Post your favorite American fusee clock.

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jan 31, 2010.

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  1. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I knew I forgot something. There did appear to be some taper to the winding drum. Due to the presence of cord, it was hard to tell.

    "Forme fruste", basically meant to indicate an atypical or incomplete manifestation of something. Thought it applies here.

    RM
     
  2. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    RM,

    Thanks for checking yours and confirming that the winding drum was tapered. I'm assuming you're referring to the same model clock as mine (the more delicately proportioned of the two mini-empires). I hate to ask the next question, given the amount of effort involved to answer it (unless you have photos that provide the answer without having to dismantle the clocks). Do your other fake fusees all have standard, cylindrical-shaped winding drums or are some tapered? The same question applies to others with Jerome fake fusee clocks.

    BTW, I agree with your use of "forme fruste."

    Mike
     
  3. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I believe they do. Again, some are obscured by wrapped line.

    RM
     
  4. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #204 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Nov 25, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2016
    Out of interest, I was perusing the recent results of past sales of an auctioneer in the UK.

    I must say, there were many items that appeared to be very nice examples of carriage clocks, bracket clocks, wall clocks, etc. It certainly provided a very different and refreshing perspective on clocks made outside of the U.S. than one generally gets if one relies solely upon the MB. Also, lots of complete tall case clocks that seem to have been unsold in large #'s or if they did sell, the price seemed rather reasonable. Also a slew of orphaned movements with dials and seat boards, many of which appeared to be early to my relatively untrained eye. Certainly some opportunities there?

    But I digress.

    I came across this French clock: http://www.gardinerhoulgate.co.uk/Catalogues/cw271016/lot1508.html

    Note the form of the case and the use of inlay, in this instance, brass (boulle work). Not hard to mimic with gold paint??

    Now check out the pix below.

    Look familiar??

    IMG_3601.jpg IMG_1185.JPG

    See especially the 2 larger 8 day fusee shelf clocks on either side of the smaller lever movement clock. I've shown them again side by side in the second pic. By the way, all 3 have previously been discussed in detail on the MB.

    I wonder if a French boulle work cased clock similar to the one shown in the above link imported into the US may have been Jerome's design source?

    Now, see NAWCC Bulletin Supplement # 15, page 93, figure 214. There is reproduced an image from Jerome's 1853 catalog of a model of clock called the "Paris Style, 8 day". Sure is a Paris style? Well, I think it is in fact an illustration of one of the 2 larger fusee clocks I've shown above whose design was inspired by a similar French clock!! I do not think it in fact refers to the clock shown in figure 215 on the same page. It looks nothing like it.

    There is one major hole in my hypothesis. The cases of the clocks shown above are all ebonized wood decorated with gilt and inlaid with MOP. Finally, the very tops of the cases of the French and Jerome examples are a bit different. I further assert (gee, I hope I'm not hearing cracking sounds as I venture further out on this tree limb) that the catalog entry may just not have been accurate.

    Anyhow, take a look and share your thoughts.

    RM
     
  5. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    RM,

    Nice job of putting 2 and 2 together. I think you've hit the nail on the head. Although there is a difference, as you point out, between the 1853 catalog version of the 8-day Paris and your versions, see below for a picture of the 30-hr Paris from the same catalog. Even if the catalog is correct regarding the case for the 8-day version, it's possible the line was simplified the following year.

    As for how Jerome learned of the French clock with boulle work, it's also possible that Jerome's Liverpool office would have been attuned to what was fashionable in the European market. And the adaptation of the case elements to the simpler (and cheaper) ebonized wood with MOP inlay and gilt work is very much in keeping with Jerome's modus operandi.

    I agree that the clock in figure 215 in Rags to Riches is not the Paris.

    Mike
     

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  6. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    What would be the difference between the "Paris" and the "Paris Style?" Was there a "basic clock" called the "Paris," and then other clocks modeled after it and referred to as "Paris Style?"
     
  7. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #207 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Nov 27, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2016
    Thanks!

    Going back to the 1853 catalog illustration in your posting. Though it states it is the "Paris style, 30 hour", that case is the essentially the same as my two 8 day fusee clocks. I will say, however that though close, the height of my clocks is about 1/2 to 3/4 " taller. In fact, if one compares the cases of my 2 clocks side by side, they are not truly identical dimensions wise. Note that the catalog illustrations also mentions that there is a striking lever movement version of that clock.

    So, the plot thickens. See Bulletin 15, page 94, figure 219. There is an illustration from Jerome's 1853 catalog called "Paris Style, Lever/Silent". Well, I believe THAT is the middle clock shown in my pic below and discussed previously on the MB in another thread. The height stated in the catalog is 10". Mine measures 10 1/4 inches.

    So, I believe in 1853 Jerome was referring to a line of clocks he called the "Paris Style" that shared a basic case design available in at least in 2 sizes, about 16" and 10 " and with 8 day (fusee??), 30 hour striking (pendulum and lever??) and a smaller "silent" lever model. Provided a number of options and undoubtedly a number of price points to meet anyone's budget. The design of the clock was, in my mind, undoubtedly inspired by, if not copied from, the French prototype I have previously linked to.

    In the same catalog, there is clear evidence for ample precedent for this. Note he refers to the "Union Style" (italics are mine) case, basically a line of clocks of a basic case design which was available with a myriad of options. They included cases that were veneered or ebonized with gilt and MOP inlay or veneered with gilt stenciling, movements which may be lever, fusee, pendulum, etc.

    As pointed out by Mike, Jerome had strong connections to Europe who probably helped to keep him abreast of the latest styles especially in what was considered the epicenter of fashion of the day, Paris. In fact, want to imply something is very much fashionable, call it "Paris Style".

