Please Rise

Bruce Alexander

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Don't go cheap when buying instruments or clocks! :)
Except maybe when you're learning. ;)

Regarding the young "student", yes, she's still trying to master the basics I think and her tempo is off in spots but I don't hear or see a metronome or drummer. There are some awesome, very accomplished musicians in this Thread. How cool would it have been to see , hear and enjoy bangster's band?! Great Thread conversation though.
 
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shutterbug

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When I was teaching, parents would buy their kids the cheapest crap they could find. Often the strings were so far off the frets that even I couldn't play the things. Buy the best you can afford, and sell it again if it doesn't work out. That's my advise :)
 
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Bruce Alexander

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Yes, of course SB. That's an extreme example. "Crap" is a non-starter and goes back to the "Seller". But maybe that was the best the parents could afford for their child. If the instrument was unplayable, were you able to advise them? Maybe they had no clue about instruments and they just got swindled. Who knows?

You're right, an unplayable instrument will probably crush an early interest, but would you buy an elementary school child a top of the line instrument that professional musicians use even if you could afford it? A used instrument in any market is not new. Just like anything else, finding the right buyer for it at a fair price might not be that easy *especially* if the child has not taken proper care of it.

Do the best with what you have and your best will get better.

The young musician's "crap" guitar didn't sound terrible to me. Imagine how much better her playing might sound if her professional musician father let her have his guitar? I think he knows what he is doing, but not every music student has a musician for a parent.

Did you enjoy teaching?

Regards,

Bruce
 

Phil G4SPZ

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Only just spotted this thread! Belated 'Many Happy Returns' to you Bangster, and also my personal thanks for your work on getting "This Old Clock" back into print. A great book, to which I refer regularly, and I just wish I'd had my copy when I started out servicing American clocks!

Phil
 
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shutterbug

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Did you enjoy teaching?
For the most part I did. I had my own studio before I was drafted, and taught six days a week as well as playing Friday and Saturday nights in a band. The Army screwed that all up for me.
 

Bruce Alexander

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Okay. I'm beginning to better understand your point. I was relating back to public school music classes. Come to think of it, I don't recall any of my fellow students playing guitar, even in "Stage Band". If you were giving private lessons, it's kind of hard to understand why a parent would put a toy musical instrument in their child's hands. "Here...make my child a Lead Guitarist, Mr. Teacher! Do you have a Nintendo he can plug into?" :chuckling:

Regards
 

MuseChaser

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I played in a keyboard/guitar/drums trio for many hears with a truly great friend of mine who was one of the best jazz and rock guitarists around. Like most great full time players, he was also in demand as a teacher.

He had one student who was a beginner. After taking a couple lessons, the student's mother informed my friend that the student had decided to discontinue lessons so that he could focus on "Guitar Hero."

I wish that wasn't a true story, but it is. One of the many times I've wept for the world.

The guitarist in the linked video is my friend. I'm not in this cut, but I've worked with the singer and bass player on many occasions, too. Great musicians. It's not bluegrass, however...I hope no one, Bangster especially, minds the digression. The guitarist plays mostly rhythm guitar, just propeling the groove here..no solo work, even though he's probably the best player in the band. He was always happy to just make everyone ELSE sound great. As a jazz piano player, due to flexibility and complexity in voicing and choosing upper chord extensions, it can be very difficult to "gel" with a guitar player and not step on each other's toes. The Bill Evans/Jim Hall duo recordings are a great example of two of the world's best making it work beautifully. Mark was the only guitarist I ever felt truly comfortable playing with in a jazz setting. A truly amazing musician. I miss playing with him terribly. He's still with us, but Parkinson's stole his body and his ability to play and care for himself.

"Alliance" in tribute concert


 
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shutterbug

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Nice! Times have sure changed. It's too hard to try to get a gig that would make the night financially beneficial for that many players now. I've seen many accomplished musicians (including my older sister who taught me) reduced to playing rhythm to canned music (karaoke tracks). But she's almost 80 now and still doing what she loves.
 

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