Bulle Post Your Bulle-Clocks Here

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by John Hubby, May 7, 2002.

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  1. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Does anyone know where to find replacement isochronous and contact springs for Bulle Clocks? The isochronous is the larger one that fits between the pendulum and the movement, and the contact spring is the small one that rides on the end of the "Y" contact arbor, also connected to the back plate of the movement.

    The originals were made of silver or a silver alloy, I've made some using silver wire but with limited success.

    John Hubby
     
  2. Lincolnhill

    Lincolnhill Registered User
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    Bulle Clock running REAL fast

    Good Evening,

    I just finished restoring my first Bulle clock and it is now running happily.

    However I must say it is running too well as it is gaining 45 minutes or so each hour.

    The problem is that the small prawls that are triggered by the pendulum are gathering two teeth (instead of one) on the small crown wheel the majority of the time.

    Before I try adjusting this or moving that, I assume someone else has experienced this problem before and can guide me directly to the proper adjustment point.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you,

    Michael
     
  3. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Bulle Clock running REAL fast

    Michael, you have found the exact reason why your Bulle is running too fast. Here are some suggestions:

    First check the depth that the pendulum contact pin is resting in the slot in the "Y" contact yoke. If it is too deep (too low) that will cause the pawl arbor to rotate too far on each beat and thus pick up two teeth instead of one. To correct this, simply raise the contact pin until it's diameter sits about level with the upper end of the slot in the contact yoke.

    Secondly . . are you using a 1.5 volt battery? If you are applying more voltage than that, the pendulum will swing too far and will cause the same problem.

    Thirdly . . you need to check the isochronic spring adjustment. Remove the battery, and with the pendulum at rest adjust the isochronic spring so that it is "just" at the point of having some tension in it. If it is too loose, the pendulum will swing too far, if too tight it can cause the pendulum swing to be too small and thus cause the pawl to miss picking up a tooth on the contrate wheel.

    Hope this will help!!

    John Hubby
     
  4. Lincolnhill

    Lincolnhill Registered User
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    Bulle Clock running REAL fast

    Thank you for your suggestions John.

    I will try them today.

    Your thoughts on the pin being too low might be the answer. I lowered the pin a little so that it would make solid contact with the "Y" shaped piece. The clock was not running when I acquired it and part of the reason is that the electrical circuit was not being solidly completed at this junction.

    Is there any other way to aid this contact without lowering the pin? The movement has been cleaned so the poor contact is not due to dirt.

    Thanks again John,

    Michael
     
  5. proconsul

    proconsul Guest

    BULLE LOSING TIME

    Hello,
    I have a Bulle clock which loses about one hour a day. I think it may be due to the way "wires" are connected. Please bear with me; I don't have the correct terms. There is a wire that goes from somewhere near the escapement down to near the pendulum which does not look like the spring on my other Bulle (see fig. 1). Also there is a wire up top near the escapement which looks kind of home made too (see fig. 2). I have adjusted the pendulum as much as I can without it scraping the bar. Any suggestions would be very welcome.
    Thanks to all.
    http://www.deadzoom.com/uploads/UP420855.jpg
    http://www.deadzoom.com/uploads/UP420856.jpg

    Stephen E Marsh
     
  6. Ray Fanchamps

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    You are missing two springs. The first image is a contact spring, part of the circuit to the fork.
    More importantly (since the clock is running) you are missing the ISOCHRONAL spring.
    There are several maladies to make your clock difficult to regulate but until you replace the wire with the correct springs you will not get the clock to regulate regardless of other "problems".
    The missing ISOCHRONAL spring does have the potential to speed up your clock though that is not directly it's function.
    http://www.clocknut.com/nawcc/bullecon.jpg
    http://www.clocknut.com/nawcc/bulleiso.jpg

    Ray Fanchamps
    Candidate for Director NAWCC 2003.
    It's your NAWCC, please vote.
     
  7. proconsul

    proconsul Guest

    BULLE LOSING TIME

    Thanks for the reply Ray. Do you (or anybody else, for that fact) know where I can get the appropriate springs?