    Now, I can understand how a clock like this would appeal to Americans wishing to feel that they were in step with the latest fashions from Paris and where the import would be harder to come by and probably rather expensive. However, one would think that sending American imitations of French clocks to England wouldn't make sense. I bet they had the same appeal there and were significantly less expensive. An example of Jerome beating his European competitors with the ability to produce in relatively large #'s a reasonable facsimile at a very reasonable price?

    RM
     
  8. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #208 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Oct 27, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2017
    I haven't posted any American fusee clocks in a while. Thought it might be time to post another.

    E.C. Brewster created an early 8 day brass movement with a brass back plate with a rack and snail strike. They were often die stamped with a serial #. The number is preceded by "No".

    A weight driven version of this movement was placed in empire style cases with either carved crests or a cornice. See this thread for a description of one of those clocks with the E.C. Brewster label as well some additional reading and links to references:

    And it has a serial #!!

    What is believed to be an early form of this movement is found in empire cases bearing the Davis & Barber label. See this thread for a nice example of that clock along with links to references:

    Davis & Barber GA triple decker

    The use of these believed to be "early" forms of the movement by Davis and Barber has been previously described.

    This movement was also used with a detached fusee in beehive and smaller empire style cases. They represent some of the earliest forms of manufactured CT fusee clocks. These clocks and their movements are discussed extensively in the following Bulletin articles.

    This article by Tom Grimshaw is quite comprehensive: http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1980/articles/1980/207/207_326a.pdf

    A good read.

    I will refer to this article as "Grimshaw 1".

    Mr. Grimshaw updates some of the information previously provided as well as his table of serial numbers in this article: http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1990/articles/1993/285/285_436.pdf

    Another good read.

    I will refer to this article as "Grimshaw 2".

    Finally, this RAN item from the Bulletin has some additional information: http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/1990/articles/1994/290/290_358.pdf

    One can also find information about these movements and clocks in Roberts' "Ives" book, too.

    The subject clock is a beehive.

    It is mahogany and mahogany veneer which is well figured and retains it's original grungy finish:

    e.c. brewster 1.JPG

    It's missing the bone escutcheon. IMCO, a wonderful original cut and ground glass.

    This is how it looks from behind with the backboard removed:

    e.c. brewster 5.JPG

    According to Grimshaw 1, the use of the "extra support" in the upper arch, groove in the baseboard and lack of feet mark this as a "standard model" case.

    Here is the dial:

    e.c. brewster 3.JPG

    It is original signed zinc. Zinc, iron and wood were used. The minute hand is not original.

    Here is the movement and fusee "powerpack":

    e.c. brewster 6.JPG

    Note the stop works, gong base and fusees.

    See how the gong base helps to support the movement:

    e.c. brewster 8.JPG

    Whoops, hit respond to thread by accident. Here's more.

    It does have a serial number:

    e.c. brewster 7.JPG

    In both Grimshaw 1 and 2, this clock is listed in the table of movements.

    As per those articles, this is the "standard" movement.

    The fusees are also typical of this movement:

    E.C. Brewster fusee beehive 1.JPG

    The fusees coupled with the supposedly earlier movements had screws in the center and some other differences. Again see Grimshaw 1.

    What makes this clock interesting, to me, are the graphite inscriptions to be found. Here's one:

    e.c. brewster 9.JPG

    Here's the other:

    e.c. brewster 10.JPG

    His name and "New York" are also scratched into the back of the ORIGINAL pendulum bob as well. Didn't photograph well.

    A J. Cropsey inscribed this clock with what I believe to be the date he acquired the clock, 1836. I got all excited. Could this be Jasper Cropsey, the 19th century NYS Hudson River School artist I asked myself?!?!

    Well no. This clock was recently deaccessioned from the Rowell Collection @ Dartmouth College. Here's an interesting piece that they posted on the library website in the 1990's about the collection:

    Dr. Rowell's Clocks

    Scroll down a bit.

    Well it's a John Cropsey who was a haberdasher in NYC who acquired the clock in 1836!

    Oh well, still interesting.

    A critical comment. I am not sure I totally accept Mr. Grimshaw's strenuous attempts to impose a chronological order upon these clocks and movements. I'm not sure the serial numbers are truly chronological or serial. For example, another beehive where the movement has a lower serial number is inscribed by the owner with a date of 1838.

    Anyhow, comments and thoughts welcome.

    RM
     
  9. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    There was a clock that sold in the ROSFA auction 1 week ago.

    See this:

    1017_481-533

    Scroll down to lot # 514.

    It is a clock very similar to the very first one I posted on this thread but not in nearly as good condition.

    I believe that a careful comparison of the pix in the auction catalog to the pix of the clock in Taylor and Roberts "Forestville Clock Makers", page 102, figures 95 A and 95B confirms that they are pix of the very same clock. Compare the remnants of the upper glass decoration, the crack in the back board, the black streak on the corner of the front plate, viewer's right plus other "fingerprints" like veneer patterns, etc.

    By the way, I find it a pain that the new soft ware takes me to the first posting on the first page rather than the last posting on the last page.

    RM
     
  10. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    RM,
    Glad that you were able to track down the mysterious J. Cropsey, even if it turns out he wasn't the Hudson River school artist. Wonderful bit of sleuthing on your part. And yet another reason to appreciate these 19th century American clocks as more than simply objects to occupy shelves and tables.

    I agree with your assessment of the Smith & Goodrich clock from the recent auction: definitely the same as the one in Forestville Clockmakers.

