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Please have a look on my transforming pocket OMEGA to wrist.

AntiqueWristCom

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I do it by myself with case and movement restoration.

Please your comments.

DSC_0331.jpg DSC_0365.jpg DSC_0347.jpg DSC_0371.jpg DSC_0359.jpg
 

Tom McIntyre

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Did you remove the pendant and add the lugs to the original case, or is the case adapted from a different one?

I did a double take on the pictures because you have the hands overlapping in the picture with the cover closed. I thought the minute hand was lost in that picture until I noticed the shadow on the dial from both hands. :)
 

dAz57

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I would say he has taken an original demi-hunter and converted it, it was a common sort of thing when wrist watches started becoming the thing, I certainly would not do this to a vintage piece today,

I get examples in of vintage movements installed in modern cases, some are well done, but I do stress to the owner this is still a vintage watch, meaning it is not shock or water resistant, break anything and parts may be hard to obtain or have to be made, a dress watch only, not an every day wearer.
 

glenhead

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I don't care for the type of conversion where they take an 18s and put it in a enormous modern case to make it a wristwatch. I really like yours, though! I particularly like adapting a demi-hunter like that, making a very trench-watch looking watch. What size is it? The lugs and strap pins blend beautifully with the style of the original watch. Are the lugs silver soldered, or laser welded, or how did you attach them? The joints are very nicely done.

Glen
 

AntiqueWristCom

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Jan 22, 2015
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Original OMEGA 49 mm antique solid 935 silver wrist watch 1901.
With new crocodile band with 925 silver buckle, solid silver 925 lugs soldered.
Case nbr :1483555
Swiss ancre original movement 15 jewels with bimetallic compensated balance and blued steel overcoiled hairspring.
Winding perfect and has about 45 hours power reserve.
2 Mineral glasses - new old stock.
Buckle and roller 925 silver, pins and shrink steel.

<span style="color: rgb(62, 62, 62); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: x-small; line-height: 21px;">[video=youtube;kaD3K-zZnYE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaD3K-zZnYE[/video]

View attachment 269887 View attachment 269888 View attachment 269889 View attachment 269890 View attachment 269891 View attachment 269892


Photo before transform:
Омега до 3.JPG Омега до 2.jpg Omega до.jpg


By the way, abt shock resistance. thing is modern watch has hard solid metal case. at the result shock came directly to the movement and it needs in shock-proof mechanism. Old watches case very soft and takes energy of shock to case dents. ones I drop one on stone floor. glass whip out, little dent, but balance and jewels was ok. If u want to make them waterproof, u can use silicon gasket in winding crown and covers. that will nicely protect it. but really, antique watch not modern, and not so useful, like modern. but useful enough for every day wearing, but not heavy duty. that is my own point of view, mb I mistake.

I am appreciated for your comments. Here more photos and videos. Is that watch still authentic after transforming? What do you think? Soon I ll put my result with open face, think it ll be more interesting.
fixme7111936

Омега до 3.JPG Омега до 2.jpg Omega до.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AntiqueWristCom

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[video=youtube;KtlAEebfiPo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtlAEebfiPo[/video]
 

Kevin W.

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Just my opinion but cant say i really like seeing pocket watches converted to wrist watches.
 

dAz57

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By the way, abt shock resistance. thing is modern watch has hard solid metal case. at the result shock came directly to the movement and it needs in shock-proof mechanism. Old watches case very soft and takes energy of shock to case dents. ones I drop one on stone floor. glass whip out, little dent, but balance and jewels was ok. If u want to make them waterproof, u can use silicon gasket in winding crown and covers. that will nicely protect it. but really, antique watch not modern, and not so useful, like modern. but useful enough for every day wearing, but not heavy duty. that is my own point of view, mb I mistake.
really?, one of the most common repairs in the old days was balance staffs, the watchmakers were very skilled in fitting new staffs, turning new staffs or repivoting them, the only reason that one survived was pure luck, not by design unless it was a dollar watch with cone pivots.
 

MartyR

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WAC, I'm interested to know why you converted the watch.
 

AntiqueWristCom

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Jan 22, 2015
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Original pocket OMEGA same case price is abt 500 $. Transformed wristwatch or trench same size price above 1200$ . Check prices on the market, please. Also a lot of average people want to wear antique wrist watch and does not want to wear it like pocket watches. I have my own site and several shops for selling them (ebay, chrono24 and so on). Also I have orders from customers for transforming pocket watch to wristwatches. Some of them like antique watches, some want to have possibility to wear brand watch for cheap price.Also its a good opportunity for pocket watch collectors to wear some of watch from collection on his wrist. That is a main reasons.
 

novicetimekeeper

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I can see there being a demand for this, though it isn't to my taste.

Current fashion trends are for bigger and bigger watches, so big they stop your cuffs from coming down your wrist. I can see people paying for a watch this size that nobody else has on their wrist as a statement.

It seems a shame if you like them in their original state but that's what makes original watches worth collecting, their rarity as the others get lost destroyed or altered.
 

AntiqueWristCom

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Jan 22, 2015
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In 1WW a lot of pocket watches was transformed to wrist, like that.
By the way before my restoration it was not working with damaged case piece for scrub. I save them from that destiny and now, from my point of view,it is a timepiece for proud of antique watch enthusiast.
 
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Tom McIntyre

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This topic has fascinated me for a long time. Antiquewristcom has taken a broken Omega demihunter pocket watch and converted it to a trench style wrist watch.

Some see this as an act of loving restoration of a memory of the past. Others see it as an act of desecration performed on a precious artifact.

