Bulle Post Your Bulle-Clocks Here

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by John Hubby, May 7, 2002.

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  1. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Bule irratic at best

    The Bulle clock was designed to operate on the voltage of one single dry cell, one and a half volts.

    Eratic rate and or gathering extra teeth of the ratchet is a fault of excess pendulum motion. The motion of the pendulum is seriously affected by the battery voltage which varies both with temperature and of course the age of the dry cell. Both variables are overcome by the compensation spring adjustment. Many Bulle clocks have lost the spring. It's made of very fine steel wire and requires steady fingers and keen eyesight to replace.
     
  2. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Bule irratic at best

    I will confirm Les' comments regarding sensitivity to voltage, and that these clocks will operate properly on 1.5 volts.

    Skipping teeth on the contrate, or gathering more than one at a time, is not a question of voltage, however. It is entirely due to the position of the pendulum contact pin in relation to the "Y" contact yoke on the movement. The correct position is for that pin to be set so that the diameter of the pin is exactly at the "shoulders" of the "Y" contact slot. At this position, even if you manually swing the pendulum all the way to either side, the drive pawl will only pick up one tooth at a time. You may have to make some small adjustment up or down depending on wear on the "Y" contact. I am attaching a sketch to show the correct position.

    Regarding timing of the Bulles, it is VERY important that the isochronous spring be correctly tensioned. If this is missing you will NOT be able to adjust the rate of the clock. Replacements are now available from Peter Smith in the UK.

    To adjust the rating, first set the rating nut at the bottom of the pendulum at a mid-position. Set the isochronous spring so it will be "just" slack at the center position of the pendulum. Start the clock. More than likely the clock will run slow at this adjustment. If so, gradually tighten the tension of the isochronous spring by lowering the clamp on the front pendulum rod. Continue to make adjustments until the clock is running within 30 seconds per hour. At that position you can then use the rating nut to make a fine adjustment. Keep in mind that one full turn of the rating nut will only give you 2 minutes per DAY of adjustment.

    Hope this will help.

    John Hubby dba Pas-Times
    Vintage & Antique Electric Clocks
    All Types Torsion Pendulum Clocks
     
  3. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Undoubtedly, Hubby's experience with the Bulle battery clock reveals success secrets that come only with experience.

    Obviously, if the silver yoke driving pin is too deep in the yoke slot, the rocking motion will cause the gathering pawl to overtravel and gather more than one tooth of the ratchet wheel.

    The adjustment has to be evaluated anytime the suspension is replaced owing to slight differences in the length of the suspension assembly. And that's probably what has happened with the clock in Clayton's shop.

    Miles' English language translation of "The Bulle Clock" states: "54. By the construction, when the pendulum is at rest, that is to say in vertical position, the silver pin G only enters the nothch of the fork by a distance a little less than its diameter." Further on however, he states: "105. The depth of penetration of the silver pin on the pendulum into the notch of the fork is of very great importance. This penetration has to exceed three quarters of the diameter of the pin." (it seems that there is something lost in the translation about diameters!)

    There's a separate section in the book about adjusting the clicks by rotating the driving block. He states: "125. First one observes only the operation of the driving click. This click when operating normally advances the escape wheel one tooth plus half a tooth for safety."

    One really should have either Miles translation or the original book when undertaking a Bulle clock. (and have a firm understanding of technical French)

    Les Lesovsky in Alhambra, CA
     
  4. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Bule irratic at best

    Another thing to check is that the square ends of the two pawls are centred on the crownwheel teeth. If they are not, maybe the front stop on the fork arbor has been bent or the pins on the pawls are worn, or the holes in the hub that they go into are, causing the occasional tooth to be missed.
     
  5. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Battery Case Interference, Bulle Clockettes

    To all,

    Would like to post some observations regarding the effect of modern steel-cased batteries on the performance of some Bulle Clockettes.

    Early Bulles did not have to be concerned with possible magnetic interference from the batteries since they did not have steel cases, being zinc and cardboard.