    One thing to consider when it comes to owner inscriptions on clocks is that they reflect the date of purchase, not date of manufacture. A clock could have been gathering dust on a store shelf for months or years after it was made. That could easily account for the apparently out of sequence serial numbers. Another thing that I suspect was common is that movement making and case making were somewhat independent of each other. The movement making shop would have been churning out many movements during a day, and they may have ended up in bins (with first made at the bottom) waiting to be placed in cases. Similarly for labels: a batch of labels starts to run low, so they order another; the new batch arrives and gets piled on top of the old ones. If this happened to coincide with a change in movement design or maker's stamp, you could end up with "older" movements associated with "newer" labels, and vice versa. These latter types of out of sequence occurrences would not explain the 2+ year sequence issue you note in the Brewster movements, but they provide an innocent explanation for the variety of labels, movements, and maker's stamps that are seen in clocks manufactured (especially by Jerome) within a relatively short time span (say, months).
    Mike
     
  11. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Bob, if you click the time & date below the id of the last poster in a thread, it should take you to the last post in the thread.

    Ralph
     
  12. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks Mike.

    I agree with the points you make as well.

    Ah-ha! Thanks.

    RM
     
  13. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I spent New Year's in my typical fashion. Switching between 2 cable stations. One was running a "Twilight Zone" marathon, the other a marathon of that 1960's "Batman" TV series with Adam West. High Camp. I dozed off well before midnight.

    However, that leaves me unimpaired the next day which is good as around here, there are antique shows and antique shop open houses (= a decent "feed") on New Year's Day.

    I went to one show in nearby NH (found a nice Shaker bentwood box in original red paint) and being a bit "antiqued out" I was planning upon going home. However, at the last minute I decided to go to an open house at a group shop I regularly pick that was just down the road a piece.

    Yes, they served everything from wings to shrimp cocktail to petit fours and so on. As I wandered about the shop with my paper plate of food and a plastic cup of non-alcoholic punch, I spied this clock:

    atkins 1.JPG

    Rosewood case with ripple molding in a wonderful undoubtedly grungy original surface. No, won't refinish. I believe that the old surface enhances the beauty of the wood and the creator would be pleased with it's unmolested survival. Note the original bone knobs.

    I think a great original glass which, in my experience, is a bit unusual with a blue background?:

    atkins 2.JPG

    I opened the lower door to look at the reverse of the tablet and here's what I saw:

    atkins 3.JPG

    I'm quite comfortable with it's originality.

    I then looked for a label and saw this:

    atkins 4.JPG

    I was not able to pull what would later prove to be the original unmessed with dial. Using a flash light, I did peek up into the case, saw the movement and confirmed the label and again I felt comfortable with the originality.

    Up until this point, I refused to look at the price tag believing I would be heart broken and not able to afford it. Not so. And the seller, whom I know well and has generally been a real "mensch", was able to do better when called by the shop owner.

    Here's the movement as eventually revealed:

    atkins 7.JPG '

    Still has old "gut" cords.

    Here's a close-up revealing a couple of unspoked tin (?) plated gears and the stop works:

    atkins 5.JPG

    This is an Atkins Clock Mfg. Co. 30 day fusee clock. These clocks are discussed in the wonderful reference "The Clocks of Irenius Atkins" by Gregory and King. See pages 49-51. Especially see page 50, figures 211a, 201b, 203.

    According to the authors, the Atkins Clock Mfg Co. followed Atkins, Whiting and Co. It was formed in 10/15/1855 with operations continuing at the old Atkins factory. The firm went bankrupt in 1/3/1857. A short lived company which would seem to make a clock with this label rather uncommon?

    The authors refer to this movement as the "production movement". Clocks, both shelf and wall, with this basic movement and fusee configuration were also equipped with "wagon" or "pony" springs in frames as the motive power using Ives' patents. I believe the use of unspoked tin (nickel?) plated wheels represented the use of left over parts.

    This movement is also discussed in my favorite Bulletin Supplement, #9:

    https://nawcc.org/images/stories/publications/PubSupplementsPDFs/sup_9_47.pdf

    Now to find a wagon/pony spring version.

    Well, how about some superfluidity? No? Tough. It's my thread.

    Jim recently started a wonderful thread about American made "Act of Parliament" clocks. In that organic way discussions flow, it lead to a discussion of Boston's Old North Church, Longfellow and Revere's ride. In that vein, I thought I would post a painting by a Willard!! No, not those Willards, Archibald Willard.

    Here's a response I received to an inquiry about the genealogy of Mr. Willard:

    Thank you for contacting the Ohio History Connection. Although what we have in our collection has to do primarily with Archibald’s career as an artist, I was able to find some of Archibald’s geneology online.

    It doesn’t appear that Archibald is directly related to the Willard family in Boston, MA. According to his Sons of the American Revolution Application his family line comes from Vermont to Ohio. Here is a link to his application which is available on ancestry listing his grandfather Samuel Willard and his great-grandfather Captain Jonathan Willard.

    https://www.ancestrylibrary.com/interactive/2204/32596_242162-00324?pid=339772&backurl=https://search.ancestrylibrary.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?_phsrc%3DKSR161%26_phstart%3DsuccessSource%26usePUBJs%3Dtrue%26qh%3DTjcjzX%252Buq93f26r%252BLjr41w%253D%253D%26gss%3Dangs-g%26new%3D1%26rank%3D1%26gsfn%3Darchibald%26gsfn_x%3D0%26gsln%3Dwillard%26gsln_x%3D0%26msypn__ftp%3DBedford,%2520Cuyahoga,%2520Ohio,%2520USA%26msypn%3D50940%26msbdy%3D1836%26catbucket%3Drstp%26MSAV%3D0%26uidh%3Dxp3%26pcat%3DROOT_CATEGORY%26h%3D339772%26dbid%3D2204%26indiv%3D1%26ml_rpos%3D4&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=KSR161&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true#?imageId=32596_242162-00325

    There is still a chance small chance that he might have been related to Simon Willard distantly. Simon Willard the clockmaker is a descendant of Simon of Kent who arrived from England to help found Concord, Massachusetts. The family is rather well documented in early American History, but I can’t find anything to lead me to believe that Archibald Willard is in Simon Willard the clockmaker’s direct family line.

    So no, not connected to those Willards.

