• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Post Your Gustav Becker 400-Day Clocks Here

KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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I agree that seeing the logo on the bottom of the front plate is unusual. Looks like the serial number 176XXXX places it in early 1904. Have you been able to decipher the scratching on the back plate?

Kurt
 

gintarasb64

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Oct 1, 2012
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I agree that seeing the logo on the bottom of the front plate is unusual. Looks like the serial number 176XXXX places it in early 1904. Have you been able to decipher the scratching on the back plate?

Kurt
Kurt, thank you. Serial number is 1761992.
Gintaras
 

etmb61

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Oct 25, 2010
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Sharing pictures of my new purchace - nice GB clock with small dial and GB logo on the front plate. Never see such model before. Unfortunatelly original pendulum is missing, I use replacement with different SN. Any comments would be very interesting. Regards
Gintaras

View attachment 565596 View attachment 565597 View attachment 565599 View attachment 565600 View attachment 565601 View attachment 565602 View attachment 565603
Gintaras,

Here is one other like yours:
Gustav Becker Decorative Brass Embellishers.

Eric
 

John Hubby

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Sharing pictures of GB 400 day skeleton clock. Maybe would be interesting for the records.
Gintaras
Gintaras thanks for posting. Very tardy reply, but your clock is one of those made in the first production run of the skeleton clocks in January 1910. About 600 clocks were made in this batch, the first 90 and the final 100 of this run being made for B. H. Abrahams of London and stamped with the BHA logo per Plate 1033. Your clock has plate 1189. As best I can tell the clock is completely original, only missing the suspension guard.

All of the clocks in this first batch were essentially identical, all with oval mahogany base with oval glass dome, stamped and embossed silver color metal dial with black numbers, and a standard GB disc pendulum. There are two in my data that have had the original pendulum replaced with a mis-matched serial number No. 17 chandelier style pendulum. This is very evidently due to Charles Terwilliger concluding that "all" the GB skeleton clocks would have the skeletonized No 17, when in fact less than half actually were originally fitted with that pendulum design.
 
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John Hubby

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Sharing pictures of my new purchace - nice GB clock with small dial and GB logo on the front plate. Never see such model before. Unfortunatelly original pendulum is missing, I use replacement with different SN. Any comments would be very interesting. Regards
Gintaras
Gintaras, thanks for posting this clock as well. These with the GB logo on the front plate are relatively few, and yours at least for now has the highest serial number in my data for this model, made in early 1904.

You mention you have used a replacement pendulum, from what I can see this one is from a clock that was at least a few years newer. Could you provide me the serial number of the pendulum? I keep this kind of information and have been successful to find matching clocks on a few occasions.
 

gintarasb64

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Oct 1, 2012
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Gintaras, thanks for posting this clock as well. These with the GB logo on the front plate are relatively few, and yours at least for now has the highest serial number in my data for this model, made in early 1904.

You mention you have used a replacement pendulum, from what I can see this one is from a clock that was at least a few years newer. Could you provide me the serial number of the pendulum? I keep this kind of information and have been successful to find matching clocks on a few occasions.
John, thank you for your comments. It is nice to hear you after some silence :) The pendulum number is 2126014. I also have movement with the same SN. I bought it not complete for spares. Regards
Gintaras
 

John Hubby

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John, thank you for your comments. It is nice to hear you after some silence :) The pendulum number is 2126014. I also have movement with the same SN. I bought it not complete for spares. Regards
Gintaras
Thanks for the info. This pendulum and the scrap movement with the same serial number was made near the end of 1909, nearly six years after the clock it is now serving.
 

Mark North East Texas

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I’m new here and don’t know anything about clocks. Inherited this clock from a Great Uncle, hasn’t ran in many years. The bottom tension block had slipped off torsion spring and the pendulum wasn’t suspended. I reattached the lower block. After a couple of days running, it is fast by about 15 minutes in 24 hours. I’m not sure how to slow it down, or that I have the lower block in the correct length. Can you tell me how much I should I wind it, should I wind it till it stops? Also was wanted to find out the date it was made. Thanks for any help.

