• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Please Show the Most Recent Addition to Your Collection

Clint Geller

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My latest addition, from the most recent J&H auction, is this 18k open face Elgin Grade 72 21j "convertible," which is unusual because it is a triple-signed Bailey, Banks & Biddle PL. Only about 450 Grade 72 were made; very few of them were private labelled.

I collect Elgin 21j convertibles. I now have three Grade 72s and three Grade 91s. I also collect Jeannot & Shiebler-cased watches, another category this BBB PL ticks off.

View attachment 628023 View attachment 628024 View attachment 628025

View attachment 628026 View attachment 628027 View attachment 628028

I think the movement will glisten once I get it cleaned.

The damascening on each of myGrade 72s is different

View attachment 628022 View attachment 628029

The dials on all my 21j convertibles are similar double-sunk enamel dials, but there are subtle differences.

Arabic Dials, Red Arabic Numeral Minute Track
View attachment 628023 View attachment 628030
Bold Arabic Dial, Red Arabic Numeral Minute Track
View attachment 628033
Arabic Dial, Blue Arabic Numeral Minute Track
View attachment 628032
Roman Numeral Dial, No Minute Track
View attachment 628031
Roman Numeral Dial, Red Arabic Numeral Minute Track
View attachment 628034
Great watches, Ethan. My watchmaker, whom you know, informs me that the 21 jewel Elgin convertibles are the only American watches he has ever examined in which the train jewels are "olive holed and bombe'ed [pronounced 'bom-bay-ed' - diacritical marks aren't possible here]," such that they have an hourglass shaped cross-section. By "olive holed," he means that the IDs of the hole jewels are contoured such that the cylindrical sides of the wheel arbors make contact effectively only along single lines rather than on entire cylindrical surfaces. Similarly, "bombe'ed" means that the flat step near either end of each wheel arbor, necessary for controlling endshake, makes contact with the hole jewel only along a single line, rather than on an entire annular surface. In this configuration, capillary action draws oil to the narrowest areas of intersection and keeps it there. These watches also have a large number of gold parts, and some decorated surfaces usually visible only to watchmakers (and of course, modern collectors).
 
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Rick Hufnagel

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This one is a bit odd. It has lower production for an Elgin, and needed more love than most would give it, so I brought it home.

I had thought the solid plate layout for the Elgin 16s model 5 only applied to the 7 jewel, but this popped up and proved me wrong. Always fun to find new surprises.

SN 7552264, grade 195, 16s model 5.

Managed to clean it up pretty well. Should have seen it before hand... Whew!
IMG_20201221_211234342.jpg

The dial was not nice, but I left it in the magic dial solution overnight and it came out looking much better.
IMG_20201221_211050529.jpg

Philadelphia silverode case. Original to the movement. Typically when you see one of these bigger old model 16s movements in a case of this style, it's a recase and the back rim has been filed down to fit the larger movement. This one is just as it was made. A neat find. I put the bow on it, it had a makeshift loop beforehand.

IMG_20201221_211300877~3.jpg

So why even mess with this? Well it's different and I wanted to check it out & record it. There are 1000 serial numbers in one run. It's strangely late for a model 5. Doesn't appear in the 1896 list... So it was made a few years later. Well into the newer model production. The dial wouldn't typically be seen on old model 16s, but it matches the dating and grade of this watch. (Single sunk glass enamel with fleur de lis signature).

I don't know why it exists. Personally I think it's an export, but there is no proof of anything. It could just as easily have been a lower cost 15 jewel option made for a specific wholesale agent, or an attempt to use up old model parts. Lots of speculation there, sorry.

If anyone runs across the 195 in a catalog sheet, please give a shout!
 

Tom McIntyre

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Nice watch and very close to the end of the line for the 1872 model.:thumb:
 

Joe Blossic

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Nice watch and very close to the end of the line for the 1872 model.:thumb:
Thanks Tom, I was realized it was 18 years into the model but hadn't considered it was near the end of those produced.
Do you know if the Champion grade was anything different from previous 16J grades or perhaps just a marketing idea to finish out the model?
Thanks, Joe
 

Tom McIntyre

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There were nominally only 5 more produced after yours. They were not necessarily finished in numerical order.

The damaskeened and gilt finish is uncommon but the movement was probably not adjusted.

I like the appearance of them.
 
