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Please Show the Most Recent Addition to Your Collection

DTSPatrick

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Last found in the mailbox:
Circa 1795 Thomas Parker, Watch & Clockmaker in Philadelphia, PA, a verge fusee, 3 jewel, presumably an English-made import, American signed movement. SN86 with matching dust-cap serial number. KWKS verge escapement, diamond endstone, gilt movement.

50mm silver OF pair cases, the inner bearing London hallmarks for 1763, the outer bearing London hallmarks for 1770 and containing a case paper for Caleb Baker of Bordentown, N.J.

View attachment 679660 View attachment 679661 View attachment 679662 View attachment 679658 View attachment 679659 View attachment 679663 View attachment 679664

Thomas Parker (1761-1833) was a descendant of English Quakers who settled in Philadelphia in 1684. He was trained by David Rittenhouse and John Wood in clock and watch making. He began business around 1783 at 13 S. 3rd. St., just after the Revolution in the first days of the New Nation era. His clocks are better known and documented. He was master to Benjamin Ferris, Wilmington, DE, (1780-1867) who sold a clock to Thomas Jefferson in 1803.

From 1814-1830 Parker served as the President of the Mechanic's Bank. He also was responsible for the care and maintenance of the State House clock. He supplied the chronometer to the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804), which at $250 was the single most expensive item purchased for the expedition.

Although the watch was running and in relatively good shape after 225 years, it did have the expected well worn pivots and corresponding oval bushings, which were closed slightly to make them less so. The hairspring was not centered and that was fixed to have concentric, evenly spaced coils.

The biggest issue was a link was found to be cracked, likely due to the frozen cone pawl that was addressed. The repair was to tap out the pin, remove one link, clean up the mating links, fabricate a new pin and reassemble. I found this to be fascinating, as the width of the link at its largest point is only 0.65mm, or about 7 sheets of standard copy paper! I put those images below.
View attachment 679666 View attachment 679668 View attachment 679665 View attachment 679669 View attachment 679670 View attachment 679671 View attachment 679676 View attachment 679673 View attachment 679674 View attachment 679675 View attachment 679677 View attachment 679672 View attachment 679678 View attachment 679667

Reassembled, timed, disassembled, adjusted, repeat as need. Finishing touches performed of fabricating a new bow pin, replacing a wrong hour hand with one that matched the others and bluing all the hardware.

When it arrived, I ran it face up and it gained about 2 minutes initially, returning to zero deviation at 12 hours, and loss of a minute at 16 hours. Wound, set and hung pendant up where is lost about 30 seconds in the first 8 hours and was minus 3 minutes at 12 hours. Repeated these runs and got similar results so there is high confidence this is the level it is at, which from what I read is excellent for a verge fusee.

I was, and am, only going to own one of these and having one with ties to Philadelphia, which is a short ride from me, and from the period of time of shortly after the Revolutionary War (I live a few miles from the Sept 11, 1777 Battle of Brandywine, the largest and longest battle of the war; more troops fought at Brandywine than any other battle of the American Revolution) this was going to be the one. I am more than ecstatic with how well it turned out and deeply appreciative of the time, effort and skill of Eric Unselt to make it look and work as good as it does, and provide this level of documentation. "It is pretty wild that a mechanical device built around Geo. Washington's unanimous vote for the presidency is still capable of coordinating a day in the life of corporate America in 2021."
Amazing looking watch and an impressive repair.
 

Greg Frauenhoff

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I picked up this Waltham (low hanging fruit?) because of the dial (also silver case and appearing to be in unmonkied with original condition). Similar dials appear on '92 model mvts but I couldn't recall seeing one on a 6 size. The dial looks to be "oversized" but I have checked yet to be sure. Given the mvt size one would assume it is a ladies watch, but an inscription on the dust cover shows it was given to a son. So I'd call it a boy's watch. Does anyone have any period (1890s) info on Walthams marketed as boy's watches?


img867.jpg
 

musicguy

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and the movement


Rob
 

Girl59

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Oct 31, 2021
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Here is my latest addition. I needed one to replace a movement I sold many years ago. It is a model 1888 21 jewel Riverside Maximus NON-MAGNETIC open face in a nice 14K case. View attachment 664139 View attachment 664137 View attachment 664137 View attachment 664138
Maximus Man, Just beautiful. I'm brand new here and trying to get a feel for what interests different members. The movement is lovely to look at. And great-looking case. Congratulations on a new member of your watch family!
 

