Pocket watch info

davy

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Dec 3, 2010
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Hi, I have been left this watch in my late fathers estate and I would like some information as to its origin and value please.
There is no name on the face or in the plates of the watch. The only markings are what looks to be a hallmark of a crown or a W and K18. Then numbers 7813 on both the case lids. The watch works fine but the little loop at the winder is missing.
I have enclosed some pictures.
View attachment 4055
View attachment 4056
View attachment 4057
 

Surf Monkey

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Jan 6, 2010
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Appraisals are forbidden here, so we can't give you information on values. That movement sure looks Swiss to me. Interesting case, though...
 

Jim Haney

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Davy,

I moved your inquiry post to this section for a better result on your questions. Swiss ebauche's (raw movement) did not usually have serial numbers and no factory records were kept, so it is hard to date and tell you who made the watch.

If it is in it's original case(?) more information my be obtained by hallmarks stamped inside the case, as to, who made it etc.

It is pin set (that button on the top edge of the case by the crown) is depressed while turning the crown to set the hands. They were generally in use about 1885-1900.

From your comments it may be 18 K Gold and I would suggest you have it tested of checked to verify this.
 
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davy

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Dec 3, 2010
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Thanks guys for your help. I'm from Scotland and came across this sight through a Google search. I was wondering how you changed the time on it but now you've told me how that's great. I will probably take it to an auction house to see if they can tell me of its metal type and valuation.
Cheers
Davy
 

Oldfathertime

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Sep 8, 2010
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Davy. Nice plain white enamel dial and as said looks like a Swiss movement, probably dates from between 1910 and the 1920's. Look in the back hinged cover and see if there are any impressed stamps in it, if not then it will be a base metal case gold plated, normally the plating thickness on these are 10 microns. The K18 would be the case maker which would probably be Kay's and the 18 would be the case style. The number 7183 would be the serial number of the case and being stamped on both parts would tell the chap in the factory who put the case together that he had the correct parts that matched. I see also that the ring on the winder stem is missing, cheap to have replaced. If you take it to an auction house for valuation, don't be too dissapointed with their figure and if you include it in one of their sales don't forget that out of what it makes you'll have to pay the sellers commission which will be up to 15% + VAT.
 
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Cary Hurt

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Dec 16, 2005
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Davy.

Your watch is definitely Swiss and it is most likely 18 karat gold (although some Swiss watches are known to overstate the gold content). The "K18" is the continental (particularly German and Russian) manner of denoting the gold content. The crown that you mention is likely the German hallmark for solid gold.

Your movement is a cylinder escapement, and appears to be a product of the maker Adolf Schild, although there were several other makers producing similar designs. It appears to be an 8 jewel movement, which would be upper middle in quality, functionally equivalent to a 15 jewel lever escapement watch. These were much more common in continental European use than in the UK or the US. They also stayed in vogue a bit longer, so although I believe Jim is correct in his date range for your watch, it could be as late as 1910 or so.

Cylinder escapements were among the first successfully mass produced movements, and were considered to make up in durability the little that they gave up in accuracy. They were surpassed in quality by the lever movements, and once the mass-production of levers became more common, cylinders were relegated to the second-tier. They would be largely considered obsolete by the 1920s, and few modern watchmakers are versed in their repair. There is also a distinct shortage of spares available, so repair is often problematic and expensive. Since you report that yours is running, consider that a plus, although you should have it checked by a watchmaker when you find someone to replace the bow.

As an heirloom, this is quite a nice watch, and you should be proud to carry it. As a collectible, cylinders are not as highly sought as some other designs, so much of the value will be in the gold value of the case.
 

MartyR

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Dec 16, 2008
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Unless it's a trick of the light, the plate covering the mainspring wheel (at the top left of your photo, Davy) looks like a later addition. It has a certain "Longines" look, but I'm not suggesting this is a Longines movement.
 

eluchansky

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Nov 30, 2010
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davy;511412 said:
Thanks guys for your help. I'm from Scotland and came across this sight through a Google search. I was wondering how you changed the time on it but now you've told me how that's great. I will probably take it to an auction house to see if they can tell me of its metal type and valuation.
Cheers
Davy
Davy - The photos are of great quality. What kind of camera did you use?

Gene
 

davy

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Dec 3, 2010
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Howwood, Scotland
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The camera I used is a Samsung Digimax S800 in macro mode. Its a great camera. I've had it for about 3 years now.
 

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Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff