Polishing compounds for steel pallets

Phil G4SPZ

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Oct 18, 2018
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I have just replaced a steel strip pallet and saddle on an old Welch movement. Having no diamantine (the traditional polishing compound) I used Peek, a mild metal polish recommended by the Museum where I work as a volunteer. The polishing, hardening and re-polishing processes took a while but the end result is pleasing.

Would diamantine have been any quicker or better? I have access to several other metal polishes, including Autosol and Greygate No 5, so I don’t want to buy other products if they will offer no benefit.

Many thanks! Comments and experiences appreciated.

Phil
 

shutterbug

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I use wet/dry emery paper. The fine grit leaves things polished nicely while the heavy grit is good for shaping and removing faults.
 

disciple_dan

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Mar 10, 2016
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I use an Escapement file to remove wear and then polish it with 1,500, 2,000, 2,500 then 3,000 all in the direction of travel.
 
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Schatznut

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Sep 26, 2020
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I use plain old car polish on a felt buffing wheel in my Dremel tool. It's a very mild abrasive that leaves a high shine.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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First, you don't need anything special, or expensive.

I use fine abrasive papers (usually 400 to 800 automotive) on a backer, as already mentioned, followed by a quick hit on the ole muslin buff turning at 3450 RPM. The buff is charged with Tripoli.

Willie X
 

Altashot

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Oct 12, 2017
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Sand paper glued on popcycle sticks.
I have various grits.
Sometimes, if there are deep ruts, I start with 320 then work my way up.
I have grits as follows. 320, 400, 600, 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000, 12000.
By the time I’m at 12000, the pallets, or whatever else, are like mirrors.

I find that buffing wheels tend to round edges if you’re not careful.

M.
 

Phil G4SPZ

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Oct 18, 2018
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Thanks, all. Never thought about using wet & dry papers. I have a selection of fine grades, so I’ll try that next time to remove the deeper marks prior to polishing.

Cor, 12,000 grade wet & dry paper must be something else! The finest I have is 2,500 grade. Perhaps the finer stuff is akin to what used to be called “crocus paper”.

Phil
 

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