    I have found that in the Bulle Clockette models having small cases, especially enclosed with little space in which to place a battery, that the presence of the battery can interfere with the magnetic field generated by the coil and magnet, and cause erratic timekeeping or running.

    If you use two batteries (say two "C" cells in parallel) the problem is worsened especially when the battery pack is located low in the case, perhaps alongside the magnet.

    An experiment was conducted to check this out. A Clockette having a small mahogany case with a back door was used. When the batteries (two "C" cells) were outside the case, the clock ran well with a large swing, good timekeeping, etc. With the batteries inside the case, on either side of the magnet, the pendulum swing reduced by as much as 25%, and timekeeping was affected. Placing the batteries in the top of the case, one on each side, returned operation to normal.

    This experiment was also done independently by another collector who confirmed the result.

    SOLUTION: Place the battery(s) as far away from the magnet as possible, preferably at the top of the case or in the instance of the dome models one on either side of the base. If one battery will work, better yet, place it top center for closed cases or bottom front for the dome models.

    NOTE this does not seem to be a problem with the full size standard models.

    John Hubby, Secretary
    The International 400-Day Clock Chapter #168
     
  6. Analysis of a Bulle Isochron Spring

    Hi Pete,

    It's somewhat mathemetical for most of us (myself included!), but there is a six page article in the NAWCC's, Chapter 161, Horological Science Newletter, 1995-5 (Dec), pages 6 - 12. Including a goodly number of references.
    If you need a copy of the article let me know.

    Still looking forward to you finishing that Bulle restoration on you website.

    Ian
    idp1@verizon.net
     
  7. tickntock1

    tickntock1 Registered User
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    Bulle Clock Coil

    Hello,
    Is there anyone who rewinds the coil on Bulle clocks? I've tested mine with a continuity tester and it shows that there must be a fault somewhere in the windings.
    Any other tips as to what might be wrong with the coil?
    any help is appreciated!
    Thanks, Jim
     
  8. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Bulle Clock Coil

    I don't know of a service to rewind the solenoid or electromagnetic coil found on the Bulle battery clock.

    You indicate that you checked your clock's coil with a continuity checker and determined that there's a fault. For what it's worth, I'd suggest that you re-examine the coil with an ohmmeter. Most agree that the DC resistance of the coil should be about 1200 ohms. Many simple "continuity" testers would indicate an open with resistances greater than more than ten or twenty ohms.
     
  9. swolf

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    Bulle Clock Coil

    Hi Tic&tock, I have a Bulle pedulum in my parts bin. If you can use it email me at swolf369@aol.com .
     
  10. sweede

    sweede Guest

    Bulle Clock Coil

    Hi,
    I had a shorted coil and made a new one from scratch. You can find very thin magnet wire on the web. The spool is just card board construction glued together. I mounted the spool on the unimat lathe and the wire on a holder. The variable speed of the lathe allows for good control while winding. This is very much like your wife's sewing machine filling a new bobbin with thread. In fact that begs the question of using an actual sewing machine to wind a new coil.... Just don't get caught!

    Ken Carlson
     
  11. wheeler

    wheeler Registered User

    Feb 27, 2005
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    Repair of an early Bulle Clock

    I need help! I have a Bulle clock with a clean Y contact and silver pin and a coil measuring around 1160 ohms (so no short in the windings). It can be made to work for a few days and then stops. The magnet seems a little weak but everything else seems to be in order. Can anyone give me a hint of what I should be looking for?
     
  12. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Repair of an early Bulle Clock

    It appears Wheeler, that you are quite certain that the electro-magnetic components of your Bulle clock are without fault. That leaves the mechanical mechanical pieces suspect.

    But first don't overlook a possible weakness in the electrical circuit. The silver spring with the large loop that "rides" on the oscillating fork arbor assures that the fork is at the same potential as the movement frame. Too, the brass tension spring on the front side of the movement that controls the end shake of the fork arbor also contributes to the electrical circuit.

