movement itself, to determine the actual
    maker.

    Jurgen

    GBRegina.jpg
     
  25. Walter Soestbergen

    Walter Soestbergen Registered User

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    1 weight GB, serial number is 252709 if I read the serial information correct this one is from 1880. Size from the clock is 155cm x 44cm. The movement hangup was from wood and broken. That part has been replaced.

    regards Walter
     

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  26. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Walter, thanks once again for posting your photos of another gorgeous GB clock! :thumb: As you have already mentioned it was made in 1880, at the Freiburg, Silesia factory based on the movement serial number and logo stamps. The case is impeccable, and the only "fault" I notice is the hairline cracks in the dial chapter ring. However, these can be restored to be essentially invisible and even now do not detract from the overall appearance of your clock.

    You mention the movement support is made of wood, and I can see that in the photo of the movement. This is quite unusual for GB clocks, all the similar time-only weight clocks in my database have a metal movement support plate that fits into a cast brass bracket mounted to the back of the case. Could you provide a photo of the inside of the case to show how the movement is mounted? That will help with documentation and also to confirm how it is actually arranged.
     
  27. Walter Soestbergen

    Walter Soestbergen Registered User

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    When I have enough light I wil make a photo for you John.
     
  28. scottwnj

    scottwnj New Member

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    Gustav Becker help needed.

    I am not a clock person by any means, but I am seeking help to identify and date a clock that was brought to my consignment shop. Using a mirror I was able to find the following markings which leads me to believe it is a Gustav Becker (based on what I have read here this afternoon). Since the mirror reversed the images, I can only assume that I am reading them correctly. There are two circles with writing in them on the back of the movement. Hard to make out but I'm sure that one begins with the letters "Gus" and the other with the letters "Med". Below the circles is P26, which I believe represents the length of the pendulum. Then the numbers 1421848. The pendulum has the letter/number combination D.G.M.S 103274. So I'm pretty sure it is a Becker. The case I'm not so sure is original. I've looked at lots of photos on the net of Becker clocks, and although I've seen some similar designs, I have not found an exact match. The top of the clock is screwed to the body with brass screws and brass angles. I would think an old clock would use dowels and glue, but as I said, I know nothing about vintage clocks.
    There are no paper labels or stampings on the case. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

    Scott
     

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  29. tarant

    tarant Registered User
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    Re: Gustav Becker help needed.

    The finials, crown, hands and the weight are not original. The movement made about 1899 and the "body" of the case are OK.
     
  30. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    #1080 John Hubby, Jan 19, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2012
    Re: Gustav Becker help needed.

    Scott, firstly a warm welcome to the NAWCC Message Board, and thanks for posting your inquiry and the photos of your clock.

    I would agree with the comments provided by Piotr regarding the headpiece, finials, and hands for your clock. Going a step further, I believe the dial is a modern replacement and that the movement was originally a two-weight time and strike that has been converted to a one-weight time only. My curiosity was first piqued by the weight being off-center, since all the other GB time-only weight clocks I have documented had the weight perfectly centered with the pendulum. Looking further at the mirror image photo you made of the back of the movement (well done!) I noticed two things that I have pointed out on a copy of your photo here: 1421848 Mvmt Logos, Ser. No.jpg These include the following as numbered beside the arrows.
    • 1) There are two empty pivot holes, where the original winding drum arbors would have been located. There are likely more empty pivot holes up the right side of the movement (as you look from the back) where the strike train arbor pivots would be if the train were there. In addition, the front of the movement may still have what is left of the strike rack parts that controlled the striking, however those could have been removed without affecting the operation of the clock and there would be only the empty posts where they were located.
    • 2) The present winding drum has been added on the centerline of the movement, and has a modern gear with holes opened around the center. I can't see the actual winding drum but I suspect it has been adapted from a modern clock movement such as a Hermle.
    The "surgery" on the movement is certainly ingenious, but I really wonder why this was necessary when parts can be found or made to restore most any GB movement.

    Regarding other information, the pendulum length number is P64, which is typical of the clocks made for this style and size case. The serial number shows that it was made in late 1899 after the GB merger with five other clockmakers in Freiburg to become the "Freiburg United Clockmakers formerly Gustav Becker" (also known as VFU), but basically continued as a Becker operation using only the Becker name and trademarks.

    The DGMS 103274 refers to a utility protection for a device used to regulate the beat setting of the escapement first granted to Uhrenfabrik Concordia in 1898, who ceded rights to use the invention to the merger company. There were two versions of the design, your clock has the first in which the beat adjustment is on the pendulum rod. The second vertsion has the beat adjustment on the pendulum hanger that is suspended from the crutch pivot bridge.

    In summary it is an interesting clock that someone changed from time and strike to time-only for unknown reasons. So that this can be added to the documentation of all things Becker, I will be moving this thread to the "Post Your Gustav Becker Clocks Here" thread.
     
  31. scottwnj

    scottwnj New Member

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    Re: Gustav Becker help needed.