Girl59

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Oct 31, 2021
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Last found in the mailbox:
Circa 1795 Thomas Parker, Watch & Clockmaker in Philadelphia, PA, a verge fusee, 3 jewel, presumably an English-made import, American signed movement. SN86 with matching dust-cap serial number. KWKS verge escapement, diamond endstone, gilt movement.

50mm silver OF pair cases, the inner bearing London hallmarks for 1763, the outer bearing London hallmarks for 1770 and containing a case paper for Caleb Baker of Bordentown, N.J.

View attachment 679660 View attachment 679661 View attachment 679662 View attachment 679658 View attachment 679659 View attachment 679663 View attachment 679664

Thomas Parker (1761-1833) was a descendant of English Quakers who settled in Philadelphia in 1684. He was trained by David Rittenhouse and John Wood in clock and watch making. He began business around 1783 at 13 S. 3rd. St., just after the Revolution in the first days of the New Nation era. His clocks are better known and documented. He was master to Benjamin Ferris, Wilmington, DE, (1780-1867) who sold a clock to Thomas Jefferson in 1803.

From 1814-1830 Parker served as the President of the Mechanic's Bank. He also was responsible for the care and maintenance of the State House clock. He supplied the chronometer to the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804), which at $250 was the single most expensive item purchased for the expedition.

Although the watch was running and in relatively good shape after 225 years, it did have the expected well worn pivots and corresponding oval bushings, which were closed slightly to make them less so. The hairspring was not centered and that was fixed to have concentric, evenly spaced coils.

The biggest issue was a link was found to be cracked, likely due to the frozen cone pawl that was addressed. The repair was to tap out the pin, remove one link, clean up the mating links, fabricate a new pin and reassemble. I found this to be fascinating, as the width of the link at its largest point is only 0.65mm, or about 7 sheets of standard copy paper! I put those images below.
View attachment 679666 View attachment 679668 View attachment 679665 View attachment 679669 View attachment 679670 View attachment 679671 View attachment 679676 View attachment 679673 View attachment 679674 View attachment 679675 View attachment 679677 View attachment 679672 View attachment 679678 View attachment 679667

Reassembled, timed, disassembled, adjusted, repeat as need. Finishing touches performed of fabricating a new bow pin, replacing a wrong hour hand with one that matched the others and bluing all the hardware.

When it arrived, I ran it face up and it gained about 2 minutes initially, returning to zero deviation at 12 hours, and loss of a minute at 16 hours. Wound, set and hung pendant up where is lost about 30 seconds in the first 8 hours and was minus 3 minutes at 12 hours. Repeated these runs and got similar results so there is high confidence this is the level it is at, which from what I read is excellent for a verge fusee.

I was, and am, only going to own one of these and having one with ties to Philadelphia, which is a short ride from me, and from the period of time of shortly after the Revolutionary War (I live a few miles from the Sept 11, 1777 Battle of Brandywine, the largest and longest battle of the war; more troops fought at Brandywine than any other battle of the American Revolution) this was going to be the one. I am more than ecstatic with how well it turned out and deeply appreciative of the time, effort and skill of Eric Unselt to make it look and work as good as it does, and provide this level of documentation. "It is pretty wild that a mechanical device built around Geo. Washington's unanimous vote for the presidency is still capable of coordinating a day in the life of corporate America in 2021."
This is amazing, Joe. What a thrill. Congratulations!
 

DTSPatrick

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Jul 9, 2020
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I picked up this Waltham (low hanging fruit?) because of the dial (also silver case and appearing to be in unmonkied with original condition). Similar dials appear on '92 model mvts but I couldn't recall seeing one on a 6 size. The dial looks to be "oversized" but I have checked yet to be sure. Given the mvt size one would assume it is a ladies watch, but an inscription on the dust cover shows it was given to a son. So I'd call it a boy's watch. Does anyone have any period (1890s) info on Walthams marketed as boy's watches?


View attachment 679712
I was eyeing that dial too — almost pulled the trigger but got cold feet. Glad it went to a good home.
 
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Girl59

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I was eyeing that dial too — almost pulled the trigger but got cold feet. Glad it went to a good home.
In my very short life as an American pocket watch admirer, I've never seen this dial type before.
 

