Possible source of quartz rod for use in regulator pendulums

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by doc_fields, Feb 22, 2013.

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  1. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

    Sep 29, 2004
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  2. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    Sounds like the way to go. It is tubing but that shouldn't be an
    issue. Looks to be cheaper than invar as well.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  3. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

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    What I like about it is that it is hollow. I noticed on David Walters' fine double-pendulum regulator that he apparently used a hollow quartz tube for his pendulum, and inserted or slipped the upper and lower assemblies into/onto the tube. The only possible method of bonding the upper and lower assembly would be through some form of glue or adhesive that would bond metal and glass (quartz in this case).

    Here is a link to an article about his regulator, and look closely at the second picture down of the upper assembly as it is fastened to the quartz tube. http://tempered-online.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=3393

    I do not know how fragile quartz can be, but my link in the first post shows some quartz tubing that is designed for a compression fitting. Hmmmm. I will probably make a call on Monday to talk to these people about this tubing......................doc
     
  4. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

    Oct 11, 2010
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    Quartz can be drilled and cut with a diamond
    bit or saw. You don't need to glue.
    A dremal and a diamond bit can make a hole for
    a pin.
    Quartz is quite tough ( hard is a better word ) but
    I would say less brittle than normal glass.
    It is not easily scored and broken like normal
    glass. It is better cut with a diamond wheel.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  5. tok-tokkie

    tok-tokkie Registered User

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    That is very interesting. They offer fused quartz rods in diameters from 1mm to 40mm in small progression of sizes.
    The compression fittings would be the standard pneumatics fittings usually used on copper and stainless steel tubing (also nylon tubing with a small metal sleeve on the inside). But drilling and grooving with diamond wheels is possible as is adhesive bonding.
     
  6. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Thank you for the link doc! I'll probably be calling them in the near future with a few concerns I have regarding the 30 pound bob I have on my regulator.

    Because of my interest in quartz I asked Mr. Walter at last year's National how he bonded the metal to the quartz. He said he talked with someone from Loctite and he was given a recommendation of a two part adhesive which is what he used. He didn't remember the specifics offhand, but that shouldn't be too hard to find if anyone is interested.

    Just passing this along.

    :thumb:
     
  7. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

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    Jim;
    Well, back home from the Midwest snow! I did email David Walter, and he told me the same thing, except exactly what it was. The upper and lower parts were Invar, and glued with a 2-part glue from Loctite. That's my plan. Will write more later..................doc
     

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