• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Please Show the Most Recent Addition to Your Collection

StanJS

Registered User
Sep 20, 2006
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Regrettably, the Santa Fe Special is in a generic nickel case. I have yet to manage to unscrew the bezel. Also, there is a little gold smudge on the brass of the Liberty Bell case.
 

johnbscott

NAWCC Member
Feb 25, 2007
417
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Recently received and just restored: New York Watch Co 5500, now 150 years old and going fine, keeping excellent time. Still testing but I think it will be within a couple of seconds a day. The coin silver case is beginning to get its pocket shine after a couple of days of use.

I had to case the movement as I received it loose - certainly "hard to case" as the saying goes.

Working on the movement, itself, impressed me greatly. Absolute simplicity but everything of high quality. Interestingly, the dial has three feet - two pinned and one screwed! The blue-headed dial foot screw can be seen next to the escape wheel. The centre pinion is hollow.

A wonderful New England watch that is a testimony to the high skills of those industrious men and women of long ago.

IMG_0765.JPG IMG_0768.JPG IMG_0772.JPG IMG_0764.JPG
 
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johnbscott

NAWCC Member
Feb 25, 2007
417
312
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Yes, Rick, 15J and 18s. From its current performance, it retains its original excellent adjustments - I saw no need to tamper with either the balance or the hairspring. The balance jewels needed careful setting for proper end shake, that's all. I found all of the jewels to be completely intact. The barrel has stop work and that is intact. The pallet assembly is poised and is extremely well made, with very large and impressive pallet jewels.

The orientation of the dial plate locating pin, for case engagement, and the position of the key winding square, differ from those of most other contemporary watches. Thus I was forced to drill a new engagement hole in the case, carefully positioned to get the movement correctly orientated in respect of the pendant. I also had to enlarge the bezel seat to admit the inner portion of the dial plate. I was able to select a case that had the correct depth and lower diameter for the back plate of the movement. I needed to unpin and remove the hinged bezel to get everything done, not to damage the crystal.

My only criticism of the movement is that there is no thumbnail post on the click, even though the click is exposed, to enable mainspring letdown. Later movements have that simple feature, of course. To let down the mainspring on 5500 it is necessary to carefully disassemble the key escutcheon.

I have collected some more of these to do and I look forward to that.
 

Rick Hufnagel

Just Rick!
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Thank you for the detailed description! Stop works as well, very nice.

I suppose this is one that is sized in lines instead of 18s? Some of the earlier ads show the size in lines, but my conversions are not coming out correctly so I don't quite know. My John L King fits an 18s case perfectly, but unfortunately the balance staff is broken, so it will be a future project. The locating pin is the same as yours, as is the click. Sorry just kind of thinking out loud (or typing out loud). Trying to learn about these 3/4 plate movements and your first hand experience is priceless, thank you very much!

Congrats!
 

Fred Hansen

NAWCC Member
Aug 18, 2002
5,412
476
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Great buy Stan!

I’ve done a decent amount of study on the Illinois Washington Watch Co. production runs, and I believe there were 800 Liberty Bell Grade 69 HC made which fall in the following 17 runs ...

1704151-250
1737131-180
1749661-720
1859051-150
1859861-960
2024941-970
2032111-140
2082781-800
2131051-100
2151291-320
2202841-860
2424091-120
2486661-730
2779981-990
2799401-430
2940301-330
3040801-840
 
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Fred Hansen

NAWCC Member
Aug 18, 2002
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Thanks for that information, Fred. They are not as uncommon as I thought. :-(
Still not common though and over 15 times less plentiful than the open face version which I believe had 13370 made.

A challenging and fun pair to keep an eye for is the earlier 15 jewel 18 size Liberty Bell, with I believe 750 made of the open face and only a single run of 80 made of the hunting case.
 

musicguy

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Jan 12, 2017
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Steven Thornberry

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Jan 15, 2004
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An 18s Seth Thomas Model 3, Grade 33 (7 jewel) in a Dueber Silverine case. The Model 3's were apparently made between 1888 and 1898 ( Model 3 | Seth Thomas Research ). I happened to find an 1890 catalogue illustration of an 18s Grade 33 in volume 2 of Tran Duy Ly's book on Seth Thomas Clocks and Watches (3rd ed., 2004).

Dial.JPG Movement.JPG Inside Back Cover.JPG Grade 33 Tran.JPG
 

Jerry Treiman

NAWCC Member
Golden Circle
Aug 25, 2000
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Ive had this one for some years, its a Swiss "Fake" RR watch.