DTSPatrick

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That has some of the nicest damaskeening I have seen on any of these '91 Maximus! Most are a little simpler.
I’m rarely taken back by the beauty of a movement when opened up for the first time — camera tricks and good angles usually make movements look much better than they really are. However, this movement really surprised me how crisp and even more beautiful it looked in person. Once again, very happy with his watch.
 

richiec

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Picked up two watches and a compass at the Mid-East Regional and a Smith's marine clock at a Chapter 25 mart in the last 3 weeks. The Smith's clock was serviced 3 years ago, the compass is a Brinton millenium Mark V, the Waltham is a 16-17 jewel Model 1888 in a really nice GF case, I bought the 7 jewel Elgin because of the case, an unusual oblong GF case. All run well, the Smith's is deadly accurate, just missing the tail off of the seconds hand.

IMG_8144.JPG IMG_8145.JPG IMG_8146.JPG IMG_8147.JPG IMG_8148.JPG IMG_8149.JPG IMG_8150.JPG IMG_8151.JPG
 

musicguy

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Very nice haul!

Rob
 

richiec

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Thanks, Rob. Great time finding it all and buying it. I had never been to a regional since I've been a member since 2008, what a great experience. Need more money next time.
 
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musicguy

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Very nice, a fine looking movement.


Rob
 
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Ethan Lipsig

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I've been trying to add watches to my collection, but with relatively little success lately because the prices of the solid gold or platinum high-grade watches I collect are escalating beyond my willingness to pay. See https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/are-pocket-watch-prices-increasing.183477/.

My bidding hasn't been completely ineffectual. I recently acquired a lot of two Walthams at a Skinner auction. I normally do not bid on multi-watch lots, but I really wanted to acquire one of the Walthams in this lot, so I had to acquire the other, which is a nice 18k Dubois-cased Model 1899 lever-set 23j Vanguard. I don't collect RR watches, so I am not sure I will keep this watch, but it is a nice one.

DSC08166.JPG DSC08167.JPG DSC08169.JPG DSC08178.JPG

What I bought this lot for was the other Waltham, a 14k Riverside A with a spectacular case. The case is marked Waltham but I would love to know which firm actually made it. I am also curious if the Riverside A movement is unusual because it does not state the number of positions to which it has been adjusted. Almost all my other Riverside As state that they were adjusted to 5 positions.

DSC08181.JPG DSC08182.JPG DSC08184.JPG DSC08188.JPG DSC08192.JPG
 

Jerry Treiman

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What I bought this lot for was the other Waltham, a 14k Riverside A with a spectacular case. The case is marked Waltham but I would love to know which firm actually made it. I am also curious if the Riverside A movement is unusual because it does not state the number of positions to which it has been adjusted.
That really is a special case. I have only seen one other American watch case with this more European style of scenic engraving. (My example, below, has a case # only 25 from yours). I suspect these cases were from Depollier. Your movement happens to be the last movement of the first production run, and almost all of the early Colonial-A movements, with serial numbers in the 18-millions, seem to lack adjustment notations.

18102019_b.JPG
 

Jerry Treiman

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I just got this one a few weeks ago, and have been loving it in my pocket, but somehow forgot to post it here. I have always wanted one of the early Illinois 14-size watches and was pleased to add this grade 123 to my collection as my first. It is an export model with different plates than the domestic version and, with 15 jewels, is one of the better grades (though not the best which had 16-21 jewels). As a higher-grade movement it also has a lovely double-sunk enamel dial. The Swiss case is 0.935 silver, a slightly higher standard than most Swiss silver (.800 or .875), and bears (pun intended) the proper hallmarks for export to England where Sterling is the standard.

1009806_f2.jpg 1009806_m.jpg 1009806_935.jpg
 

4thdimension

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I just got this one a few weeks ago, and have been loving it in my pocket, but somehow forgot to post it here. I have always wanted one of the early Illinois 14-size watches and was pleased to add this grade 123 to my collection as my first. It is an export model with different plates than the domestic version and, with 15 jewels, is one of the better grades (though not the best which had 16-21 jewels). As a higher-grade movement it also has a lovely double-sunk enamel dial. The Swiss case is 0.935 silver, a slightly higher standard than most Swiss silver (.800 or .875), and bears (pun intended) the proper hallmarks for export to England where Sterling is the standard.