    Normally the Bulle clock will self-start with the slightest vibration of what ever it's sitting on. Usually the pendulum just won't stop until the dry cell is completely exhausted. Even then, owners have observed that their Bulle clock will show signs of "comming back to life" when the weather warms up a dead dry cell after a cold winter.

    So if you're convinced it's not an electrical problem, it leaves only the permanent field magnet suspect. Tips on reforming the Moulin magnet so that it has South poles at each end can be found in this message board using the search feature. The residual strength of the magnet is difficult to evaluate owing to it's odd configuration but usually once re-charged, the magnet maintains it's strength unless dropped on a hard surface.

    Don't overlook the mechanics of the clock. A bit of fuzz between wheel teeth could stop the works. Too, the worm shaft and worm wheel are frictional. The worm wheel must have a little "wink" or slack and not drag on the worm shaft.

    Too, you might try running the movement with the hands motion works removed.
     
  13. cmc

    cmc Guest

    Repair of an early Bulle Clock

    This may be redundant, but from grim experience dealing with these things, the Y contact and its insulation can cause strange effects. My first bulle clock never recovered after my attempts to mend it, but it did teach me this.

    In many cases I have dealt with the problem by cleaning the Y assembly with surgical spirit ultrasonically. (My early attempts, before buying the kit, were with one of those pricey, but effective ultra sonic electric tooth brushes).

    Stuff can get in and around the insulation and the fork which can cause strange effects, especially with such low currents. The fork and the insulation should be utterly clean.

    Otherwise, I can only advise you check every electrical contact and, perhaps, the first few turns of the coil.

    Good luck.
     
  14. wheeler

    wheeler Registered User

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    Repair of an early Bulle Clock

    Thank you to Les and CMC. As a pre-American from across the pond I'm both grateful for and impressed by this amazing NAWCC facility. I've had another look at the mechanical part of the clock and found that the gathering pawl (the smaller of the two) is worn and its carriage was eccentric so the action was completing on one side of the swing. This doesn't explain why the pendulum action is so erratic but I will have a close look at the Y action (which is a little worn at the point where the silver pin diameter intersects the contact). I suspect the loss of magnetism in the armature as the principal culprit and so will try the "SPLODGING" with 22 guage wire and a car battery as recommended. If anyone has any other ideas, I would be very grateful.

    Graeme (Wheeler)
     
  15. wheeler

    wheeler Registered User

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    Repair of an early Bulle Clock

    The "Splodging" worked. As a hint to new users of this technique when winding the coil start at the lower end of the U-shaped Bulle armature (it is possible to then make an anti-clockwise coil) and wind to the middle. Then take a big loop and twist it at the armature end (to hold it in place) and keep winding until you reach the end of the armature. Join both ends together and join that to the negative (-) terminal of a 12 volt battery. Connect the loop to the positive (+) terminal but only by presenting the power to the coil and then removing it (I did this four times). If the battery is in reasonable condition you will get smoke, the coil will jump and heat up so wear goggles, tie the armature to a brick and make sure the area is well ventilated. You then have a magnetised armature with two South Poles (at either end) and a North pole in the middle. The clock works!
     
  16. RickThomes

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    Repair of an early Bulle Clock

    Wheeler,

    I have had to do the "Splodging" to several of my Bulles and have often thought about the loss of the magnetism in the armature. It must be a counter reaction to the electro magnetic field produced at each beat? Any other speculation as to why?
     
  17. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    I doubt that the tiny magnetic field developed in the solenoid of the Bulle clock can, will or does affect the permanence of the field magnet.

    I strongly suspect that the permanence of the odd configuration of the Moulin magnet used in the Bulle clock is more susceptible to loss due to handling. Drop it on a hard surface or strike it sharply and it may suffer loss of definition of the center North pole. High heat will affect the permanence too.

    In my view the Moulin magnet made of then available simple iron alloy is a "natural anomaly" having South poles at the ends. I believe the Bulle field magnet must have a well defined pole in the center for optimal operation. If the pole is broadly distributed about the middle and not well defined, the clock will not have good motion.