    Stephen E Marsh
     
  8. Ray Fanchamps

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    Sorry, I don't have them or a place to get them. They are always missing these parts and spares are like rocking horse droppings.
    One day when I get a chance I will try making some along with Eureka switches and contact pins ,balance wheel springs and long list of other hard to find parts.................

    Ray Fanchamps
    Candidate for Director NAWCC 2003.
    It's your NAWCC, please vote.
     
  9. sweede

    sweede Guest

    Bulle Battery Clock, large style magnet

    I have a Bulle that just will not run very well. The pendulum ocillations seem very weak. I checked my rod magnet and the field is not the same as my other Bulle clocks and does not have the "south poles" at each end with a common "north pole" in the middle. Assuming the fields have been distorted, does anyone know where this can be re-magnetized? Source for a replacement magnet? My 3/8" dia. magnet is approx. 6 1/2" long and bent in a gentle arc about 12" radius.
     
  10. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    The Moulon magnet used in the Bulle clock indeed does have like poles in the middle and at the ends. Test yours by laying a sheet of white paper over the bare magnet, then sprinkle powdered iron over the paper and vibrate the paper. This should reveal the magnetic fields.

    Should you discover the magnet has become corrupted, then remagnetizing it is fairly simple.
    Here's how I did it: Wind enameled copper wire, 22 gauge or larger around the length of the iron bar. Keep the turns close together. You may use as much as twenty feet of wire.

    Make a "center tap" by twisting up a kink in the middle of the winding. Connect together the ends of the winding. (start and finish ends) You may have to use some paper tape to keep the winding secured to the magnet bar.

    Next support the bar magnet and the winding on a brick or some non-flamable material. Connect one terminal of an automobile battery to the ends of the winding, put on safety glasses and with a heavy test lead, momentarily connect the center tap to the other terminal of the car battery. Consult the right and left hand rules of magnetism to get the polarity the way you want.

    The wire winding will get hot real quick so don't maintain the connection longer than ten milliseconds! The winding may jump and spring off the ends of the bar and that's good.

    The technique works and works well but it's not for the faint of heart.

    Les
     
  11. sweede

    sweede Guest

    Bulle Battery Clock, large style magnet

    Les,

    Thank you for taking the time to reply to my question. Your method worked great. My old Bulle has never run so well!!

    Ken
     
  12. timelyrestorations

    timelyrestorations Registered User
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    Bulle clock questions

    A customer has just brought a Bulle clock in for repair. The first I have ever seen "in person"! A couple of quick questions; Are batteries still available? This one has no battery present. The clock mechanism looks fairly delicate, are Bulle clocks difficult to work on? Finally, I see Timesavers has a repair manual for Bulle available. Has anyone had experience with this manual? All comments appreciated.

    Doug
     
  13. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Attempts to maintain the Bulle battery clock without Bob Miles translation of "The Bulle Clock" can only lead to disappointment for the clock repairer and the owner. I strongly suggest that anyone undertaking maintenance of a Bulle clock have, read and understand the book.

    The biggest disappointment in the book and the orignal version in French language is that it completely omits reference to the suspension device which is silk ribbon.

    The Bulle clock is an amazing invention requiring little maintenance but two small springs, one of silver wire and the other perhaps made of elinvar on the finest examples, are often overlooked but vital to acceptable timekeeping. Both springs are made of pure "unobtanium" and aren't generally available.

    The spring made of silver wire has the purpose of assuring electrical continuity to the moving solenoid bob. The other spring, said to compensate for circular error, is the coarse adjustment for rate, the adjustable nut below the pendulum solenoid bob is only a fine adjustment.

    /get the idea? Get the book. ;)

    Les
     
  14. tickntock1

    tickntock1 Registered User
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    Bulle clock questions

    Timesavers now sells the Bulle suspension spring, item20857, page 17 in catalogue#27 - $20 is the charge.

    Does anyone know a source for the two little springs that are mentioned in the above post?
     
  15. proconsul

    proconsul Guest

    Bulle clock questions

    Hi Phil,
    I think you're right on the money. It says something about being made for the Boston division of the Chelsea CC so I bet it is a Hermle.
    Thanks.

    Stephen E Marsh
     
  16. proconsul

    proconsul Guest

    Bulle clock questions

    Hello,
    The last time I inquired about a source for the two small springs everyone seems to need for their Bulles, Ray Fanchamps said he did not know of a source. You might be able to cannibalize what you need from a junker Bulle bought on eBay.

    Stephen E Marsh
     
  17. swolf

    swolf Registered User
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    Att; Ray Fanchamps

    Re; your post regarding springs for Bulle clocks
    I have found a company in CA that can make up Isochronal spring for these clocks. They would be made from 316 SS and would cusom made to our specs.

    What do you think about using 316 SS for the springs, and could you furnish me with the wire size ,OD. length and wether it is wound with pre-tension or spaced windings.

    My email is swolf369@aol,com

    Thanks
     
  18. Ray Fanchamps

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    Hi Sherm,
    I have not done much experimenting with manufacturing these springs. Thus far I have been able to get by with parts purchased over many years. There have been repair notes made on making the spring, I will see if I can find them. The spring has a sensitive role in the timekeeping of these clocks. I will see what I can dig up.

    Ray Fanchamps
    Candidate for Director NAWCC 2003.
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  19. Steve B

    Steve B Registered User
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    Aug 15, 2002
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    BULLE LOSING TIME

    I've found the diameter of the contact and isochronism springs to be .005" and have ordered silver spring material from the UK but it came in .999 silver. Nice stuff but it won't hold the spring shape. I believe the silver is alloyed with another material which allows the contact spring to maintain its springiness. There's 100 meter minimum and at this point I'm not willing to invest more on an experiment. If anyone knows the exact composition of these springs (contact and isochronism) I'd be willing to try again.

    Stevev
     
  20. rodarte3

    rodarte3 Registered User

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    BULLE LOSING TIME

    Hi all
    I have made the springs successfully by harvesting balance wheel swings and rewinding them to the required diameter. They have been running well for some time now and the clocks keep excellent time.
     
  21. swolf

    swolf Registered User
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    Michel, Iwould appreciate a copy of the Bulle spring specifications.
    I think there are a few people who would appreciate this information,so please post it on this site.

    Sherm
     
  22. ged

    ged Registered User

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    BULLE LOSING TIME

    HI, I have a book on Bulle clocks, I bought it in 1998 from Rita Shenton, book seller. It was translated from the original French in 1995. you can make contact at, www.shentonbooks.demon.co.uk
    It is great for fault finding, and if your into Bulle clocks you should have one. I might add I have no connection with this seller. Regards, GED.

    Learner
     
  23. beta21

    beta21 Registered User

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    Hej,
    What would be the proper material of the pendulum suspension "spring" for a Bulle Clock that I'm currently working on. I've tried different isolating materials including silk fabric, but have a problem with the durability of the materials. After a couple of months they all seem to wear through.
    Peter
     
  24. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    The Bulle suspension "spring?" isn't.

    As you wrote, they are cloth. I've had some luck using the silk from a necktie but the best I've made used a strip of Mylar from a floppy disc! Now Timesavers lists them in the catalog.

    Some have opined that the suspension must be an electrical insulator. Examine the circuit closely and I think you'll agree that it doesn't matter.

    The Bulle clock suspension is, by design, not elastic. The "compensation" spring serves to dampen pendulum motion; compensating for variation in the battery voltage. It's the one that's often missing and if present, can callenge one's patience to adjust. It is the coarse rating adjustment. If it's missing, the clock will never keep a constant rate, no matter how much lead get's poured into the fine rating nut!

    Les
     
  25. beta21

    beta21 Registered User

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    Thanks, Les!
    I'll try the floppy disk. Is it the material from the disk proper that's called Mylar?
    Peter
     
  26. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Horolovar makes a replacement suspension.

    ...Les, I would like to see your circuit diagram. A quick look at my Bulle, looks like the suspension should be insulated.

    Cheers, Ralph
     
  27. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    I've been using 1/4-inch wide woven polyester ribbon to rebuild these suspensions for many years. The main advantage of the ribbon is that the edges are finished and there is no tendency to fray whatever. Two pieces are required for the suspension, one either side of the blocks. If you put in only a single piece of material (cloth, plastic, whaterver) you will find the pendulum will tend to wobble and that can affect the running of the clock.