C6E6FF61-63E1-4317-815E-14EA3FAEBE20.jpeg 141EEDD9-480F-4E49-905F-AA5F461D9B93.jpeg 033E8E4A-DCA9-4B7C-86BA-05564FC23873.jpeg 1A2BCE07-6689-4EDC-9E8D-540533826CE6.jpeg B0332941-75D9-4F79-B295-32776A127E5D.jpeg
 

KurtinSA

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Welcome to the message board, Mark! Nice looking survivor! And the serial numbers match which is a good thing. I think your pendulum is suspended just fine...it can't go that much lower from the looks of things. In order to slow the clock down, you will need a double ended key similar to either of the two on the right in this picture:

400 day clock keys , which one goes where?

You would take the small end of the key and turn the small threaded rod so that the small weights on top of the pendulum move outward. You should see one end of the rod with four flats on it...turn it in the direction of the "S" stamped into the small weight.

As for build date, from the serial number it appears the clock was built during the first quarter of 1923.

Kurt
 

Mark North East Texas

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Thank you Kurt, for the quick reply. I will have to try to slow it this week. The wife and I are glad it is keeping time, kinda, once again. Can you tell me about winding it. I have always heard you should not overwind them!?
 

KurtinSA

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As for winding, I think it takes a bit of feel. While winding it, you will feel it get tighter and tighter...eventually it will be a hard stop. I don't like going to the hard stop, so when I feel it getting tighter with each click, I basically stop. They say that in order to get the best time regulation out of the clocks, you should wind them twice a year, say January 1 and July 1. If you do that, you don't need to go that near the full stop.

Kurt
 

whatgoesaround

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You inherited a very nice clock. Judging from the spread of the tiny weights on the pendulum, it is nearly as slow as you are going to get it. I doubt that adjusting them will be sufficient to get it to slow down that much. Perhaps, it is fluttering, in which case you can raise the fork a miniscule amount or you will need to thin the suspension spring. Both are easy to do, but I suggest searching the forum for a little more information before proceeding or just ask here if you are having trouble.
 
Apr 7, 2020
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Hi everyone,

I recently bought a Gustav Becker 400 Day Clock at an estate auction. My knowledge about clocks is very humble and I would like some information from experts on this one. I think the serial number is 1731911.

I agree it is not in the best condition and it needs some repairs.

1.jpeg 5.jpeg 4.jpeg 9.jpeg 8.jpeg 7.jpeg 3.jpeg 2.jpeg
 

sunand

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Hi everyone,

I recently bought a Gustav Becker 400 Day Clock at an estate auction. My knowledge about clocks is very humble and I would like some information from experts on this one. I think the serial number is 1731911.

I agree it is not in the best condition and it needs some repairs.

View attachment 581553 View attachment 581554 View attachment 581555 View attachment 581557 View attachment 581558 View attachment 581559 View attachment 581560 View attachment 581561





Hi,
I think you have a prized acquisition. John will be able to give you correctand important information on the design features of the clock and its completeness as on 1903 (when it was made). What is amazing is:-
1.It is probably the earliest GB 400 day starting with `17'. the last earliest one is I think 1732001 of mid 1903
2. I have never seen a GB with this strange top block arrangement.Even the fork is uniquely fixed to the wire.Not clear from the photos. Some close ups from three sides will help.
3. the pallet movement upright pin again has something at the top.
All these are interesting changes, and may be a part of some prototype designs introduced for a limited time? But otherwise the clock looks complete, and will good with cleaning and polishing. The key, may not be the original one, but thats expected after so long.
I think, it's a great find. Lets wait for expert comments. Wonder where you got it?
Sunand
 

sunand

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Hi Kamil,
Did you manage the golden filigree hands for the clock?I procured a pair recently from a GB owner, for a similar rectangular clock . Send me your email to sunandk2004@gmail.com. In the meanwhile, I'll trace the contact.

Regards

Sunand
 
Apr 7, 2020
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0
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32
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Hi,
I think you have a prized acquisition. John will be able to give you correctand important information on the design features of the clock and its completeness as on 1903 (when it was made). What is amazing is:-
1.It is probably the earliest GB 400 day starting with `17'. the last earliest one is I think 1732001 of mid 1903
2. I have never seen a GB with this strange top block arrangement.Even the fork is uniquely fixed to the wire.Not clear from the photos. Some close ups from three sides will help.
3. the pallet movement upright pin again has something at the top.
All these are interesting changes, and may be a part of some prototype designs introduced for a limited time? But otherwise the clock looks complete, and will good with cleaning and polishing. The key, may not be the original one, but thats expected after so long.
I think, it's a great find. Lets wait for expert comments. Wonder where you got it?
Sunand
Thank you Sunand for the information above.