    Archibald Willard was a self-taught coach painter from Ohio. In honor of the American Centennial, he would paint in 1875 what would become one of the most iconic paintings of the 19th century.

    It was originally title "Yankee Doodle Dandy":

    spirit_of_1776.jpg

    It caused a sensation in a nation that had just survived a bloody Civil War a mere 10 years before. It would go on to be displayed in Philadelphia in 1876.

    Ultimately it would be purchased by a General Devereux of Marblehead, MA (his son was the model for the drummer boy) and installed in Abbot Hall in Marblehead in 1880 where it remains on display to this day:

    Marblehead's "The Spirit of 76" Painting | Marblehead MA

    It would become known as "The Spirit of "76". It was extensively reproduced over the years in prints and there was even an animated version in a cartoon with Pork Pig!

    Well, during his lifetime, Willard would paint smaller versions given to family members and dignitaries up until at least the 1890's. These have been labeled as "original copies" and they can be quite valuable (one selling for > $ 1,000, 000). Willard often varied the backgrounds from the "original" version he painted.

    Well, in a group shop, I came across this:

    spirit of '76 1.JPG spirit of '76 2.JPG

    A pretty well done late 19th century oil on canvas of the "Spirit of '76". Note the trees in the background of this one. It came from an old estate in Marblehead, MA. Little likelihood of being one of those "original copies" by Willard himself as it is good, but not good enough. However, a nice folky effort that I'm pleased to own.

    I had brought it to a recent antique show and that lead to a rather interesting conversation with Archibald's descendants who came to the show. Alas, they didn't buy it.

    Finally, Go Patriots, stomp KC!!

    RM
     
  14. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    RM, funny you should mention these movements. I just started work on one of mine this AM. It is the wagon spring version, precedes yours by a year or maybe less. They seem to have used the solid iron/plated wheels fairly indiscriminately in these movements. Sometimes several of them are the iron based wheels, seldom but from time to time all the wheels will be brass. It is also interesting as you mention the gut stringing. The gut in my clock is nearly perfect. According to the repair dates it was replaced in 1933 on one side and the other in 1940. Also, one of my two of these clocks has a roller verge, and an iron escape wheel. The wheels are a bit rusty in one movement but not the other.

    Then there are the tin plate movements that immediately followed your movement. This one has all iron/tin plated wheels except for the one great wheel. Ever get the feel they were making it up as they went along? Or sweeping up the floor and making clocks with what ever they found?

    I am not certain about the glass in my clock, hard to believe it is correct, but still it has been there a long time.

    20190119_171844.jpg 20190119_171911.jpg 20190119_171952.jpg View attachment 513402 20190110_204124.jpg 20190110_204136.jpg 20190115_112002 (2).jpg 6466_B.jpg 20190119_172201.jpg
     
  15. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for your contribution to this thread.

    Not sure about your glass either. Certainly not one of the variants I have seen. Then again, appears to have some age. A picture of the back would be appreciated.

    I think over time these guys were slamming together stuff that was around and kinda worked. For example, based upon my research of the literature, no 2 Atkins and Whiting "cottage" clocks are quite the same with a bit of a mishmash of square toothed and standard toothed wheels. Makes clocks of this period by these makers all that more interesting! Love it.

    RM
     
  16. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Just to clarify, I assume you realize that your label is for the Atkins Clock Co., which succeeded the Atkins Clock Mfr. Co. and was formed in 1859. See Atkins & King, p. 54, figs. 211, 211a, & 211b. The early history of the Atkins Clock Co. is some what a tortured read, but an interesting glimpse into the goings on of Irenus Atkins.

    Just FWIW, this door glass is shown on the Gilbert Gem from the 1875 catalogue (see Tran's Gilbert, p. 306, fig. 1068. See below.
    Gilbert Gem.JPG
     
  17. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Thanks, Steven for the illustration of the Gilbert with the glass like mine. I think we can now assume it is wrong in my clock since my Atkins and the Gilbert are separated by 20 or 25 years, at least.
     
  18. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I took those pix a few weeks ago & I should have re-reviewed them! I guess I got the wrong company name in my head. Sorry!

    RM
     
  19. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #219 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jun 11, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
    To summarize a bit.

    Chauncey Jerome, in the 1850's, +/-, produced wall timepieces and clocks with cases and movements that are very English in appearance. The movements have integral fusee movements. They are pictured in his 1850's trade catalog (more like a broadside; see Chris Bailey's wonderful monograph on Jerome for more info). For more about this type of clock, see examples I've posted on this thread.

    Some 20 plus years later, the New Haven Clock Co. produced shelf clocks with integral fusee movements. This was NOT an instance of just using up left over movements from the 1850's. These were different movements with shorter movement plates and escape bridge characteristics typical of movements produced in the 1870's. They were placed in beehive, peak topped and "kitchen" clock cases. Why? Who the heck knows. They were made in rather few numbers and are rather scarce.

    I've posted a beehive and peaked top example previously on this thread. See posting # 40 for an example of a beehive. Here's a teaser picture:

    img_1971-jpg.jpg

    This posting has links to good references about these scarce clocks. Check it out.

    I've also posted an example of the peaked case example. See posting # 80. Here's a teaser pic:

    img_3637-jpg.jpg

    By the way, the "Answer Box" published incorrect info about these movements. See my (ignored) response posting # 193,

    There was another model in this scarce series. It was called the Oxus. Basically an Eastlake "kitchen" clock with the latest form of this movement. It has proven, to me at least, to be the most elusive to find.

    Basically a glorious fragment surfaced in the April, 2007 ROSFA auction, lot 308a. The replaced base was SO wrong. The crest ornaments were replaced as well. Not surprising as they were attached with small inadequate single brads. The same clock would resurface on peebay in 2009 as "all original". What BS. Nope. Had a replaced base. I almost bought it until I realized in was the glorious fragment from the ROSFA auction heavily restored. I've had a Jones for that clock, the Oxus, hoping to complete my acquisition of there entire series.