I wonder if it is possible for those with these contrary views to understand one another? I wonder what the basis of the viewpoints are?

Clearly 100 years ago such an activity was commonplace as ladies' pendant watches became men's wrist watches. Are the ladies watches that survived now sufficiently uncommon that we should make an effort to preserve them before all are lost? Or, maybe, all watches that were produced before some certain date in the past deserve to be treated with great respect and integrity and may not be changed from their original purpose.

I would like to hear from those on both sides of this question with some introspection on why they have the feelings they do have. Antiquewristcom has stated his view very clearly as a person who makes his living creating timepieces people can wear. I have not really heard a clear rational description of the opposing view.
 

Omexa

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Hi Tom and others, it is well known that I have an extreme dislike of "Scrappers" I purchased this unfinished project a number of years ago and I have tried to get a case for it for years. It came with a Wrist Watch Case and I have finally decided to finish it off as is rather than let it gather dust in a drawer. I don't like doing it but what other choice do I have? Regards Ray 20150814_031421.jpg
 

RON in PA

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Personally, a wristwatch over 42-43mm is too large even if currently fashionable.

I'm not in favor of converting pocket watches into wristwatches. It's 2015, not 1915. I realize it's good business, but I consider preservation more important.

One more comment, in the first video the demi-hunter cover is repeatedly opened and snapped closed without pushing the crown in on closure. Great way to wear out the catch and/or notch.
 

MartyR

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We need to clear away some incorrect supposition from the argument.

If the original pocket watch was broken that is entirely irrelevant, since the "new" watch is not broken which means that the original movement was successfully repaired at modest cost.

So the issue is just money.

Unfortunately we are not allowed to discuss values of specific watches in this forum, but we can discuss the principles of this issue.

There is no doubt that the conversion from pocket watch to wrist watch caused the destruction of an antique watch and a well-known collectible. The wrist watch is not original, not an antique, and I guess is more of a desirable than a collectible.

So my question is simply this - does the amount of profit arising out of the conversion justify the destructive process?

Incidentally, however difficult it may be, I do ask that those entering the discussion avoid any attempt to place a specific value on the original or the converted watch. My guess is that in any event such valuation will be widely disputed.
 

Tom McIntyre

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Marty, in what sense do you feel the original watch has been destroyed? The conversions results in a watch that has silver lugs instead of a pendant. The conversion is documented, so no historical information is lost. If something is destroyed, something must have been lost, but I do not see what that was.

The fact that the broken ladies watch could have been made into a working ladies watch is clear. What is not clear is if anyone would have wanted that and if it could have been done at a cost that would justify doing it.

I worry that we anthropomorphize these artifacts and confer on them the same rights we would to another human being.
 

Omexa

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Hi Tom, I anthropomorphize all my Pocket Watches, if they run good or the repairs go nicely I tell them they are good boys or girls and take them for an outing to the shops or the Club. Regards Ray
 

dAz57

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some years ago a customer bought in a nice 18ct Waltham ladies fob hunter, this had a fully hand engraved case, this belonged to her grandmother, her mother who lived in a retirement village had a another resident "look" at it, it wasn't running and he couldn't fix it, so he converted it, took the movement out, chopped off the pendant, soldered a pair of wire lugs, cut the feet off the enamel dial and fitted a quartz.

the customer was not happy to say the least, her mother didn't even ask her opinion, anyway I asked "do you have the original movement?", "no he still has it" she said, so I told to her to get it back, which she did hopefully tearing strips of skin off him in the process one can hope.

the problem with the movement?, broken balance staff on a watch that new staffs can still be bought.

so I rebuilt the pendant with the oval bow in gold, had my jeweler remove the lugs, fit the pendant, I threaded it to take a new sleeve, serviced the movement, new staff, 3 new feet on the dial, and basically brought the watch back to it's original condition with a few minor scars and my customer has her grandmothers watch back, working and something she can hand down to her daughter.
 

MartyR

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Marty, in what sense do you feel the original watch has been destroyed?
In the sense that the original watch was an Omega pocket watch which no longer exists.

I have no idea what you mean by "we anthropomorphise" these things. I certainly don't and I know no-one who does. Nor do I know anyone who confers human rights to a watch - that is just bonkers.

The simple fact is that the original Omega pocket watch was a decent quality, interesting, historically relevant artefact.

The converted watch will carry forward some part of that decent quality, perhaps some of the interest, and in place of historical relevance will offer perhaps utility as an artefact. The converted watch is simply a new watch using old technology. I don't say that has no value in today's market, but I doubt that it will maintain that market value for long. In 20 years it will likely be junked, whereas as an Omega pocket watch it would probably have survived.

Does any of that matter? I would prefer the original artefact to have survived, but I can't bust a gut over its demise. I don't think the original watch was a holy object, but then again I don't want to trust ephemeral market fancy to dictate its fate.
 

AntiqueWristCom

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Jan 22, 2015
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Thank you a lot for your comments. It is very important to me. What will you say about authenticity of that watch: Rolex Rebberg.
I insert it to the ring. No solder lugs at all.
Also please comments: do you like design and construction?
Rolex Rebberg vintage wrist watch.jpg Rolex antique wrist watch.jpg Rolex Rebberg antique rare watch.jpg Rolex vintage silver wrist watch.jpg
Solid silver Rolex Robber, original case and movement 1907.
Ring 40 mm in diameter, material - 925 solid silver, decor pins - 14Kt gold.
[video=youtube;jJ86ANY7Yqw]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJ86ANY7Yqw&amp;feature=youtu.be[/video]
 

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