Please help identify this Seth Thomas movement

chastings

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Jul 10, 2016
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I recently bought this movement because, well, I love how they look.
I don't know what it is... hope you can help.
Its about 8 inches tall, 4 inches wide, by 4.5 inches deep.
It has calendar wheels on top; I didn't see a month but I see dates and AM/PM (but the AM and PM are inverse!!!)
So what is it, and what kind of clock does it fit into, and how do I wind it, and is it WAY above the ability of a very amateur clock admirer to fix it?
Thanks all!
C
 

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shutterbug

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Tran doesn't seem to show that one.
 

WRabbit

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It reminds me of a timeclock I used to "punch in" at a food joint I worked in as a teen.

Jim
 

chastings

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If you look on the right side, theres a place to put a key.
So I put a key there. And I turned it 2 revolutions.
And nothing happened.
 

JTD

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Sep 27, 2005
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I think it is a timeclock of some sort, as WRabbit suggests. If by 'inverse' you mean the PM/AM are written back to front ('mirror writing') that is because the time would have been impressed a paper strip and they had to be that way in order to come out the right way round (if you see what I mean!). Same principle as making a rubber stamp.

It appears to have a balance escapement. The fact that you could only turn the key two turns probably indicates that the movement was already almost fully wound. There seem to be two more winding arbors, probably the left hand one is to drive the date mechanism, and the third may be to alter the hands and/or the dates.

Apart from the fact that it is entirely full of dirt, fluff and old oil, I don't see any reason why it couldn't be made to run just as a clock. I'm not sure from the photo whether the dial is there, with all the figures worn off, or if it is missing entirely. That would have to be dealt with, and suitable hands found.

As for whether you could do that yourself, it isn't really one I would recommend somebody tackling as their first clock. A time only pendulum clock is far easier. Clocks with added wheels for subsidiary things (dates and time in your case) are often rather complicated. But it depends on you. If you do decide to jump in the deep end,let us know before you start and folks will be on hand to give you some tips on how to start dismantling the movement.

All I have said is based on my impressions and what I can see. I have not seen this movement before and others may have more or better information than I.

Hope this helps.

JTD
 

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