    I certainly agree with Les about the Isochronous spring adjustment. It is critical and not all that easy to bring into time, but once it is adjusted these clocks run very well.

    Regarding the question of the Bulle circuit and the need for insulating material in the suspension, it depends on which model you have. Some have the ground connected to the frame that holds up the suspension, pendulum, etc, and for these there is no need to have an insulator. Others have the ground connected to the back plate of the movement, and on these you definitely need to have the pendulum insulated from the frame.

    John Hubby
     
  28. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    John,

    Thanks for the clarification..

    Ralph
     
  29. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    The responses to "beta21's" query regarding repair of the cloth suspension used with Bulle clocks has piqued my curiosity.

    I agree fully with Hubby that certain models of Bulle clocks and those made by others under license may require an insulated suspension. However, my experience and the illustrated references I have, all reveal a conductive spiral or other jumper bypassing the insulated cloth suspension.

    I wonder why the inventor discarded the "time-tested" elastic steel suspension in favor of the non-elastic silk?

    Which styles of Bulle clocks specifically require an electrically insulating suspension and have no need for the bypass jumper?

    Les
     
  30. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Hi Les,

    On my large model of the Bulle, the conductive spiral spring connecting to the main pendulum rod, has it's other end connected to an insulated terminal going to one end of the power source.

    The second part of the circuit is made by the lever horn/fork contacting the insulated (from the pendulum rod)contact, but electrically connected to a rod running down the length of the pendulum rod and connecting to the other end of the coil of the electromagnet.

    The lever horn/fork is connected through a coil spring to the frame of the clock, which is connected to the other end of the power source.

    Ralph
     
  31. Dick Bailey

    Dick Bailey Registered User

    Nov 19, 2002
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    Bulle clock

    My Bulle clock has stopped and my current diognosis is that the contact surface on the fork, for the switching, is worn and does not make good contact with the pin on the pendulum rod. This is based on using a VOM. The batteries are good. Any suggestions?

    Thanks.

    Dick Bailey
     
  32. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Hello Bailey. Your Bulle clock stopped? Incredible beyond belief!

    'Seems like they run for ever on a single cell and always drain the last micro-ampere of energy out of even the oldest dry cell.

    Actually, wear of the contact area of the fork is not uncommon. However with two that came to my attention that appeared to have contact failure of the fork, didn't! Close examination of the mating silver contact pin on the pendulum revealed a deep slice well into the silver.

    Certainly the proper procedure would involve replacing the silver contact pin but by rotating the pin through 90 degrees set the clocks running again.

    Take a close look at the contact pin. It should be smooth.

    Les
     
  33. Dick Bailey

    Dick Bailey Registered User

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    Bulle clock

    Thank you Les for the reply and comments. Yes, the pin does have a groove on the under side. The question now is, how does one rotates it 90 degrees? I tried doing that with pliers but with no results. Fortunately I did no harm except for some plier tooth marks on the out end of the pin. Evidently the pin is in its collar quite tightly. I shudder at the thought of removing the pendulum rod to get at the pin assembly. I noted on first examining the pin-fork area that the pin is bent slightly down as though a previous owner had encountered the same problem. I need guidance and moral support. :)

    Dick
     
  34. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    The silver contact pin on the Bulle clock is threaded into the collet/holder part of the pendulum. Presumably a right hand thread. I recall it's tight and will hold it's postion after rotating.

    It is unfortunate that yours appears to be bent.
    However, silver and most alloys of silver are very malleable and it should straighten easily.

    Good luck.