    Well, at my fave NE MA flea market on a misty lousy AM, I recently stumble upon this:

    oxus 3.JPG

    Be still my heart. The Oxus! ALL elements of the case, including finish, COMPLETELY original. No refinishing. Just did a gentle cleaning.

    Here's a pic of the movement:

    oxus 5.JPG

    This is the proper later movement. Note the escapement bridge and the shorter plates. This particular one has an out board alarm. For a virtually identical arrangement, see my favorite Bulletin Supplement #9:

    https://nawcc.org/images/stories/publications/PubSupplementsPDFs/sup_9_41.pdf

    See page 44, figure 33. By the way, on the same page are shown the earlier Jerome integral fusee movements.

    I was thrilled. I have completed the series! Here they all are together:

    oxus 2.jpg

    Well, I feel the urge to be superfluous.

    The same day, I found, IMCO, this wonderful chromolithographed advertisement:

    cw parker 1.JPG

    C.W. Parker was the only carousel maker not on the east cost. Their carousels were made to be mobile. In fact, there is a museum devoted to C.W. Parker carousels in Leavenworth, KS. See the website. I hoped to save this for my Antiques Week show. Well, I was made an offer I couldn't refuse...went to a new home.

    RM
     
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  20. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    man, your posts make me happy.
     
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  21. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks buddy.

    I'm glad that you find them interesting.

    RM
     
  22. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    we should have a 'posts by RM' forum featuring your more in depth posts (but not the ones beating up on my fellow moderators! :))
     
  23. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    p.s.: please find that humorous!
     
  24. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for your kind comments!

    RM
     
  25. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    For those of you who have been paying attention over the years, you’ll know that I collect almost nothing unless it has a connection to Chauncey Jerome. Some might argue that it’s an unnecessarily limiting approach to collecting, because there are so many other interesting makers to explore. Perhaps that realization was the impetus for the subject of this post, a clock purchased at the River Cities Regional earlier this year. It may be closer to the truth to say that it was a bargain I couldn’t afford to pass up. Either that, or it was my wife saying “I think we need to buy it!”

    The clock is an 8-day, double fusee, time & strike, double candlestick clock made by M.W. Atkins. Merritt Atkins was involved in a number of companies, among them Atkins & Porter (c. 1840-1846), M.W. Atkins (c. 1846-1850), and M.W. Atkins & Co. (c. 1850-1856). The type 7.1 movement is a product of the Atkins firm. Beyond listing the name of the firm as "M.W. Atkins", the simple label offers no clues as to period of manufacture, because there’s no printer’s line. However, the firm name is enough to date it to 1846-1850.

    It's referred to as a double candlestick because of the tapered pillars on either side of the steeple body. What’s unusual (I understand from others) is that this one has balls mounted on top of two of the candlesticks. From glue residue, it appears all four candlesticks had balls. Ones I’ve seen in books or on the internet (most of which were made by Birge & Fuller) have not had balls. Did they originally, and they’ve simply been lost over the years? These clocks all (?) came with ball or bun feet. Those are clearly missing on mine. However, there are mounting holes for feet in the base.

    Going off on a tangent, the double candlestick might be regarded as a variant of the steeple-on-steeple. I’ve actually seen double candlesticks referred to as steeple-on-steeples, but I think they’re different enough to deserve their own name. The similarities are that in both there’s a rectangular lower box on which is mounted a taller and narrower box with a peaked top. The steeple-on-steeple, however, has finials mounted on plinths on both the lower box and upper box. The double candlestick (there’s also a single candlestick variant) has a pair of long, tapered finials mounted on plinths on the lower box.

    The tablets, which I believe to be original, are typical of those found in other double candlesticks, whether made by Atkins or Birge & Fuller. There’s been some discussion on the message board about the maker of the tablets [see the Fenn thread, post #54 and following]. Often you’ll see one of these free-hand, geometric tablets paired with a Fenn stenciled tablet, which leads some to believe (count me among them) that they were made by Fenn’s shop. One thing that swayed me towards that viewpoint is that the color palate in paired free-hand & stenciled tablets is often identical. Is this likely if supplied by different shops?

    Bringing this back around to Jerome, during the period this clock was made, Jerome wasn’t really making anything that directly competed (stylistically) with the double candlestick. The closest would have been Jerome’s oversized steeples, but I think everyone would agree that the double candlestick elevates the steeple concept to another level entirely. While I’ve always been struck by the fact that Jerome rarely passed up an opportunity to exploit a niche (high-end clocks being the biggest exception), for some reason he left this niche to other, much smaller firms.

    By the way, as close-knit (even incestuous) as the CT clock-making community was, I can’t find any connection between Atkins and Jerome.

    Mike
    190622-1a.JPG 190622-2.JPG 190622-3.JPG
     
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  26. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Regards the feet on these style clocks, their original intention for the feet IMO was to allow the use of the lower wagon spring support bracket. The following photo shows the bracket on an earlier wagon spring (non-steeple on steeple case) as well as the turned feet on a couple of the traditional steeple on steeple clocks. The feet seemingly continued after wagon spring-powered clock production ceased, as they continued with fusee power and later some were produced with simple spring driven movements, still using the steeple on steeple cases. Sometimes with feet on the case, sometimes not. I have seen a couple of cases drilled for feet that appeared to have never had feet. (no glue traces, no differing oxidation where a foot might have existed originally)

    987658_view 07_07.jpg IMG_1389.JPG
     
  27. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Mike,

    That is one heck of a wonderful clock!!

    Beautiful glasses! I guess I am a convert to the belief that Fenn made both types.