    Wow! You have provided much more information than I expected. I'll have to tell the consignor that the clock is not all original and has been heavily modified. I hung it in my shop and it seemed to be operating well, but it does stop after an hour or two, so something is not right. John, if I can somehow get additional photos of the movement, I'll add them to this thread for your documentation. Thank you both for your input. I am amazed that you can glean all of that info from just a few photos, and a backwards photo at that!

    Scott
     
  32. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Scott, I will look forward to seeing more pics of the movement if you can get them, so the modification I described can be confirmed and documented.
     
  33. tarant

    tarant Registered User
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    Indeed. On reversed and magnified picture changes are more clearly visible...In addition: building of the Uhrenfabrik Concordia anno 2011.
     

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  34. scottwnj

    scottwnj New Member

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    Clock was still running when I arrived at the shop this morning, so I guess it is now running OK. I attempted to take additional photos with the clock on the wall. Not sure if these will help with your documentation. The problem is that my camera can only get so close before it goes out of focus. There is a shot looking up into the mechanism from below. Another photo is through the side glass, but there are reflections of the camera visible in the photo. Finally, I put the camera inside the clock to try and capture the backside of the dial. It's a little dark but you can make out some detail. I hope this helps with your documentation. Please let me know if there is another view you would like me to try.

    Scott
     

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  35. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    #1085 John Hubby, Jan 20, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
    Scott, thanks very much for posting the additional photos. From these it is easy to see the empty pivot holes I mentioned earlier. Also, the beat adjusting device is clearly seen in the first photo, and I notice it is stamped with a DGMS number just above the adjusting knob that is different from the one on the pendulum crutch. If at all possible I would like to know what that number is, so I can look it up in the utility model files. What is visible is blurred, I can make out "GMS XX887" or something close to that. I hope you can get close enough to see the number with a magnifying glass to be sure of the numbers.

    One correction I need to make is that the beat adjusting device was actually invented by Uhrenfabrik Germania and not Concordia. Both companies did merge into the VFU vormals Gustav Becker, but I was posting from memory which isn't always the best thing to do. :bang:
     
  36. scottwnj

    scottwnj New Member

    Jan 19, 2012
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    Sorry for the delay in responding. Both numbers are the same: D.G.M.S.103274. I've attached two photos, one of the number on the crutch and the other of the pendulum. Hope this will help with your documentation. The crutch photo is reversed because I had to use a mirror.
    Number on hook.JPG
    Number on pendulum shaft.jpg
     
  37. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Scott, thanks very much for providing these photos. This is a big help in providing documentation of exactly what the design was that received the utility protection. Since we know when the DGMS was issued, that sets a "not earlier than" date for helping to determine the actual age of these clocks.

    I'm still mystified why someone would go to the trouble to convert a time/strike movement to time only. :confused:
     
  38. glr1109

    glr1109 Registered User

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    This is my latest purchase. I'm wondering if the crown is original. The main reason I question it is that it just sits on top of the clock, while there appear to be dowel holes in the top of the case. I've looked through all of the pages on this site..but they either appear to be fancier or not quite as fancy....opinions? botton web.jpg clock web.jpg Crown web.jpg Logo.JPG
     
  39. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    GLR, I would guess the crown is a replacement. It's sympathetic to the case, but the wood doesn't appear to be the same type as the main case. Also, it definitely would have matching dowels to fit the holes in the top if it were the original crown.

    Your clock was made at the GB Braunau, Bohemia factory as seen in the logos you posted. Seeing that it has a coil gong it would have been made before about 1905. If you can post a photo of the serial number and the full back plate of the movement that will be very much appreciated, also with the serial number I can give you the actual year of manufacture. Thanks in advance for that info.
     
  40. glr1109

    glr1109 Registered User

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    #1090 glr1109, Jan 29, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
    Sorry I had forgotten to include the serial number...it is 459269. I'm in touch with a person I found on e-bay to try to find a more appropriate crown. Although, this one looks fairly good...I would rather have one more appropriate to the clock.
    Greg

    GB backplate web.jpg
     
  41. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Greg, thanks for the additional photo and serial number. That shows your clock to be about three years after the date I had estimated, however I notice there is a cluster of coil gong movements around this one so it's not out of place. By the time your clock was made nearly all Braunau clocks used the rod gongs instead of coil gongs.
     
  42. philip_h

    philip_h New Member

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    Hello. I'm new to this site, but am quickly becoming a regular.
    I picked up this Gustav Becker wall clock to refurbish recently. I think it's a Westminster chime clock from around 1925 based on the research I've done so far. I'm hoping to find some information about it here. After opening it up, I quickly realized that there are several pieces missing from the chime mechanism including the rack. I'm wondering if someone has pictures of the same (or similar) movement from the face side that might help me figure out what the exact shapes of the missing pieces are. Any other interesting tidbits of information are welcome, too. Thanks!
    IMG_8926.JPG IMG_8927.JPG IMG_8928.JPG IMG_8929.JPG IMG_8930.JPG IMG_8931.JPG IMG_8932.JPG IMG_8933.JPG
     
  43. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Hi, Philip, Welcome to the message board. Your movement looks like it's missing quite a bit. I think watching ebay for a movement in better condition than yours might be your best solution. It appears the last owner gave up and made it a time only movement, assuming ther is enough there to run the time train. All the levers and chime cam, gathering pallet, etc is missing, and looks like the arbors to put them on may be broken off.
     