    Les
     
  35. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Hi Dick
    Yes, it is a right hand thread, and there is no need to bend it to engage the fork correctly - just slacken the clamp screw and slide it up or down. It should engage the fork by half its diameter. If it is bent out of the horizontal, the depth will be indeterminate.
    Any Bulle should build up to a healthy swing in a minute when nearly stopped - arc < 1 degree

    Keep ticking
    Mike
     
  36. Dick Bailey

    Dick Bailey Registered User

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    Les and Mike,
    Thank you for the excellent information. I am lucky I did not twist off the pin when I first tried to turn it as I am sure I was going the wrong direction. It turned easily when I went counter-clockwise. The slight bend in the pin was no problem as the clock runs fine with only the rotation of the pin. I now know a little more about the Bulle clock thanks to the both of you. This message board in amazing. I send a question form Ohio and promptly get good information from California and England! Just the MB is worth the cost of membership, even though one does not have to be a member to use it.

    Dick
     
  37. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Thank you for your kind comments about our ability to help you with the Bulle battery clock.

    Much of what I have learned is from experience but guided by Bob Miles' English language translation of the French language version of the Bulle clock book. A small and inexpensive book that every Bulle clock owner should have.

    Again, thanks for your complement about the assistance you gained using this NAWCC Message board facility. We enjoy sharing our knowledge.

    Les
     
  38. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Hi folks
    I am in the process of restoring a Bulle clockette, ca 1937.
    I would like to know what the original battery looked like - those I have seen before were flat with screw terminals, but this clock has an arm with a half-hoop of brass soldered to it; this is screwed to the underside of the base, and looks as if it would hold a C-size cell in position. There are also 2 right-angled brass brackets held on with 2 of the 3 column retaining nuts, and the leads terminate in a 2-pin plug like those used in this era for LT radio batteries.
    Does anyone know how much of this is original?
    My intention is to use a C-size alkaline cell in a holder, or a C-size 2v lead-acid with AM-P connectors.
    Mike

    Keep ticking
    Mike
     
  39. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    The Bulle clock movement, like the ATO was exported to some extent and found it's way into many odd case configurations. Just about any one and a half volt zinc-carbon or le Clanche cell would do.

    However, a glance in Belmont's "La Bulle-Clock," there is a photo of no less than nine different cells (Piles) used in the French made Bulle clocks. Two are cylindrical, much larger than today's "D" flashlight cell and four rectangular cells with binding posts. Two other varities have lugs on the ends apparently used in the four-glass clocks which have latches to connect to the lugs extending from the rectangular shaped cell.

    I would strongly recommend against using a two volt lead acid cell; even those "gel cells" with immobilized electrolyte.

    The well adjusted Bulle clock will function for years on a "C" or "D" flashlight cell, well beyond the shelf life of the cell.

    Les
     
  40. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Mike, if you could provide the serial number on your clock movement I can give you the date of manufacture to within plus/minus a couple of months. The serial number will be stamped into the back plate on the left hand side.

    Also, could you send a pic by email to pastimes@juno.com or post it here? That will help add to the info I am compiling on these clocks.

    John Hubby dba Pas-Times
    Vintage Battery Electric Clocks
    All Types Torsion Clocks
     
  41. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Thanks, Les and John, for your input.

    Les
    Is your objection to a 2v lead acid cell because of the leakage risk, or just because of the higher voltage? I have come across Bulles that have been running on 3 volts for years, with no apparent damage.
    My main reason for wanting to use one of these, rather than a C-size alkaline or zinc chloride is that I would not need a holder to make the connection neatly - the lead-acid cells I have are high-quality Cyclon (USA) ones ex life-critical medical equipment. The recess in the base is only deep enough for a 'C'
    I probably did not phrase my question very well - what I really need to know is if the arm and two brass pieces are original; if they are, I will retain them.
    John
    Serial number is 257575, which, according to Martin Ridout's site, puts it at around 1937. A more accurate dating would be most welcome, thanks.
    At the moment, the clock is partially dismantled - would you like pictures of it as is, or would you want some when I have completed it? (about 3-4 weeks) or both?
    It is a fairly standard clockette - mahogany base and glass dome (I am having difficulty locating correct size in UK) 125 x 200 mm.

    Keep ticking
    Mike
     
  42. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User
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    Mike. The issue of the "Cyclon" cell is, in my opinion, twofold. One, the principal issue is against suggesting the use of any lead-acid cell or Gel Cell. I am aware of the careful construction of the Cyclon cell and their reliability. However, too often the message is not clear and well intended users may be inclined to use a motor-cycle lead acid battery. Thus I have to flatly reject suggesting that any other than the intended zinc-carbon "Pile" or le Clanche cell be used.