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Jerry Treiman

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It was a number of decades ago when, as a young collector, I spent hours poring over “the Gray Book”, Waltham’s record of serial numbers, models and grades. I was looking for oddities and information on production quantities. One feature that caught my eye were several blocks of serial numbers assigned to 12-size Riverside grade movements with 18 jewels! Now even I recognized that an EVEN number of jewels was an ODD number of jewels for an American watch. But it wasn’t until 2004 that I finally saw one of these watches on eBay, only to discover that the 18th jewel was really a bit of bling - a cap jewel on the center wheel! I was outbid, but my interest was definitely piqued. These unusual watches, which also have a distinctive off-center damaskeen pattern, were private label models and production was relatively low - fewer than 100. There were even some 16-size 1888 model movements with 18 jewels (capped center wheel) and marked "Ultimatum".
see also - https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/18-jewel-waltham-12-size.37042/

Just within the past few years I learned of the existence of a 20-jewel model marked “Ultimatum” - a 19-jewel Riverside-grade with that puzzling center cap jewel added to it. It looks like there may have been a production run of ten of these, and I was thrilled to be able to buy one recently from Fred Hansen. It just arrived in my mailbox this past weekend. (Actually, it never made it into my mailbox as I was standing at the curb waiting for my mail carrier to deliver it).
7565208o.jpg

I have searched, with no success, to find out the story behind the Ultimatum label so if anyone has any information on this I, and many others, would love to hear about it. I suspect the unusual damaskeen pattern may have been for a particular jobber, but that is just speculation at the moment.
 

DTSPatrick

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Today I opened up the mailbox to a surprise — not sure yet if a good surprise or not. Diamond in the rough, probably not.
I found this gold 6s case (not so interested in the watch movement really — even though it’s in great condition) for a fair price. Marked “Standard” and “US Assay”. Did a little research and most agree it is solid 10k in construction; however, I’ve seen no trademark to fully substantiate this.
Now the surprise — when I opened up the package today, the color of the case was almost a Cheetos orange. I was afraid I got swindled. But, a little Cape Cod polishing cloth and the case began to pop. The case still has a rose quality to the gold.
My question: Does lower carat gold tarnish? This is my first lower carat gold case. I’ve never seen this reaction even on a less expensive gold filled case (which is obviously a higher carat gold on the exterior).

24F5EEFA-94DE-473A-B113-15CBED795ECC.jpeg 20F90B1D-9AE8-4F17-822F-6AA578B7EAE6.jpeg 6159E261-D5B4-4BC8-854B-FCE36DD0C434.jpeg A1C21499-20FF-4D4E-B099-024CCCD0D953.jpeg 1A368D59-73A8-4359-9B0A-DAB8B5EBF3BD.jpeg
 

netsch20

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I can't really show all of my recent acquisitions as it includes ~100 total that I inherited from my grandfather this past summer, but I'll show a couple nice ones haha.

An Elgin 156 under the CD Peacock private label (with an unfortunate replacement hour hand that I'll be getting replaced with a correct one):
20210114_170932.jpg 20210114_171220.jpg

And my Canadian Pacific Railway Waltham:
20201221_204225.jpg 20201221_204403.jpg
 

rrwatch

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Bila

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A Nice Pick-up Lee, also had one of these a little time back, another 50 or so serials away from yours (later), and yes, as has been said, no advertising has been seen for them. Someone doing previous research had dubbed them with a "Research Grade Designation" of #272.
 
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Ethan Lipsig

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Although I bought this watch four years ago, it has been with my watchmaker that entire period (he is very backlogged ). I just got it back. So, it feels like a new acquisition. It is an 18k Illinois Grade 439, almost certainly in a Knapp case, but the case is unsigned. Grade 439 was the most highly finished of a quartet of similar grades. Illinois only made about 3,500 of all four grades; Grade 435s and 439s are the scarcest: Grade 435 (17 jewel; 310 made), 437 (19 jewel; 2060 made); 438 (21 jewel; 1,130 made); 439 (21 jewel "extra"; 330-370 made). I now have 1 Grade 435, 1 Grade 437, 3 Grade 438s, and 4 Grade 439s, all in solid gold or platinum cases.

DSC07182.JPG IMG_4744.JPG IMG_4746.JPG IMG_4748.JPG IMG_4750.JPG IMG_4749.JPG
 

Rodney Leon

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Just picked up this near mint Hamilton 1960, Traffic Special pocket watch, Hamilton's Swiss caliber 669 17 jewels, Montgomery single sunk dial, Hamilton gold rolled 10K star case no.P577418. I have 19 other Hamiltons and wanted one of these to add to the collection. I know some diehard Hamilton collectors wouldn’t not consider this a real Hamilton but I like it.