Interesting! I never thought it would be that old and unique. To answer your question, I got it from an estate auction a week ago. The clock was clean, but the dome had spiderweb with some spiders living it. It seemed to be stored and no one touched it for a while.

I will be waiting for John to listen from him.
 

KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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Nice...I like the bandstands. This was likely one of the last 100 clocks built in 1932 before Gustav Becker finally closed shop. I have one a few numbers before that with a regular disk pendulum. You might want to straighten that bottom block...the suspension spring comes in at an angle and strains the wire but also may contribute to a wobbly rotation of the pendulum.

Kurt
 
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Meyer

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Last week I found a Gustav Becker 400 days clock in a small antique shop. The serial number is 2442618, there is no engraving on the pendulum. I estimate it to be from late 1923 or early 1924 ?

There is no adjusting screws under the base to level it, so how do I level it so the torsion spring is in the center of the lower housing ? (See last photo)

Thank you, it has been interesting to read all the posts.

Kind regards
Meyer GB - 1.JPG GB - 2.JPG GB - 3.JPG GB - 4.JPG
 

KurtinSA

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Meyer -

Welcome to the message board! Nice find...hopefully the dome is in good shape and is original. I would date the clock to late 1922 based upon tables presented on the forum in the past. As for leveling, about all you can do is to shim it. I use small strips of old credit cards at the appropriate spot to bring the base into level. The picture you show of the suspension spring doesn't look too bad...I think it would run as is.

Kurt
 

Meyer

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Thank you Kurt for the welcoming and replies.
It is already running, as I had to shim to get it as shown in there picture :)

-Meyer
 

Meyer

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Sep 1, 2020
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I do not know if this is the right forum to ask ?

The dead beat escapement is not correct adjusted, so my GB is jumping minuttes. The adjustable nut to adjust the distance is completely beat up, and is stuck, do anyone have experience freeing it or replacing it ?

I assume it is mounted with a tight fit, and should be possible to press it out ?

Kindest regards
-Meyer
 

Dells

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Oct 18, 2019
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If it’s jumping minutes it’s more likely to be flutter IE the fork is in the wrong place on the suspension spring.
Dell
 

Bod

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Mar 10, 2019
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I do not know if this is the right forum to ask ?

The dead beat escapement is not correct adjusted, so my GB is jumping minuttes. The adjustable nut to adjust the distance is completely beat up, and is stuck, do anyone have experience freeing it or replacing it ?

I assume it is mounted with a tight fit, and should be possible to press it out ?

Kindest regards
-Meyer
Could you post some photos of the adjustable nut, and clear photo of the back of the clock. This will help.

Bod.
 

Meyer

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Sep 1, 2020
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If it’s jumping minutes it’s more likely to be flutter IE the fork is in the wrong place on the suspension spring.
Dell
Thank you Dells,
That makes sense, I will see if I can adjust it, I assume it should be raised slightly.
 

Meyer

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Sep 1, 2020
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The clock is now running as it should, and have find it's final place on an old Chinese furniture with two old english chamber candle sticks :)

Thanks for the support to make this old clock run correctly again.

Kinesisk skænk.jpg
 

milou

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Jan 11, 2021
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Hello everyone

I have read quite a few posts on 400 day clocks as I have three of them that I will have to repair. They are not worth of being presented here, compared to the ones you collect. Anyway it will give me a chance to train on them.
I contact you because I have seen an offer for a Gustav Becker allegedly from 1905 - 1910. The number on the back plate is 3549. Is it possible to confirm the date of manufacture based on this number. I don't know if there is a serial number on the base of the pendulum.
Thanks in advance for your help
milou
 

KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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milou -

We would need to see the back plate showing the number as well as any logos that are visible. Beckers were built in essentially two places, Freiburg and Braunau. The serial numbers are usually many digits, 6 or 7 in total. However, beginning in 1925 Gustav Becker decided to start the numbering over and only used this scheme from 1925 to 1932. I suspect that your 4-digit number falls into the category, likely making it built in Freiburg in the first half of 1930. The factory closed in 1932 and all supplies were purchased by Junghans.