    I have demonstrated that a comparatively small diminishing alternating current applied to the "splodging" coil will null the magnet. This compared to the very heavy direct current needed to restructure the magnet.

    The definition of the poles is easily observed with the magnet under a paper dusted with iron filings.

    A Bulle clock with well defined poles will self-start from dead stop within an hour or two in an ordinary domestic setting due to environmental vibration.....this even with an old dry cell!

    JMO Les Lesovsky in Alhambra, CA
     
  18. PeterW

    PeterW Registered User

    Aug 21, 2005
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    Bulle pendulum contact point

    Bulle pendulum contact point

    I have pulled of the shelf a Bulle I have, S/N 190945, that has never run quite right. I have tried most everything that is mentioned in the message boards, and have made some progress. There is still something off though. In order to get the pendulum to swing the silver contact has to be moved up so that the contact hits the yoke at about the middle of the fork. When it is set this way the pendulum swings perfectly. But of course, since the pin is so high, the yoke does not go back and forth enough to move the pawls to make the clock.

    AS the pin is moved lower the pendulum swings are shorter, to the point where the pendulum stops completely when the pin is in the correct spot.

    The magnet was completely demagnetized and I zapped it with a car battery as is described elsewhere here. I have clear S-N-S poles, but I am thinking maybe this is where I went astray. The coil and contacts are obviously fine as the pendulum works. Does anybody have any suggestions or advice?
    Thanks
    Peter
     
  19. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Bulle pendulum contact point

    As I understand the symptoms you've observed with your Bulle battery clock, it would seem that the pendulum has not enough force to operate the gear train when you've optimized adjustments to provide ample motion to the driving pawls.

    Although simple, the wheel-work must be free. I think I'd look for friction between the worm shaft and the worm wheel. As I recall, it is adjustable and some light lubrication on the worm is essential. Too, the thrust plate on the front side of the movement bearing on the rocker arbor is a friction element that has to be considered.
     
  20. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Bulle pendulum contact point

    I agree with Les. In addition, the position of the contact pin on the pendulum relative to the "Y" yoke is extremely important. If it is too high the clock will run weakly if at all, as there isn't enough movement in the yoke and pawl assembly to move the contrate wheel. If it's too low, the pawls may pick up more than one tooth in the contrate wheel and the clock will appear to be running too fast. The "ideal" position is with the centerline diameter of the pin at the centerline of the "shoulders" of the contact and insulator sides of the yoke.

    John Hubby
     
  21. Kevin S

    Kevin S Guest

    Bulle pendulum contact point

    Thanks John, I too was looking for the correct position of the pin in relation to the yoke.
     
  22. PeterW

    PeterW Registered User

    Aug 21, 2005
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    Bulle pendulum contact point

    Thanks to all for the advice. It indeed was friction in the movement. The pendulum now drives the movement with the pin in the correct location.

    Peter
     
  23. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Bulle Compensation Spring Hooking Technique

    How many ways are there to re-connect the pendulum amplitude compensator spring on the Bulle battery clock?

    My most recent experience required nearly a full hour of attempts not counting the time lost recovering it from where ever it's flight took it.

    Once hooked on the upper tubular flopping bracket, I tried grasping the open loop with several different tweezers but they all allowed the spring to rotate, this while the spring was extended with a loop of sewing thread.

    In desparation, I finally succeeded with a sharp-nosed hemostat and with the aid of an awl to position and steady the lower attachment tube. I had the pendulum arrested with a rubber band.

    The procedure requires almost more than two hands can manage.

    What's your procedure?
     
  24. germanlamb28

    germanlamb28 Guest

    bulle hairspring?

    hello, i am hoping that someone can help me on where i can find a hairspring for a bulle clock i am repairing for a friend. Never worked on one in the thirty years repairing. Also where i can find a good book on these clocks.I have been a member of the NAWCC since 1971 but have never used this forum. Can send pics if needed.thanks for any information. TICTOCMAN
     
  25. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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  26. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    bulle hairspring?