669.jpg dial.jpg DSC_0555.jpg face.jpg
 

Rhett Lucke

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Just picked up this near mint Hamilton 1960, Traffic Special pocket watch, Hamilton's Swiss caliber 669 17 jewels, Montgomery single sunk dial, Hamilton gold rolled 10K star case no.P577418. I have 19 other Hamiltons and wanted one of these to add to the collection. I know some diehard Hamilton collectors wouldn’t not consider this a real Hamilton but I like it.
In my opinion, its part of the Hamilton Story and certainly worth consideration as part of a Hamilton Collection
 

darrahg

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Here is my latest: 18s 23j Seth Thomas, circa 1890, clearly the tops of my little Seth Thomas collection. Now I'm going to take a break while I'm still in the black.

I agree with rrwatch and Bila that you have a super model 5 Seth Thomas with an undocumented grade. However, a grade of 272, as Bila mentions, was placed on this watch by John Miller according to Uberall & Singer, (Dec 98 in NAWCC Bulletin p777) for research purposes. If you are tracking them, my 272 is 15 numbers below yours.
 
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Rodney Leon

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Just Got and cleaned this Hamilton 1924, 16 size, grade 974 Electric Railway Special. Serial number 1680371, Lever set. Adjusted. Dueber 10K yellow gold-filled case, No. 11320999, Single sunk, Montgomery dial. Have found a little information on these watches but wanted to know how many positions it was adjusted too if anyone knows. Not sure what cases they came in if any, or was it up to the owner at that time what to use? Thanks Rod

974.jpg face.jpg
 

Jim Haney

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Rodney,
These were not adjusted to any positions, just temperature. They were made for Streetcar & Trolley use.

They had 3 variants signatures to these Railway dials.

You can move your cursor to research at the top and then down to company Records and click on it and then Lowell Howell Notes on Hamilton records to find out about any Hamilton grades
 

Paul Sullivan

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I bought tis awhile back at a J&H auction.

Hamilton 938 ser. no. 6602 sold to F.B. Catlin of Winsted Ct. 12/11/1894. No. 6601 was sold to J.W. Forsinger of Chicago 1/09/1895 but it was then returned by them and rec'd at the factory 12/28/1898; some three years later. It was then sold to G.W. Maxwell of Tuscalousa Alabama on 8/16/1899.
So it appears 6602 was sold a bit before 6601 the first 938. The watch is cased in a Star W.C.Co.,OF, screw bezel and back, 0.925 sterling siver case (not original) which is qiuite worn. The dial had hiar lines at 3 and 37 mins. I soaked it a few times in Polydent, which cleaned them out pretty good. I also oiled the pinions, and regulated the movement with a timer. So far it seems to run very well.



Movement 938 no. 6202  (14).JPG 936 dial post cleaning.JPG collage.jpg
 

Leigh Callaway

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Here is 6648, another first run 938. Not my "most recent" - came to me from J&H a year ago and not yet posted - but I hope it adds to the conversation.
From finishing on April 3, 1895 and sold 12 days later to G.F. Stowe of Manchester NH.
Has an interesting and unusual marking "938" on the barrel bridge.

Ham 938 6648 Dial.jpg Ham 938 JnH 02.jpg Ham 938 6648 Mvmt.jpg

Ham 938 JnH 03.jpg Ham 938 JnH 05.jpg
Photos courtesy Jones & Horan

So now we have three Hamilton 938s from the first run.
 
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Paul Sullivan

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Yes, Leigh's is stamped with 17 jewels twice while 6602 lacks any engraved jewel number at all on the train plate or barrel plate. And like Kenny it's something I haven't seen before either.

From looking at other examples, 17jewels remained on the train plate until the last run, when it moved to the left of the barrel bridge, the grade appeared on the right, and double roller in the middle. Another change in the final run was adding 5 positions under "Adjusted" on the train plate. Also somewhere along the line the serial number and "Adjusted" also swapped places.
 

vintageguy

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I'd been looking for a South Bend 293 for more than two years when I bought this one online from Fred in December. I got it as a Christmas gift for myself. I was waiting to find a set of Ferguson hands before posting it, but since Ferguson hands are scarce, there was none to be found. I understand that Ferguson South Bend dials are more scarce than some of the others, and I'd never seen one before. Anyway, I really like this watch. Ser. # 438818, Ca. 1906.