    Additionally, the cell voltage of the Cyclon, at 2.2 volts nominal, while only slightly in excess of the zinc-carbon cell may tend to suggest that higher voltage batteries is acceptable for the Bulle clock.

    Of course, the owner may use what ever he wishes but I cannot in good faith, suggest any other than the maker's one-point-five volt zinc carbon cell for the Bulle clock. Although we all know that they do not, no matter how well constructed, will eventually decompose, often causing severe damage to metal parts.

    Additionally, the use of a higher voltage for the Bulle clock would tend to make the clock difficult to regulate owing to the wider pendulum arc caused by the higher-than-design voltage. This would require an extreme adjustment of the isochronus correcting spring if the clock is to have a decent rate.

    I am aware that many Bulle clock users have found their clock runs well on a 3 volt battery but fails on a single cell. This can only mean that the clock has a wear or adjustment problem that is masked by the higher source voltage.

    While any risk of damage to the Bulle clock operated using a 3 volt battery is minimal, again to suggest using a higher than design voltage may be mis-interpreted by a well meaning user that might be temped to use a six or nine volt battery and that would likely cause erosion of the fork contact area and the silver contact pin.

    Enough of my opinion!

    Les
     
  43. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Mike, thanks for the serial number info. By my research, that clock would have been made in 3rd quarter 1930. I checked Martin's site and could not find a dating table on Bulles, maybe I'm looking in the wrong place? http://www.mridout.freeserve.co.uk/index.htm#moving%20coil. The one example shown on his site (a Clockette that probably is very much like the one you are working on) has serial number 295552, which he mentions is ca. 1934, my research shows early 1932. If he has something more on dating I would like to see it.

    Regarding the pics, I can wait until you have it up and running.

    As far as batteries are concerned I have to side with Les that only dry cells should be used, or a variable voltage power supply. When I find a clock that someone is running on 3v (or more), generally a good cleaning and adjustment will set it to running fine with 1.5v, usually to the amazement of the owner.

    However: There are also some caveats that go with this.

    1) The magnet must be in good condition. I use a Gauss meter to check, if the reading is less than 20 Gauss at any pole position on the magnet I will remagnetize it before going further. A weak magnet will require higher voltage to run.

    2) The coil resistance should be 1200 ohms (all models). I have rarely found one with more, but fairly frequently will find one with less (maybe one in 20). The lower resistance could be from the coil being rewound by someone not knowing the correct resistance, or it can be the result of a short circuit within the coil that shunts current around a section of the windings. Either one gives the same result, a weak swing.

    There are only two remedies for low coil resistance: Rewind it, or raise the voltage. You can roughly approximate the voltage required to get a normal swing by this quick calculation:
    Divide normal resistance by actual resistance, square that result, and multiply by 1.5. For example, a coil with 1000 ohms requires 1.2(squared) X 1.5 = 2.16v to run normally.

    OK, then what do you do? You can put in two batteries to give 3v, but as Les says you must also adjust the isochronous spring to compensate, and on the Clockettes there may not be enough adjusting length on the pendulum to do the job. You can also decrease the impulse by slightly raising the contact pin on the pendulum, to reduce the length of time it is touching the contact point on the yoke. A combination of doing this and adjusting the isochronous spring "can" get you in the ball park, problem is that the wear on the contact pin and yoke will be enough that this fix may not last more than several months.

    My preference to solve this is to put a resistor in the circuit to reduce the voltage to the required level. Easy to do, resistors are cheap and available at Radio Shack or any commercial electronics shop. You can calculate the resistance needed based on actual coil resistance and applied voltage needed using Ohm's Law (E=IR). In the above example, the current through the 1000 ohm coil will be 0.00216 amps at 2.16v. To reduce 3v to 2.16, a resistor of 388 ohms is required at the same current flow. I would put in a smaller one, probably 350 ohms, to compensate for the battery discharge in time.

    Hope this will help anyone working with these clocks.