    If you have access, King and Gregory discuss MW Atkins on pages 34-40. The weight driven version of the movement in your clock is shown in figure 160a. They describe it as "rare". Note the "feet" to extend the movement so as to accommodate the gears. The use in your clock is an example of basically a conversion from weight to spring by employing a fusee.

    A 4 candlestick model like yours is shown on page 35, figure 162. The authors also describe it as "rare". They date it to circa 1851. It has the fusees in a wood block like yours.

    Your point about the ball tops on the candlesticks is interesting. The candlesticks on the example illustrated look like the 2 posterior ones on you clock. Makes you consider if, as you suggest, they had them originally.

    RE: the feet. Like Jim says. The example in King and Gregory has rather puny ones which make me wonder if they were original. As mentioned, because of the use of the fusees in a block rather than a wagon spring, the feet from a functional standpoint were unnecessary and thus an unnecessary expense? So even though the case may have the mounting holes and some certainly have feet, I would look closely to see whether they were ever installed. It's possible they weren't.

    Jerome was smart to leave the higher end to others. For example, the Atkins firms made some rather different and high quality stuff that practically and economically made no sense for their time. This occurred to me when I examined the Parlor model which I recently posted. In an age when clock companies were already producing simpler cases and movements that served their purpose well, Atkins Clock Mfg Co made this clock with a rather complex case (see my discussion for my basis for saying this) with an albeit interesting but unnecessarily complex movement and motive force. It's also why some of Atkins firms struggled and didn't last long. However, considering some of the stuff Jerome made (e.g., a 4 day oversized steeple, a gallery clock that required the owner to remove the dial to fully access and adjust the pendulum bob, his "upside-down" spring movements that had some basic design flaws like as the springs unwound, they fouled the gears, just to name a few), he was not a paragon of practicality.

    Anyhow, great clock! Thanks for sharing. I hope your foray outside of the Jerome Universe wasn't too unnerving o_O

    RM
     
  28. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    Jim and RM,

    Thanks for your thoughts on the Atkins clock. I've looked more closely at the base, and I don't see evidence in the form of differential oxidation or residual glue that would point to the clock originally having feet. I also appreciate the observation that feet were a necessity on the ones powered by a wagon spring. If not needed from a functional standpoint, then it becomes a matter of cost vs. aesthetics.

    My library is apparently incomplete, and, yes, even in the age of the internet, it's apparently still necessary to maintain a library. I don't have a copy of Gregory & King's Irenus Atkins book. I'll need to keep an eye out for it.

    I don't know that I'll make acquiring non-Jeromes a routine occurrence. I'm afraid that could prove to be a very slippery slope. However, this experience certainly wouldn't deter me from venturing further afield.

    Mike
     
  29. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I can only encourage your delinquency.

    RM
     
  30. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Atkins was indeed spending a lot of money building clocks in a fashion that was expensive but didn't provide additional benefits to the buyer. A classic example would be the massive 30 day time only wagon spring clock mechanisms. By the time these clocks / timepieces were built good American conventional springs had been available for perhaps 10 years. The cost of the castings, the intermediate wheels, and the spring assembly itself had to exceed the cost of conventional springs several fold. Atkins put these mechanisms in all sorts of cases, some of them quite mundane (London model cases for example). He also put these mechanisms in some outrageous gilt cases as well as gallery clocks, so called school clocks, etc. I can see the gilt cases could well justify a premium price and perhaps return a profit to Atkins. The London models? Not so much.
     
  31. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Agreed.

    I would even suggest that even some of his plainer looking cases were economically unfeasible. For example, as pointed out in my thread about the wagon spring “Parlor” model, that case is constructed of multiple small panels & parts. Compare that to your then popular steeple, cottage or ogee. And you don’t even get a useable mirror or colorful tablet in the bargain!

    RM
     
  32. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    A bit of an oversight. I just realized I never posted a pic of the label:

    oxus 6.JPG

    It's relatively small and located on the lower outer back board. Typical of NH labels of the period.

    RM
     
  33. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thought I would post another fusee shelf clock and use it to belabor some of my pet peeves.

    It's a form I haven't been able to acquire until recently.

    boardman and wells.JPG

    The case is pine with mahogany veneer and only about 20 inches tall.

    The dial surround is original and is not stenciled but appears to be hand pained:

    boardman and well.JPG

    The wooden dial is original but was repainted by the Dial House. Here's the back of the dial:

    boardman and wells 2.JPG

    Note the repair dates.

    The repaint is done well but for my taste, too white and I'm not crazy about the faux crazing. Done by the finest professionals but IMCO, unless the dial was totally trashed, I would NOT have had it repainted. Heresy.

    The tablet is a signed Moberg done to his typical high standard. Now I do not know what was there originally. The current tablet may reflect then one originally there. However, I wonder if it had a different tablet?

    Here's the movement:

    boardman and wells 3.JPG boardman and wells 4.JPG

    A typical Boardman and Wells 30 hour fusee time and strike movement I have posted previously in other clocks by this maker.

    The label is interesting:

    boardman and wells 5.JPG

    Note the overpasted label. D. Baldwin who was a furniture maker whom I found in mid-19 Century NYC directories. I guess he sold clocks, too, to complement his general line of furniture..

    Pet peeves? Restoration of the dial and tablet by the finest craftspeople. But I'm not sure they're correct restorations. Furthermore, the dial is rather harshly white with faux crazing. Not sure the tablet was correct.. All in all, this clock may be an example of restoration done at some expense by the finest craftspeople but not entirely accurately. Think about how something is restored before enthusiastically diving in.

    Need to be superfluous.

    The Gods O' Picking have been generous. What to select?

    Okay, a few things then.

    Here's a rare example of late 19th early 20th century Judeo-American folk art (oh no, religion; might be deleted by a twitchy moderator!!):

    mizrah.jpg

    Jews were obligated to pray facing Jerusalem, the site of the Temple of Solomon. This is an embroidered on punched cardboard "mizrah". It would indicate the direction of prayer. Quite scarce.