IMG_8511x.jpg IMG_8528x.jpg IMG_8516x.jpg IMG_8523x.jpg s-l1600.jpg IMG_8523xx.jpg
 
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PatH

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What a nice Christmas gift!! Thanks for including a picture of the dial back. I had never seen one, and didn't realize that Ferguson's patents were listed.
 

vintageguy

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What a nice Christmas gift!! Thanks for including a picture of the dial back. I had never seen one, and didn't realize that Ferguson's patents were listed.
I just learned about this recently too, Pat. The dial back photo is actually Fred's from the listing - I hope he doesn't mind that I used it.
 
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Mike M.

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I'd been looking for a South Bend 293 for more than two years when I bought this one online from Fred in December. I got it as a Christmas gift for myself. I was waiting to find a set of Ferguson hands before posting it, but since Ferguson hands are scarce, there was none to be found. I understand that Ferguson South Bend dials are more scarce than some of the others, and I'd never seen one before. Anyway, I really like this watch. Ser. # 438818, Ca. 1906.

View attachment 635314 View attachment 635315 View attachment 635316 View attachment 635317 View attachment 635318 View attachment 635319
I like 19 jewelers in general, but I love the 293. They are definitely among the most beautifully damaskeened.
I love the Ferguson dial on yours, Nice find!
 
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vintageguy

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I like 19 jewelers in general, but I love the 293. They are definitely among the most beautifully damaskeened.
I love the Ferguson dial on yours, Nice find!
Thanks Mike! I'm a fan of 17J and 19J standard watches generally, and the dial on this one was just a huge bonus.

For some reason its seems like factory South Bend dials didn't stand the test of time as well as some of the others. I guess Ferguson said to himself "if I can't find a dial, I'll make one instead." ;)
 

Tom Huber

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I can't really show all of my recent acquisitions as it includes ~100 total that I inherited from my grandfather this past summer, but I'll show a couple nice ones haha.

An Elgin 156 under the CD Peacock private label (with an unfortunate replacement hour hand that I'll be getting replaced with a correct one):
View attachment 633409 View attachment 633411

And my Canadian Pacific Railway Waltham:
View attachment 633412 View attachment 633413
I also have an Elgin 156 With a C.D. Peacock DS dial. My watchis exactly like your dial. TheSN
on mine is 6,469,545.

Tom

Tom
 
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Greg Frauenhoff

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I still enjoy buying an interesting watch that looks to have not been monkied around with too much, even if it's not in my particular area of interest. Here is a recent Hampden find. Comes in a beefy 6 oz. case (178g without crystal, 187g with thick crystal, so 6.28/6.59 ounces (avoirdupois) or 5.72/6.01 troy ounces.)


P1050266.JPG P1050267.JPG P1050268.JPG P1050269.JPG P1050270.JPG
 

Rick Hufnagel

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Awesome, Greg.

Can you confirm if it's 16,200 or 18,000 bph?

I know that may seem like a crazy question to some, but I found an early model two HWCo that is 16,200bph, and I'm determined that there has to be a model 1 counterpart.
 

Paul Sullivan

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1948 Waltham Vanguard 16 size Model A Grade no. 1623- 23 jewels, 8 adjustments, no. 33309300.

Some of the pocket watches I've been interested in lately have been 16s models from,Elgin and Waltham, that were produced from WWII to their final years when U.S. production ended. For Waltham the Gray book shows January 1953 for the last assembly and casing of 16s movements (ser. nos. 33765838 to 37680900) some 15,062 Vanguard 23J LS, grade 1623s. My latest Elgin is a 1952 but I believe I read in a thread some production went to 1955.
Unlike some late models this 1623 has nice Geneva stripes on it's plates and is in it's original Star W.C. Co. 10k GF SB&B case, which is still in great condition. The dial doesn't look great having a bit of a sloppy hand painted touch up to the inner circle and some worn away lettering. But what really counts is the watch still keeps amazing time. After I removed the dial and oiled all the pinions and figured it's positional errors. I wore it for 21 days straight. starting with an error of +1 sec. and ending with an error of +6s. That includes quit a bit of walking and lately shoveling snow along with my dual sedentary study majors of streaming TV and putzing around with watches.
I tested the watch on my timer and did have to move the regulator more to slow yet it still holds a good amplitude and tiny beat error.