  44. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Philip, welcome to the NAWCC Message Board and thanks for posting your inquiry and the photos of your clock. Based on the serial number your clock was made in 1923, and the case was used for several models in the 3271 to 3279 series. I'm attaching a scan of Model 3271/72 from the 1924 GB catalog published by our member Victor Tang, which illustrates the identical case that was used for your clock. The only difference is the window in the door, which is the one shown in Model 3282-1 as illustrated in the other attached scan. The 3271 through 3279 clocks each had a different door glass, I don't know which one was your exact model. GB had many case designs that shared a common selection of door glass.
    Model 3272 Box Reg.jpg Model 3282-1 Box Reg.jpg

    As Harold mentions most of the levers and other parts for controlling the chime and strike are missing, also it appears some of the posts are missing where they were mounted. I do notice that most if not all of the gears in the three trains are present, if you could post photos of the sides and top of the movement we should be able to see what if anything is missing there. I'm attaching a scan from the same catalog illustrating the front of a movement in which the only difference is there are two sets of strike hammers at the back, one being operated by the same arbor as on your clock where there is a lever across the back to activiate one or two of the hammers to strike the hour. This may be some help. I'm also attaching a photo of the same movement as yours to compare, it was made only a few menths before yours.
    4 Gong No.7K.jpg 2420402 Mvmt Front.jpg

    The only way I know for certain to find the missing parts is to obtain another movement. You should look for movements with serial numbers between 2300000 and 2510000 to be sure the parts are interchangeable. A different design was used before and after those numbers. Good luck with your search, do keep us posted regarding yoru progress.
     
  45. philip_h

    philip_h New Member

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    First of all, thank you both for the information and helpful advise. I've taken some more pictures of the movement from different sides and angles. The time keeping part seems to work (the hands advance when I let the pendulum swing) and both the 15 minute chimes and the hour gong operate if I trigger them manually.

    IMG_8934.JPG IMG_8935.JPG IMG_8936.JPG IMG_8937.JPG IMG_8938.JPG IMG_8939.JPG IMG_8940.JPG
     
  46. soaringjoy

    soaringjoy Registered User

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    Sure, chime and strike might still work, if tripped manually.
    But, they are supposed to be activated by the center arbor and canon pinion
    (a kind of a cam, lifting a lever) and there is no connection there to the levers,
    that activate chime and strike. It can't work without the missing parts.
    I'd suggest, you post your movement with the problems in the clock repairs
    forum. The guys there will tell you exactly what's up and better, than I could.
     
  47. David B Pendley

    David B Pendley Registered User
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    Hi Guys, I hope you can help me date this G Becker Tall case. I serviced it at a customer's store and without a serial number wasn't sure on the date. It is a Time and Strike. It has extra pulleys below main wheels for chains. It uses the double gathering pin that floats on strike side. Hopefully I can attach the photos. Thanks.! FM GB1.jpg FM GB3.jpg FM GB5.jpg FM GB 4.jpg FM GB2.jpg
     
  48. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    Philip, thanks for the extra photos and description of what happens when you trigger the chime and strike trains. From these and the previous photos it seems you are missing just about all the levers, cams, and other parts that control the chime and strike sequence. Again, the only way I know of to obtain these parts would be from a donor movement, or to see if you can find a complete replacement movement and keep this one for spares. Be sure to check for movements within the serial number range I mentioned earlier to be assured you have an exact match. I have seen several of this type movement available on eBay over the past year so unless someone reading this has one and can contact you offlist I expect that would be your best bet. Good luck with your hunt, keep us posted.
     
  49. John Hubby

    John Hubby Senior Administrator Emeritus
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    David, thanks for posting. If there "is" a serial number it will be from one to four digits long and stamped right at the bottom of the back plate. The last photo you have isn't viewable, too blurry, what was that supposed to be?

    Generally this design case first shows up in the 1926 GB catalog and continues on into the 1930's, however, the large GB logo you posted was used by itself with no serial number on many GB grandfather clocks from 1926 to the end of 1932, so the age can be narrowed to that period. There are models in both the 1926 and 1932 GB catalogs, part of which were published in Tran Duy Ly's "Gustav Becker Clocks" book, that are very similar to this clock but I couldn't find the exact one. These are well built and good runners.

    The two idler pulleys at the bottom of the movement are there to keep the pull chains together and away from the relatively large diameter weight shells. This feature showed up on two-weight chain driven GB grandfathers in the years just before WWI, but were continued in use until the last GB logo clock was made in Freiburg in 1932.
     
  50. David B Pendley

    David B Pendley Registered User
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    Thanks John, the one photo was a faint mark...but it's worse in photo. I was hoping it would enhance it. Thanks again.
     

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