Plugging the winding holes on an ogee dial

tliette

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Does anyone know how or what to use to plug the winding holes on an ogee dial? Would epoxy putty work? I have 2 ogee clocks that don't have original dials. I would like to put period dials back on them, not the knock off dials that are all the same in design. I like to keep my clocks as original as possible.
Thanks,
Ted
 

bruce linde

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i'm confused... if you're putting period dials on them, the dial holes don't line up?

sure, yes, you could use all sorts of things to plug the holes... but you'd have to match surfaces, and then colors... and then they're not really 'as original as possible'.

maybe you could post some photos of what you're trying to accomplish?
 

tliette

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Bruce,
That's the drawback to plugging holes in a dial, I don't have the talent to match up the paint so I'd have to send it to a restorer. I've had 3 dials done by the Dial House in Ga. and I've been really pleased. But I haven't tried to plug any holes yet I was just wondering if there was a standard product or method that others have used.
 

tliette

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Well to be honest I hope I don't have to, but sometimes the measurements don't add up or someone else can't read a tape measure. If I want to stay with the proper period dial to get what I want I may have to plug and then re drill the holes at the proper places. But then I'd have to have the dial's paint touched up or restored. Depending on the current condition of the dial.
 

bangster

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I'm sure epoxy putty would work to plug he holes. But it would need to be sanded smooth, which might mess up the dial.
 

Uhralt

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I would probably make wooden plugs and use either a spackling compound or wood putty to smoothen things out.

Uhralt
 

brian fisher

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I know of “a guy who knows a guy” with a great big storage tub of about a hundred+ period shelf clock dials. I bet if he is interested in selling a couple, he will either chime in here or shoot you a pm.
 

Uhralt

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assuming the dials are wood and not tin.

I think it best to just find the correct period dial to be honest.
Yes, I was assuming a wooden dial and also a situation where no good fit could be found.
Uhralt
 

Coalbuster

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If you're talking about the "tinny" metal dials typical on ogee clocks, and I wanted to cover a errant winding hole, I would buy two replacement dials and use a quality hole punch to cut a hole out of one of the dials. I'd then paint the thin edge to match, and it probably only has to be "in-the-ballpark," and paste that plug over the hole in the other dial. I'd try that before trying to plug a hole in a dial.
 

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