    The premier maintenance book on the Bulle Clock is one written by Henry Belmont in the French language. However, an English language translation of the maintenance techniques by Robert Miles is often available. The NAWCC Library may have a lending copy. It is essential for one with no experience in dealing with maintaining weak-current battery clocks.


    Miles translation is good but for me, requires re-reading of some areas owing to the language translation.

    Unfortunately neither the French or English language versions give any hints about repairing or re-making the silk ribbon suspension. On the other hand, John Hubby's instruction for fabricating one is fortunately available.

    As Ralph pointed out, the hair-spring is an electrical connecting path and its spring tension is not a consideration. The original is made of hard-drawn copper but steel can be substituted without harm.

    Often overlooked are two other springs associated with the Bulle clock, the silver spring that has a big loop over the rocking arbor groove and the compensation spring that dampens the pendulum motion. The silver spring looped over the rocking arbor is silver and usually black with sulfide. Clean it if you wish but silver sulfide is an electrical conductor; this spring too is an electrical conducting path and essential.

    Little understood is the small expansion spring that dampens the pendulum motion to compensate for degradation of the dry cell over its general two year life. Without it, regulation to timekeeping is next to impossible. Once removed for maintenance, re-attaching the thin wire spring to the floppy links challenges one's eye-hand coordination!

    The BHI notes on the Bulle clock are helpful but I only conditionally agree about lubrication. The worm wheel and worm shaft reduction to the motion works does, in my view require light lubrication and careful meshing, else the frictional load of the worm shaft and wheel is more than the weak current driving force can handle.

    Once put right, the Bulle clock can only be stopped by disconnecting the dry cell.
     
  27. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    bulle hairspring?

    I needed a new silk suspension when I restored mine.
    I managed to get some 1/4 inch silk ribbon from a market haberdasher for about 10p - enough for about 100 clocks!
    The original chops had been soldered, so I had to clean them all up and tap them 12BA so I could fit countersunk screws from camera scrapbox.
    I also made a jig to clamp everything together with the silk.
    HTH
     
  28. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    bulle hairspring?

    As pointed out, the spring being discussed isn't critical as long as it doesn't bind the movement of the pendulum. I use alarm clock hairsprings from an assortment I bought years ago, those work very well and appear to be virtually the same as the originals.

    I certainly agree with Les regarding the contact spring (the silver one) and the isochronous spring that connects between the pendulum rod and the movement. Les is also correct about how well these things run when properly set up. I've got several that go for 18 months to 2 years on a single "D" cell.

    Both the contact and isochronous springs are now available from Horologix, a Bulle parts specialist that can be found at http://www.horologix.com that Ralph pointed to earlier.

    John Hubby
     
  29. germanlamb28

    germanlamb28 Guest

    Bulle hairspring? thanks

    For my first post on this forum i was far from let down. The link to horologix was perfect.Thanks for the replies they were helpful.Let you know outcome. TickTockMan
     
  30. PeterW

    PeterW Registered User

    Aug 21, 2005
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    Bulle Coil

    I have just gotten a fairly nice small Bulle under a glass dome, but unfortunately the coil is bad. I unwrapped it and it appears that at sometime in the past someone tried to solder the break in the wire. Anyway, does anyone have a source to have the coil rewound or for a replacement?

    Thanks Peter
     
  31. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    #81 Mike Phelan, Feb 21, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2017
    Bulle Coil

    Hi Peter
    It should not be too much of a job to wind it manually - wire is freely available.
    Here
    Even using a hand drill!
    I think someone like John Hubby will come on and give you the wire size and number of turns - the latter is not really critical - just a matter of filling the bobbin.
     
  32. Richard Hatch

    Richard Hatch Registered User
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    Bulle Coil

    Peter:
    Try Peter Smith at Horologix.com he has a great deal of information on these clocks. I'd try there for the coil specifications. Richard
     
  33. RickThomes

    RickThomes Registered User
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    Bulle Coil

    Peter,

    I once rewound a similar Bulle coil by hand and it worked perfectly. I just found similar size wire and carefully made three courses then covered it with green cotton thread for effect. You may want to check the strength of the magnet, as they will lose magnetism over time. Good luck.
     
  34. proconsul

    proconsul Guest

    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    Two questions: What exactly is enameled copper wire and where can it be found? I don't understand the "enamel" part. I have plenty of wire with a plastic jacket. Second, instead of a car battery can a 300 mA AC adaptor from Radio Shack set at 12 volts be used instead?

    Many thanks,
     
  35. Hans Vrolijk

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    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    Steve,
    You really have to use a car battery for re-magnetising because of the heavy current you need.Use thick (mains) wire on your magnetising coil, because you practically short cut the battery. After a few pulses you'll notce the coil to be rather hot!
    Any radio supplier has enamelled copper wire for coils. I think the covering is shellack.
     
  36. proconsul

    proconsul Guest

    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    Thank you Hans. I will check Radio Shack for the wire and use a car battery. Just hope it's not an electrifying experience for me rather than the magnet!
     
  37. swolf

    swolf Registered User
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    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    Steve, I have access to a laboratory magnetizer and have succesfully remagnetized several Bulle magnets. If you want to send yours to me I can turn it around in a day or so. with this machine I can saturate the magnet and confirm that the Guass strenth is correct. No charge of course.

    E mail me at swolf369@aol.com
     
  38. jkfabulos

    jkfabulos Registered User
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    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    I have a very unusual American Clock Co. rotary movement that has been boggled. One of the iron cores has been chopped off. Can anyone help me with a source for the correct material to make a new core and correctly install it? sorry for being slightly off subject. http://static.flickr.com/56/144891784_177b7c812f_o.jp]coils[/url]
     
  39. jkfabulos

    jkfabulos Registered User
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    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    coils
     
  40. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    #90 Mike Phelan, May 11, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2017
    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    JKF
    I've corrected the tags, but your photo is unavailable.
    What shape is the core? It will probably be the same sort of laminated iron that is used for transformers.
     
  41. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    #91 Mike Phelan, May 11, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2017
    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    Enamelled copper wire is used for virtually every coil and transformer ever made. It ranges from 0000 AWG (0.46") to 50 AWG (0.000973") Synchronous clock coils (here) are about 46-46 gauge.

    The enamel was once shellac based, but plastics are used now - the pink stuff is self-fluxing for easy soldering.

    Back to your remagnetising - a 300mA wall wart is no use at all - you need about 50 amps at least! Car battery essential. I used about 40 turns of 26 gauge, but any wire thick enough will do - mains cable, whatever.

    Make sure that the two coils are wound by transposing the ends; i.e if one coil starts clockwise looking at the top end of the magnet, the other end should start antickockwise, otherwise you will have an NS magnet instead of an SNS one with a centre pole.
    HTH
     
  42. proconsul

    proconsul Guest

    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    Hi Mike, Thanks for the direction on how to wind the wire. I would not have known.
     
  43. Bob Pritzker

    Bob Pritzker Registered User

    Jan 20, 2005
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    ATO, BULLE look-alikes

    Hi All
    On a recent trip to a museum Karlstein, in the Czech Republic I was intrigued by two of the clocks on display. Actually, all of the clocks on display but these two held special interest.

    The first was a clock that was identical to a Bulle clock but had a totally different marque on the dial. Does anybody know of another manufacturer of Bulle style clocks and particluarly is anyone familiar with the marque on this dial? It is possibly Eastern European. The clock dial can be seen at:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/clockbutcher/145062696/
    the detail of the marque can be seen at:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/clockbutcher/145062697/

    The second clock has "Dyna" on the dial and is very similar to an ATO clock. There is some type of lamp bulb in front of the dial and the mechanism has a stationary coil and moving magnet (but is very crude. It appears to have an excape wheel like most mechanical clocks as well. Again, is anyone familiar with this manufuacturer or this clock?
    The front of the clock can be viewed at:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/clockbutcher/145062698/
    and the movement can be seen at:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/clockbutcher/145062699/

    I apologize for the quality of the photos as it was difficult to shoot through the domes.