View attachment 680760 View attachment 680762 View attachment 680761
Cool! I’ve never even seen one before.-Cort
 
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Rick Hufnagel

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Jerry that is fantastic. Thank you for showing it.

There was a 14s 7 jewel keywinder in this model that sold not long ago and lived in a Swiss case. It's very interesting. Maybe someday we can find a clue as to who was importing these. It's a long shot... But you never know.

BTW, If anyone is interested to know why Swiss sterling is marked .935 and not .925, David Boettcher explains it here. Fascinating.
 

Ethan Lipsig

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DTSPatrick, those Perry Marks-cased Walthams are lovely.

I have one that's just like yours, but with a Riverside A movement and a slightly different dial.

IMG_7866_edited.JPG IMG_7868_edited.JPG IMG_7874_edited.JPG

I also have a Maximus A that is just like yours except that it has a different bow and is in platinum, not gold.

Maximus A.jpg IMG_9606_edited.JPG IMG_9603_edited.JPG

I am sure you already know that the hands on your watch do not match. The hands on my two nearly identical watches are in yellow gold to match the yellow gold numerals. The hands on your watch are in white gold, making me wonder if either is original.

IMG_0143_edited.JPG
 

Jerry Treiman

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... picked up this great 10s Maximus A in a 14k white gold Perry Marks case
I have one that's just like yours, but with a Riverside A movement and a slightly different dial.
These are really neat, high-grade watches. I have the same case and numerals on a refinished dial. I bought this a long time ago and switched the original Riverside movement (23-millions serial #) for a 10A Maximus movement that I had, but I believe I kept the original dial and hands with the case. The numbers are gold but the hands are white. My case number (100690) is closer to Ethan's and my dial is the same as his (the two circles are almost hidden by the refinishing). Waltham may have been somewhat flexible with their hand choices.
26296367f.jpg
 

DTSPatrick

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I do love that Platinum case , Ethan. :love:

I could be wrong — but the numerals don’t look like yellow gold. I believe my numerals are a white metal like the hands. Obvious tarnish to the numerals and a bit of tarnish to the tip of the hands all match.

3DA121C6-3153-4283-A5B1-40ED3A74468C.jpeg
 

musicguy

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This private label Illinois is not in Gold or Platinum or even in a Silver case,
but just a regular 11 jewel in a Nickle case. This is my first watch
that winds with the stem or with a key and it is lever set. 9650 of the Columbia grade were made. It does have a
very nice feature in that it has a cut out balance cock(I do collect Elgin's with this same feature).
My understanding according to Dave C is that the cutout balance cock is not that common for Illinois
and may be only done for the private label C.H. Knights, Chicago. In addition this is
a model 3 which uses the 5th pinion to make an open face watch using a hunting movement.
All in all a very interesting watch and it came running :). It's in a much newer case than it was originally in
but looks to be original to the movement.

Circa 1880 18 size Illinois Private Label Queen for C.H. Knights Columbia grade 11 jewels

20211116_160811c.jpg 20211116_160903b.jpg
20211116_161112w.jpg 20211116_160744b.jpg




Rob
 

Paul Sullivan

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Hamilton model 6 950B #S18365 (1953)

After years of collecting 18s Hamiltons and to a lesser extent 16s models I knew I would eventually purchase one for the collection. I had been looking for a 16s Ill. A. Lincoln to go with my 12 and 18 size models. Most of the 16s A. Lincolns I came across seemed in just so so condition and I was losing interest in them. When I came across this 950B and read the presentation on the back I went ahead and purchased it at auction.
The watch presentation reads " ALBERT KLIENERT C.B. & Q. R.R. - D.C.S. 1920-1955". A long time employee, though I haven't any idea what his title of D.C.S. stands for.The Chicago Burlington and Quincy R.R. has grown over the years into BNSF, and is now the largest freight railroad company in the U.S.
The watch and case are in very good condition, and the movement keeps very accurate time, so I've been very satisfied with the watch.