    How about a sweet splayed leg CHILD sized Sheraton 1 draw side table:

    child sized 1 draw table.JPG

    Only 24 inches in heightl and wonderfully proportioned.

    Okay, I'll end with, IMCO, a wonderful folk art trade sign (lousy picture; sorry):

    car sign 1.JPG

    Sorry, lousy picture of a great carved and painted automobile trade sign. Note the basket of fruit in the front seat with traces of polychrome paint and the "MM" . It's white pine so no doubt American. Many cars made in the US were left hand drive prior to 1908. That's when Henry Ford began making the model T with right hand drive which would become the standard. I believe the sign depicts the Morse, a left-handed drive car made in Easton, MA:

    morse auto.jpg

    Looks awfully similar. Note the steering wheel. Thoughts appreciated.

    RM
     
  34. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    I may have posted this clock elsewhere on this board. It's a Chauncey Boardman, Bristol Conn. I especially liked the glass..... as well as the fusee.

    boardman1.jpg boardman2.jpg boardman3.jpg boardman4.jpg boardman5.jpg boardman6.jpg boardman7.jpg
     
  35. senhalls

    senhalls Registered User

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    Would the above glass be attributable to William Fenn ? It's very beautiful with such detail and condition.
     
  36. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Fenn? I posted the glass in the Fenn Glass thread a while back and no one challenged it. I've assumed it to be a Fenn glass.

    Ralph
     
  37. senhalls

    senhalls Registered User

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    Thank you for the reply.
     
  38. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for posting your great and beautiful Boardman fusee steeple! It's the 8 day version (so many are 30 hour).

    A while ago on this thread, I posted a Boardman 8 day fusee in a "beehive" case with a cut and frosted tablet. See posting # 99 on this thread. Here's a "teaser" pic:

    img_4243-jpg.jpg

    I also posted another 8 day (labeled Boardman and Wells) in a case originally intended to have a JA Ives SPRING driven ww movement! Guess those went over like a lead balloon so some one had to do something with the left over cases. See posting 147. Again, a teaser pic:

    img_5779-jpg.jpg

    Note lack of brass caps on the fusee.

    Boardman and Wells are listed as users of Fenn tablets in Linda Burleigh's article.

    Yours is a free hand painted one rather than largely stenciled. It is certainly Fenn-like. I'm not sure it's a Fenn. That said, I have clearly Fenn stenciled tablets that have original free hand embellishment. Furthermore, I've come around to the opinion that Fenn did do free hand glasses, specifically the amazing free-hand geometric ones:

    img_2944-jpg.jpg

    It is not unusual to find these free-hand tablets in the same clock with a Fenn stenciled one, often with the same color palate. That is the instance with this clock (also on the fusee thread).
    SO, may be it is a Fenn. Whatever we call it, call it beautiful.

    RM
     
  39. 124Spider

    124Spider Registered User
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    Hamilton Model 21 Marine Chronometer from World War II.

    It's beautiful, accurate and reliable, and it helped win the war (really and truly).
    BothTopsOpen-6807.small.jpg
     
  40. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks.

    It's very nice!

    RM
     
  41. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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  42. 124Spider

    124Spider Registered User
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    I'll take a look, thanks!
     
  43. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Thank you RM, for the informative response and the posting of your 8 day beehive.

    Regards, Ralph
     
  44. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    You're welcome and thank you for your interest.

    RM
     
  45. Bill K

    Bill K Registered User

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    I am in need of information and advice concerning a Smith and Goodrich “cigar box” fusee. At some point in the recent past the works and gong were ripped out and replaced by plastic junk, battery works. I won’t go into the morality of this horological crime, all the worse because it was supposedly done by a “professional” clock repair individual. Very sad. The case, though sensitively refinished, is in perfect condition and the glass is all original. The reverse painted tablet has only minor flaking around the borders. The label (bearing the shadows of the missing double fusees) is clear and intact (Job Power Press, Elihu Geer, No. 10 State St., Hartford). The zinc face is also in original, decent shape. The case is 15” T, 8.75” W and 3.75 D. The winding holes are 3 5/16” on center at 21 and 39. From researching S&G clocks on-line it appears that a double fusee works, patent 4914 of Jan. 1847 might be what I need. These are 30 hr, spring powered brass works with wooden fusee cones in an iron frame attached to the bottom of the plates. They seem to be standard in most of S&G’s smaller clocks in the late 1840’s. Is this correct? Is there a common name to identify these specific works? “Standard S&G, small case, 30 hr., double fusee” maybe? Once properly identified, what would be the best way to locate a set of these works? Fusee works are few and far between in my neck of the woods and this obviously isn’t something you can just pick up on e-bay or Craig’s List. I can do basic works repairs so I don’t care if they are in running condition as long as everything is there and (hopefully) with the gong. My aim is not resale, my modest collection of mainly Antebellum, wood cased, American shelf clocks would welcome this little fusee S&G and bringing it back to life would soothe my historical outrage. Any comments and/or assistance would be greatly appreciated!

    DSC_0032 cropped.jpg DSC_0033 cropped.jpg
     
  46. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #246 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Aug 8, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2019
    How very tragic indeed for so many reasons! I cannot fathom the thought process, if any, that might have occurred in the course of that vandalism unless it was already an empty case.

    That is not a particularly common case style. That it has good veneer on those somewhat tight round bands around the perimeter is a plus. Because short pieces of veneer were required to make a somewhat tight curve, it often is damaged. Nice label, too.

    What an absolutely WONDERFUL William Fenn glass!! There's more about him on the MB, too.

    The dial looks right. Any evidence of a signature as they were often signed by S&G. It might be rather faint so look carefully.