Vangrd 33309300 mvmnt post da.JPG Vangrd 33309300 Dial detail.JPG




collage b.jpg Vangrd 33309300 Dial 2 .JPG
 

Joe Blossic

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Last found in the mailbox ...
Circa 1902 Elgin Grade 270, SN# 9860390, M9-Bridge, 16S, 21J, OF.
An orphan movement I picked up a few years ago, dial courtesy of Fred. hands courtesy of Marty. Just back from assembly and restoration, and an excellent timekeeper to boot.
1.JPG 2.JPG 3.JPG 4.JPG
 

James J Nicholson

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Last found in the mailbox ...
Circa 1902 Elgin Grade 270, SN# 9860390, M9-Bridge, 16S, 21J, OF.
An orphan movement I picked up a few years ago, dial courtesy of Fred. hands courtesy of Marty. Just back from assembly and restoration, and an excellent timekeeper to boot.
View attachment 637971 View attachment 637972 View attachment 637973 View attachment 637974
Definitly has the WOW factor. It looks absolutely stunning. Great combination of dial and hand choices. Great job giving this orphan a new life.
 

Clint Geller

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Last found in the mailbox ...
Circa 1902 Elgin Grade 270, SN# 9860390, M9-Bridge, 16S, 21J, OF.
An orphan movement I picked up a few years ago, dial courtesy of Fred. hands courtesy of Marty. Just back from assembly and restoration, and an excellent timekeeper to boot.
View attachment 637971 View attachment 637972 View attachment 637973 View attachment 637974
Knock-out dial and great winding wheels. The gold inlaid engraving combined with damaskeening is really interesting too.
 

vintageguy

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Well, this one is not new to my collection, but the in-depth research is new to me and it's pretty exciting.

It's Wm. Ellery # 218389, with an April - November 1866 production according to the Waltham factory ledger. What's special is the case" The rear inside cover is inscribed "J.R. Woodside Thomasville Mo." The Year "1866" is also scratched on the front cover interior and dust cover exterior, although who might have done that is anyone's guess. When I first acquired the watch I ran a simple internet search for JR Woodside, which yielded a couple references to Thomasville, Missouri and a referenced to JR Woodside as its "pioneer founder." But yesterday, when doing additional research, I found out a whole lot more.

Turns out JR Woodside was a storied and prominent Missouri civil war civil war figure, judge and politician. From what I've gathered, he served as a private in the Missouri State Guard (MSG) CSA, was later commissioned and was then appointed as colonel in the 7th Division of the MSG with authority to raise a regiment, in which position he recruited his son, Captain James Posey Woodside. They both fought at the Battle of Oak Hills or Wilson’s Creek in August 1861. After the MSG was disbanded, JR Woodside entered the 4th Missouri Infantry and was seriously wounded (and reported as killed by Union authorities) in the four-hour battle at Mammoth Spring in March, 1862. He was also captured a total of three times (and escaped once) and was at one point sent to the Union's Gratiot Street Prison in St. Louis.

After the war he was elected Circuit Judge for Thirteenth District of Missouri, serving in that capacity from 1871 - 1887. He and his son formed a United Confederate Veterans Camp in West Plains, which apparently still exists today as Sons of Confederate Veterans - Col. John R. Woodside, Camp #203. He died at his home in Thomasville in 1887.

Interestingly, a Toronto rare book dealer is currently offering for sale the handwritten diary of his son, James Posey Woodside, with a price tag of $14,855.99 (presumably Canadian . . . :) ) The sale headline reads: "ORIGINAL, HANDWRITTEN JOURNAL AND DIARY OF A YOUNG CONFEDERATE SOLDIER, HELD PRISONER AND THEN WITNESSING THE LAWLESS AFTERMATH OF THE CIVIL WAR AND THE 'BUSHWHACKERS' WHO TERRORIZED THE MISSOURI POPULACE." :eek:

The watch is housed in the ubiquitous yet somehow yet-to-be-identified F.M. coin silver case. Anyway, here are some pictures:



IMG_9349x.jpg IMG_9359x.jpg IMG_9328x.jpg IMG_9329x.jpg IMG_9339x.jpg IMG_9317x.jpg IMG_9322x.jpg IMG_9337x.jpg

Mike
 

Clint Geller

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Well, this one is not new to my collection, but the in-depth research is new to me and it's pretty exciting.

It's Wm. Ellery # 218389, with an April - November 1866 production according to the Waltham factory ledger. What's special is the case" The rear inside cover is inscribed "J.R. Woodside Thomasville Mo." The Year "1866" is also scratched on the front cover interior and dust cover exterior, although who might have done that is anyone's guess. When I first acquired the watch I ran a simple internet search for JR Woodside, which yielded a couple references to Thomasville, Missouri and a referenced to JR Woodside as its "pioneer founder." But yesterday, when doing additional research, I found out a whole lot more.