View attachment 639709
Actually, you might call it an American fake. I believe this was made by the New York Standard Watch Co. and was intended to deceive buyers into thinking they were getting an honest jeweled movement.
 

Pat L.

NAWCC Member
Jul 28, 2003
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Here's a hunting case pocket watch that was acquired at a nearby online auction earlier this week. The movement wasn't shown in the auction pictures. I bought it because it had an interesting case and dial, and hoping that the movement might be worthwhile.

I found that the movement isn't marked with the maker's name, so after getting it home and comparing it with the EA pictures in the Ehrhardt "Beginning to End" book and then later with pictures in the Hernick & Arnold "Hampden Watch Co." book, it seems like it might be a Hampden model 2 movement. The movement serial number is 69591 and it's marked "Regulator". I haven't found another with this marking, so maybe it's a private label movement. The Henry Burgell serial number lookup table indicates that it could be a model 2 with 15 jewels, if it truly is a Hampden.

The dial is decorated with Masonic symbols. The name above the hand shaft is "T. J. Roberts & Co." but it's partially obscured by one of the symbols. Above the seconds bit it's marked "P. C. Cornwall" (first letter may not be a P).

The case was made by "Philadelphia Watch Case Co." and is marked "Silverode". Notice that the front cover is engraved "Chicago" with a large letter "M" preceding Chicago. Also, above and toward the right of "Chicago" is an unknown letter or symbol.

I guess I'd like confirmation that this really is a Hampden model 2 watch movement. and if not, what is it?
Does anyone have any insight as to what the engraving on the case means ("M Chicago" and the symbol above it)?
And does anyone know if “P. C. Cornwall” is a Masonic reference?
TJ Roberts & Co. may have been a jeweler. Does anyone recognize this name?

The movement does run and keeps good time. It was run for a couple of days, but the movement looks pretty dirty, so I let it run down and it can rest for now.

Thanks to everyone for taking the time to read through this. All comments are welcome.

Hampden 1.jpg Hampden 2.jpg Hampden 3.jpg Hampden 4.jpg Hampden 5.jpg Hampden 6.jpg Hampden 7.jpg
 

Rick Hufnagel

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Great movement!

Yes it's a Hampden model two. It's a Perry grade which is second in line to the Railway grade for the top spot. A wonderful movement. From what I can find, this is the lowest serial numbers for model two. You watch looks like the first run of normal production Perry model twos. I've only recorded one lower serial number, 70ish lower than yours.
 
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Rick Hufnagel

Just Rick!
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To expand on this, the earliest Hampden model twos have a hollow center pinion, male winding arbor and a different setting lever. These appear at 75,000-75,999 for the nickel. These are general runs and may not be exact for start and finish.

Other than these, there is an odd early group of Railway and Perry model twos that look like normal production, with no hollow center pinion and a normal stem and lever. These seem to be 69,500-69,999 with Perry as the first half and Railway the later half. Again an estimate for the runs. This is where yours fits, and it's really neat to see thank you!
 
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Pat L.

NAWCC Member
Jul 28, 2003
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Rick,
Thanks for confirming that the watch is a Hampden. And thanks for the additional information about the early model 2's.
 

PatH

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Dec 5, 2014
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Great watch, Pat L. I've seen these ink colors and font style on dial embellishments from US World's Fairs around the turn of the century, but I've not been able to find details as to who added them, or what the cost was. Perhaps others can add more insight to help determine the history of your watch. This might be grasping at straws, but could the A M Chicago on the case be a reference to a masonic lodge in Chicago? Normally it's A. F. and A. M. - there is room for "AF &" before the A on the top line. Sure wish this watch could talk!
 
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Pat L.

NAWCC Member
Jul 28, 2003
71
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PatH,
Thanks for your comments about the watch. I hadn't thought of the upper right symbol as being a letter "A", but maybe it is. I just thought it was a symbol of some kind.

I looked for the name "T J Roberts" in a couple of Chicago city directories from that time period (before/after 1878), but found nothing, looking in the residential section, and in the business section under both jeweler and watchmaker.

There's a Masonic library that offers free information so I sent a message to them asking whether "P. C. Cornwall" has any Masonic meaning. If an actual human person replies, I'll ask them about the "A M Chicago" markings.

Thanks again, Pat L.
 

4thdimension

NAWCC Member
Oct 18, 2001
2,569
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A. F.&A.M. would be Ancient Free & Accepted Mason and F.&A.M and A.M. would a portion of that term. I would assume the watch belonged to an Accepted Mason in Chicago.-Cort
 
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