    I would agree with your statements about the now lost movement. An additional tragedy if it was just discarded. They certainly aren't growing on trees. I'm not aware that there is any standard nomenclature for them but what you suggest is pretty good! They are found in a variety of S&G small shelf clocks. Please peruse this thread and you will find pictured a number of small S&G shelf clocks, their works and labels.

    Here are some teaser pix of what you will find (general pic of clock followed by its movement; in some cases I did not take a pic of the movement as it was basically the same as in previously posted clocks):

    img_1867-jpg.jpg img_1871-jpg.jpg
    img_1874-jpg.jpg
    img_2028-jpg.jpg img_2025-jpg.jpg
    img_2933-jpg.jpg
    img_6130-jpg.jpg

    Just to throw the proverbial monkey wrench into the works, here's a S&G standard sized steeple with the fusees mounted in a wood block rather than a cast iron frame with the cords going over wooden pullies in the eaves of the case! Rarely seen probably reflecting the lack of any apparent benefit of this arrangement:

    img_5531-jpg.jpg img_5526-jpg.jpg

    Another exception is the very first clock I posted on this thread. A S&G cottage with an 8 day fusee time only movement. Very scarce. So do look around this thread.

    Be patient. Scour Craig's list, eBay, auctions (e.g., Schmitt and Horan sells "box lots" of movements; some real goodies turn up there), etc. You might have to be willing to buy a junker to get it. I think there is a wanted forum here on the MB, too. Might try that? Consider becoming a member of the NAWCC. It would give you access to local Chapter meetings where you might find someone who has that movement plus many other benefits. One huge benefit is on-line access to the Bulletin and 3/4 of a century of horological knowledge and the ability to search it on-line, too. Much about this firm in those pages.

    I so very much applaud your passion and effort. Yes, it would be a wonderful addition to any collection of American Antebellum Period clocks! Plus, it's beautiful.

    Good luck and please let us know how things turn out. I'm hopeful we'll see a complete clock some day!

    RM.
     
  47. Bill K

    Bill K Registered User

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    Thank you very much for the information and recommendations. Yes, I probably should join the NAWCC, I have hesitated in the past since my elderly clock mentor was a member and freely shared his experience. He was still working on clocks at 95 but has sadly left us, taking more knowledge with him than I'll ever accumulate. I believe that I will take your advice and become a member. I thought that the tablet was a "Fenn" but was not going to possibly show my ignorance as a new member in an open forum, I'll save that for later. I see no S&G markings on the dial but it does appear original. The veneer impressed me too. My wife and I collect, among too many other things, American Empire furniture so historically accurate veneer repair has become a frequent requirement in my shop. Even with a vacuum bag, sharp radii veneering would try the patience of Job. Cyma curve clock cases are the worst and mine always need something, maybe because I'm attracted to ones which are victims of abuse or neglect. Bringing them back is much of the fun. Reliable estate sale hearsay says that my gutted "cigar box" S&G had been taken to a "repair" shop by the old couple and were told it wasn't "fixable" and had the battery works slapped in. When approached later by family members the "repair man" said he'd discarded them as junk but the strong suspicion is that he sold them for profit. Such actions are inexcusable in any profession. We do not own our antique possessions, we are just temporary caretakers with the cultural responsibility to pass them on in the condition (or better) that we received them. We, even as non-professionals, have a code of ethics to uphold. Sorry, didn't mean to get on a "soapbox!" I will post a search on NAWCC for my missing S&G works and comb everywhere else, there has to be an orphan set of proper works out there somewhere in need of a home. Thank you for the pictures, you have some real beauties in your collection. You've worked hard and been very fortunate to put such an assortment together! Thank you again for sharing your knowledge!
     
  48. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    You're most welcome and thanks for your kind comments.

    You were quite fortunate to have a mentor. I can speak from personal experience how important that can be. In my case, for teaching me not about repairs but about opening my eyes to early 19th century American clocks and their history. Guides my collecting to this day. Sadly, how few nascent collectors today have such an advantage?

    I hope you don't mind that I've highlighted a portion of your reply for emphasis.

    Good luck in your search. Let us know how it turns out.

    RM
     
  49. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Just a quick update.

    With a certain frequency I will just pluck a book or Bulletin off the shelf. I choose a portion to read or even just look at pictures. Often I'm not looking for anything in particular. But I do stumble upon interesting things now and then.

    Well, recently I chose "Forestville Clockmakers" by Roberts and Taylor. Well, I found this very clock on page 24, figures 21A-21C. When included in that publication, the dial hadn't been restored. Now, I don't know if the dial had deteriorated further, but if it were in the same condition, I would have not had it restored. Based upon the publication date of the book, the tablet is at least 30 years old?

    RM
     
  50. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    I showed these little ogees in a previous post and promised some better shot of them. So, here we go. Two are Smith & Goodrich, the other is a William Johnson. All are 30 hr double fusee clocks. And all appear to be just about 100% original save a bit of overzealous cleaning of the original finish. That, and I don't like the Maltese hands on the one clock, but they fit and could be original. The glasses are original, the dials are original, the labels are all good but the green one is hard to read and harder to photograph. The glasses are pretty much a tour de' force of the lower continuum of clocks of the period. I suspect others may see the work of William Fenn in them? In any event, it is pretty unusual to find this condition in 3 clocks all at the same time and place. They obviously came from a collector who liked the best! And the 4th clock is my wife's favorite. It is 8-day, fusee, one of my creations of 40 years ago. It has the time side of a Forrestville movement. It has been shown on the MB before.

    IMG_3375.JPG IMG_3369.JPG IMG_3366.JPG IMG_3365.JPG IMG_3356.JPG IMG_3362.JPG IMG_3363.JPG IMG_3346 (2).jpg IMG_3349.JPG IMG_3352.JPG IMG_3355.JPG IMG_3376 (2).JPG IMG_3381.JPG
     

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