950B_Dial Detail.JPG 950B_movement.JPG collage.jpg
 

butlercreek

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Hamilton model 6 950B #S18365 (1953)

After years of collecting 18s Hamiltons and to a lesser extent 16s models I knew I would eventually purchase one for the collection. I had been looking for a 16s Ill. A. Lincoln to go with my 12 and 18 size models. Most of the 16s A. Lincolns I came across seemed in just so so condition and I was losing interest in them. When I came across this 950B and read the presentation on the back I went ahead and purchased it at auction.
The watch presentation reads " ALBERT KLIENERT C.B. & Q. R.R. - D.C.S. 1920-1955". A long time employee, though I haven't any idea what his title of D.C.S. stands for.The Chicago Burlington and Quincy R.R. has grown over the years into BNSF, and is now the largest freight railroad company in the U.S.
The watch and case are in very good condition, and the movement keeps very accurate time, so I've been very satisfied with the watch.

View attachment 682386 View attachment 682387 View attachment 682388
Director of customer service?
 
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Paul Sullivan

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I did some more poking around online and did finally find one direct connection, after filtering out all the DCS (digital command systems) referrals to model RR operations. Apparently it refers to the system of Signaling used by railroads in North America called North American railway signaling which are standards for and types of methods of managing RR line traffic. The type FORM D Control System ( DCS ) is another system used.
Still, whatever Mr. Kleinert did for work he had a long career with the company!
 

Old rookie

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Rick Hufnagel

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Hello and good day Jeff! Welcome to the forum!

Great piece! The balance cock on your movement is very interesting. I've never seen a shield in the center.. I also love that dial. The seconds track... Nice.

Thank you for sharing your watch!
 
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musicguy

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Excellent B W Raymond Jeff!



Rob
 
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Joe Blossic

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Last found in the mailbox, back from service ...
Circa 1917 Hamilton 994L, 16S, 21J, OF, SN# 1155407, white gold filled Model 2 case.
Near the end of the run (1155500) one of 800 lever set made. There were either 300 or 400 pendant set also. Both types into finishing between 1913 and 1919, according to the Hamilton Finishing Records .
Except for a previously well done upper balance jewel replacement, all others were original. The roller jewel still had the factory gum and was reset.
Crown was worn and a NOS replacement sourced (thanks Jim Haney) was fitted; now all looks good on the outside.
Maybe its because you do not see as many white gold cases but I find them attractive; really sets off the blue hands and red numerals.
1.JPG 2.JPG 3.JPG 4.JPG
 

Jeff Kline

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Hello and good day Jeff! Welcome to the forum!

Great piece! The balance cock on your movement is very interesting. I've never seen a shield in the center.. I also love that dial. The seconds track... Nice.

Thank you for sharing your watch!
Very observant! I've checked my other 1st runs (although I only have a few, and not B W Raymond's) and also went to the Pocket Watch Data Base and looked at those as well, and mine is the only one with the balance cock crown pattern. Not even the one with an earlier production number. I pulled the balance cock and the serial numbers match, so it is not an after market. I have no explanation.
 

Rick Hufnagel

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Very observant! I've checked my other 1st runs (although I only have a few, and not B W Raymond's) and also went to the Pocket Watch Data Base and looked at those as well, and mine is the only one with the balance cock crown pattern. Not even the one with an earlier production number. I pulled the balance cock and the serial numbers match, so it is not an after market. I have no explanation.
Jeff,
Thank you for being so thorough. Very interesting!
 

watchbob

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Just picked this up yesterday - I've been trying to buy this for 10-15 years - previous owner had it 50 yrs -
1883 presentation to a priest from the people of the church - church engraved on the back -This priest started the fund raising to build the church - served there from 1868 thru 1909 - Church opened in 1881 - My interest came from my grandparents & parents were married there - He actually baptised my grand parents - relatives belonged there - open face 18K Dueber case Elgin Convertible with total weight of 124 Dwt - at least 75 Dwt of 18K gold - ( empty billfold today )
Very happy to keep this from being melted & hope to get it back to Delphos when I let it go in the hopefully distant future.
DSC01168.JPG DSC01169.JPG DSC01171.JPG DSC01170.JPG
 

musicguy

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Now I need to find a matching nickel chain to go with it.
Sounds good I don't go anywhere with a pocket watch that isn't on a
chain.


Rob
 

watchbob

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Wow, watchbob, what a beautiful watch and case! Who in their right mind would melt this? I think it would be worth more as a complete package. Personally I would rather have this watch than a new Rolex.
I was afraid if the previous owner passed it might not end up in a well viewed auction house - I've seen some super cases saved from scrappers & nothing would surprise me - I saved a fancy 18s box hinge 14 K case in very little used condition from my daughter in law's grandfather - he had already got a price to scrap when I found out & bought it.
 

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