Turns out JR Woodside was a storied and prominent Missouri civil war civil war figure, judge and politician. From what I've gathered, he served as a private in the Missouri State Guard (MSG) CSA, was later commissioned and was then appointed as colonel in the 7th Division of the MSG with authority to raise a regiment, in which position he recruited his son, Captain James Posey Woodside. They both fought at the Battle of Oak Hills or Wilson’s Creek in August 1861. After the MSG was disbanded, JR Woodside entered the 4th Missouri Infantry and was seriously wounded (and reported as killed by Union authorities) in the four-hour battle at Mammoth Spring in March, 1862. He was also captured a total of three times (and escaped once) and was at one point sent to the Union's Gratiot Street Prison in St. Louis.

After the war he was elected Circuit Judge for Thirteenth District of Missouri, serving in that capacity from 1871 - 1887. He and his son formed a United Confederate Veterans Camp in West Plains, which apparently still exists today as Sons of Confederate Veterans - Col. John R. Woodside, Camp #203. He died at his home in Thomasville in 1887.

Interestingly, a Toronto rare book dealer is currently offering for sale the handwritten diary of his son, James Posey Woodside, with a price tag of $14,855.99 (presumably Canadian . . . :) ) The sale headline reads: "ORIGINAL, HANDWRITTEN JOURNAL AND DIARY OF A YOUNG CONFEDERATE SOLDIER, HELD PRISONER AND THEN WITNESSING THE LAWLESS AFTERMATH OF THE CIVIL WAR AND THE 'BUSHWHACKERS' WHO TERRORIZED THE MISSOURI POPULACE." :eek:

The watch is housed in the ubiquitous yet somehow yet-to-be-identified F.M. coin silver case. Anyway, here are some pictures:



View attachment 638166 View attachment 638167 View attachment 638168 View attachment 638169 View attachment 638170 View attachment 638171 View attachment 638172 View attachment 638173

Mike
The date of 1866 inscribed on the case is accurate. Your movement was finished betweeen April and November of that year. I find it interesting that a former Confederate would have chosen to buy a Yankee watch rather than a Swiss or an English one, both of which would have been readily available. It suggests that Waltham's increasing reputation had crossed the battle lines.
 
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StanJS

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Sep 20, 2006
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My latest addition to my collection is an Illinois 3-fer that I won by losing.

Since I am what is euphemistically called “between jobs”, antique watches are not high on my list of purchases. However, I saw this lot of 3 and decided that I wanted them. I watched them for days. On the last day, shortly before the auction ended, I put in a high bid of $168. I continued to watch the auction and in the last minutes, I was outbid. I kept upping my bid until I got to $226 and then just couldn’t justify going higher given my financial situation. The other bidder’s limit was higher than mine and the auction closed at $227.

Several days later, the seller notified me that the buyer had no intention of paying for the lot and, since I was the last high bidder, I could purchase the lot, if I wanted. Since the last time I was the winning bidder was at $168, that was the price ($180.50 with S&H). Well, I pulled my credit card out so fast my wallet got whiplash. I then had to wait a long week for them to be shipped and another long week for them to travel cross country to me.

Here are the watches from least interesting to most interesting (and smallest to largest).

First, Illinois, circa 1926, Model 3, Grade 405, 12s, 17J, OF, S/N 4801924, 390,360 made (according to Russ Snyder’s/Chapter 149 Illinois database).

Illinois4801924Case.jpg Illinois4801924Movement.jpg Illinois4801924Dial.jpg

Second, Illinois, circa 1916, Model 7, Grade 306, 16s, 17J, OF, S/N 2973017, Santa Fe Special, 1300 of the 7120 306s were Santa Fe Watch Co.

IllinoisSantaFeSpec2973017Movement.jpg IllinoisSantaFeSpec2973017.jpg

And last, Illinois, circa 1908, Model 5, Grade 69, 18s, 17J, HC, S/N 2082785, Washington Watch Co. Liberty Bell. 200 of the 18,887 HC 69s were Washington Watch Co. Since this watch falls in a run of 20 that are not listed as Washington Watch Co., we can up that to 220. Is this the correct number? In any case, it looks like the Illinois database needs a wee update.

IllinoisLibertyBellCase2082785.jpg IllinoisLibertyBell2082785Movement.jpg IllinoiseLibertyBell2082785Dial.jpg
 
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Aurora's 15 Ruby Jewel Movements by Greg Frauenhoff

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