Kurt
 

KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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I think that confirms what I was saying. I have a clock that is about 500 numbers after yours and it looks similar. However, the upper suspension spring support on your clock is different than mine...I don't think I've see that before on a Becker. Yours looks like ones I've seen on early JUF clocks. I think people call it the C- or E-blocks because they look like the letter C or E.

Kurt
 

milou

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Thank you guys, I finally didn't buy the clock. The seller did some repairs on it and probably added spares from another movement.
milou
 

Rodrigo A

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Jul 24, 2020
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Hi everyone,

I recently picked up my first 400 day clock, a Gustav Becker SN 2250208. Based on some reading I have done - i.e. this forum, thank you all - here is what I was able to find based on your research/reports. This is probably a model No. 500 Gustav Becker produced for Kuehl Clock Co. of Chicago and Berlin ('K.C.Co. Germany' on the dial), it has a wood (mahogany?) base, and the number on the pendulum matches the movement; the pendulum weighs 382 grams and the glass dome appears to be original. I would like to ask two questions. First, it seems the clock would be from ~1910, but there is a plate on the base indicating 1906/07, which I assume is incorrect and put on the base at a later date. Second, can you provide guidance as to what spring I should purchase? I would like to try to get it running but which one to purchase is not clear to me.

Thank you,



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KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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Welcome to the message board! The small plaque appears to be wrong...from John Hubby's serial number dating, the date of production is about the last half of 1912. Maybe someone can find this clock in a catalog of the era...I've heard mention of a 1912 catalog. While John's numbers could vary a bit, I don't think it is off by 5-6 years! As for the suspension spring, the 382 grams (~13.5 oz) is right in there with some of the pendulums that I have for GB. I would think that you should use a 0.004" thick spring as this is typically what the repair guide shows for full size Becker clocks.

Kurt
 

Mark North East Texas

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Welcome to the message board, Mark! Nice looking survivor! And the serial numbers match which is a good thing. I think your pendulum is suspended just fine...it can't go that much lower from the looks of things. In order to slow the clock down, you will need a double ended key similar to either of the two on the right in this picture:

400 day clock keys , which one goes where?

You would take the small end of the key and turn the small threaded rod so that the small weights on top of the pendulum move outward. You should see one end of the rod with four flats on it...turn it in the direction of the "S" stamped into the small weight.

As for build date, from the serial number it appears the clock was built during the first quarter of 1923.

Kurt
Sooo, I finally got around to looking at my 400 day above. It had stopped running months ago and I figured it needed winding. I adjusted the weights outward in an attempt to slow it down a little then wound it and it stopped running. Gave it a little spin to start again and ran and stopped again. Any ideas or suggestions. Thank you,
 

Bod

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Mar 10, 2019
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Sooo, I finally got around to looking at my 400 day above. It had stopped running months ago and I figured it needed winding. I adjusted the weights outward in an attempt to slow it down a little then wound it and it stopped running. Gave it a little spin to start again and ran and stopped again. Any ideas or suggestions. Thank you,
Photographs of the clock will help to show the situation with it. The photo must show the clearly the back of the clock.
There are many reasons to stop these clocks, most are cured by simple means, photos will ensure the best advice.

Bod
 

Mark North East Texas

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Photographs of the clock will help to show the situation with it. The photo must show the clearly the back of the clock.
There are many reasons to stop these clocks, most are cured by simple means, photos will ensure the best advice.

Bod
Thanks for the reply. Guess the photos I posted above on March 10, 2020 don’t show enough detail!? I’ll try to get better photos posted.
 

Bod

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Mar 10, 2019
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Thanks for the reply. Guess the photos I posted above on March 10, 2020 don’t show enough detail!? I’ll try to get better photos posted.
Sorry didn't realise this had been covered before.
The previous winding information is good advice.
As for it's current not running, it may need a service and clean, along with resetting the beat, it should run.

Bod.
 

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