    Thanks for any and all help

    Bob
     
  44. jkfabulos

    jkfabulos Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Aug 21, 2001
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    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    Please see second photo of American "coils" posted. It is not a laminated product.
    Thanks,
    Jim
     
  45. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
    NAWCC Fellow NAWCC Member

    Aug 24, 2000
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    ATO, BULLE look-alikes

    Battery clocks operating on the Bulle and ATO principle are seen occasionally.

    Some resemble the Bulle clock with the moving solenoid and firmly anchored permanent magnet bar. Others such as in your photos, have the opposite arrangement: a firmly planted solenoid with the magnet bar as a part of the pendulum.

    From what others have put in print, it appears to me that both configurations are based on the principles established by Fery, Bulle, Moulon, Hatot and Lavet. All three, and likely other un-named experimenters or developers as well, were contemporaries and obviously shared the results of their experiments to a great extent.

    The Bulle and Hatot (ATO) clocks share electro-magnetics in a dynamic and kinetic environment involving very weak currents; weak current from the dry cell and weak current induced in the circuit dynamically from the motion between the magnet and solenoid. The battery circuit contact closure is precisely timed to occur at the optimum point in the swing of the pendulum so that a minimal battery current maintains the pendulum's oscillation. The electro-dyanmics is a major departure from Hipp's clock.

    Obviously, the Bulle and ATO clock principle was much admired by clockmakers all over the world thus inspiring the creation of similar timepieces.

    The Bulle and ATO and their look-alike mass produced clocks suffer from less-than ideal suspension and battery voltage that varies with age and temperature. Both devised schemes that compensated somewhat for the flaws.
     
  46. Bob Pritzker

    Bob Pritzker Registered User

    Jan 20, 2005
    13
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    ATO, BULLE look-alikes

    Thanks Les
    The first clock does have a moving coil and solid magnet bar while the second is the opposite arrangement. Realizing that there was sharing of information, it seems to me that both the Bulle and ATO were patented and the one that resembles the Bulle was too identical for words. Therfore, itt would still be interesting to have information about the manufacturers of the respective clocks.

    Your comments about the weaknesses of these clocks are very much appreciated.

    Thanks again,

    Bob
     
  47. swolf

    swolf Registered User
    NAWCC Member Sponsor Deceased

    Nov 24, 2002
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    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    JKfab. Is this a dc coil or an ac coil.If its an ac coil the core has to be laminated otherwise the core will overheat. Eddy currents are generated in the core because it acts like a big shorted turn on the transformer . The laminations are insulated from each other by oxide or varnish and this prevents the eddy currents from flowing in the core.

    If its a dc coil the core is probably a very soft iron that will not retain any magnetisim when the coil is deenergized.

    I could machine a piece given the dimension if it is a solid piece of iron. I hAve a lot of this special soft iron material left over from my engineering days.


    You might be able to help me. I picked up a type A movement which i need to complete a SWCC clock. The movement was all apart in a box of parts. One part of the movement, the front plate, of the movement was missing. If you have either a front or back plate in your parts bin perhaps we can do a little bartering

    Sherm.
     
  48. jkfabulos

    jkfabulos Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Aug 21, 2001
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    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    Sherm contact me at jwkrause@verizon.net. I think we can help each other.
     
  49. proconsul

    proconsul Guest

    Re-Magnetizing a Bulle Bar Magnet

    Many thanks for the helpful advice and offers, yet again.
     
  50. proconsul

    proconsul Guest

    Bulle "Crown" Wheel Issue

    While in the process of restoring my Bulle I noticed that the "crown" wheel, i.e. the part with the teeth with which the pawls engage, has a gap of about three teeth. Does anyone know of a fix for this problem? Does anyone have a replacement in their parts bin?

    Thanks,
     

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