    John Hubby dba Pas-Times
    Vintage Battery Electric Clocks
    All Types Torsion Clocks
     
  44. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

    Dec 17, 2003
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    Hi Les and John
    This is turning into a very interesting discussion!

    Les
    Thank you for explaining your stance on batteries - I will probably go the 1.5v route if I can devise a way of providing a means of connecting it that does not destroy any originality. Will measure OD of a C-cell holder to see if it will fit in recess under base, or maybe use 2 x AA in parallel.

    John
    D'oh - sorry - it wasn't Martin's site, it was:
    http://www.bhi.co.uk/hints/bulle1.htm
    Interesting that this comes up with a much later year.
    I don't have a gauss meter, but the last Bulle I did had been 'got at'; the magnet had a North pole at one end and a South at the other!
    Wrapped some 22g EC wire around each limb and splodged it across a car battery - OK. Centre pole was fairly central. How do you remagnetise them?
    I did remagnetise a car magneto once by wrapping magnet with a few dozen turns, and connecting to mains through a 13a fuse - do not try this at home The theory being that the fuse would blow on a current peak - it worked. I have also conneced every electrolytic I can lay hands on in parallel and charged the lot to 50v or so!

    Coil is 1.2k, so insulation is OK. I would rewind it if it was lower, as IMHO only a few shorted turns would affect things more than the proportional drop in resistance. (Electronics background in previous life!)
    Radio Shack in UK disappeared a few years ago - we have Maplins, RS, Farnell and CPC.
    And my scrapbox!
    Do you still want pictures, John? Semi-dismantled or when I have finished it?

    Keep ticking
    Mike
     
  45. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Hi Mike . .

    Oops!! That's my page on the BHI site . . and sadly out of date. I need to send them an update ASAP so the "right stuff" can be shown.

    I remagnetize same as you do using a 12v auto battery. I've put together some coils that fit each type of magnet so they can be reused. I like your term "splodged", that's kinda what I do but not directly on the battery terminal as that chews up the lead. I use jumper cables and put a piece of wire in the "open" one and then zap it to the disconnected end of the coils. Found with some testing that it takes three "zaps" to be sure you are at max strength.

    Non-destructive battery holders: Here's a trick I've found very useful. I buy a two cell holder for "C" size batteries, rewire it to put the two in parallel, and then use stick-on velcro to attach the holder to the clock underside. This does no damage to anything, allows you to take out the holder whenever you want, and it holds very well in place. Of course, if you only have space for one cell, no problem as the idea still works just fine.

    Re the pictures, I'll wait until you have it back together and running.

    John Hubby dba Pas-Times
    Vintage Battery Electric Clocks
    All Types Torsion Clocks
     
  46. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Hi John
    I must pay more attention! Your velcro idea sounds good - I'll see how deep the recess in the base is when I have removed it from the chuck of my Myford. Don't worry, I am not doing anything drastic - I find that the ML7 in backgear is the best way to apply French Polish to round objects.
    I may have to remagnetise this one - it is a bit on the weak side. Time I made a couple of permanent coils for the job.

    Keep ticking
    Mike
     
  47. John Hubby

    John Hubby Principal Administrator
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    Large Bulle-Clock Glass Domes

    Anyone needing one of the large glass domes for the full size Bulle clocks may want to check this out: http://link.toolbot.com/cgi.ebay.com/1480

    They will be a bit costly by the time they get to the U.S. but are almost impossible to find otherwise. Usual disclaimer, I have no financial or personal interest in these.

    John Hubby, Secretary
    The International 400-Day Clock Chapter #168
     
  48. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Large Bulle-Clock Glass Domes

    Pity he doesn't have any smaller ones for clockettes - 125 x 200 mm :frown:
    Apparently the ones he is selling are surplus from a batch he had made for several Bulle clocks that he had
     
  49. tickntock1

    tickntock1 Registered User
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    Bulle Clock Springs!

    Finally a source for the scarce and often missing springs (contact and isochronic) for Bulle electric clocks!

    www.horologix.com
     
  50. beta21

    beta21 Registered User

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    Bulle Clock Springs!

    Thanxxx for sharing!
     

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