Pinwheel table clock Franklin, Stowe

Tom McIntyre

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A friend of mine owns this clock and would like to know what its date and origin might be. We are not sure whether it is American or English.

Is anyone familiar with Franklin in Stowe?

20160719_101431.jpg 20160719_101506.jpg 20160719_101615_001.jpg dialCropped.jpg DSC_0015.jpg Franklin.jpg Franklin2.jpg
 

wisty

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My copy of Britten lists two William Franklins one admitted to the clockmakers company in 1712, the other (possibly a son) in 1731.
The latter and a late date (1750- 1760's) looks a likely date - the pinwheel escapement was not invented until 1741 (assuming that is original?) and probably English, Stowe is a small village in Buckinghamshire north of London.
Very nice clock!
 
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jmclaugh

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Can't find a William Franklin listed in Stowe in my reference sources. Britten does have the ones mentioned above but no specific location is given.
 

Tom McIntyre

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My copy of Britten lists two William Franklins one admitted to the clockmakers company in 1712, the other (possibly a son) in 1731.
The latter and a late date (1750- 1760's) looks a likely date - the pinwheel escapement was not invented until 1741 (assuming that is original?) and probably English, Stowe is a small village in Buckinghamshire north of London.
Very nice clock!
That sounds like a good match. My friend was hoping the maker was related to Benjamin Franklin.:)
 

Safwat Wahba

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The movement is attached with 2 screws through the bottom unusual for English clocks. This is similar to a PA clock by Thomas Parker at NAWCC museum sharing many similarities including the pinwheel and going barrel. There is a Stowe in PA only 40 miles away from Philadelphia. Like Ralph said, an English clock of this period would have had a fusee.

P1000533.jpg Pinwheel2-001.jpg Pinwheel.jpg
 

Chris Radano

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There are English clocks from the late 18th c.- early 19th c. that have going barrels. They are uncommon but I have seen a few browsing at auctions in England. Sometimes made by appentices? I think I may have read that somewhere. That clock looks entirely English to me. And I would guess no earlier than 1780's. The plates are probably from London but may be an unusual smaller size. And an unfortunate dial repaint.
 

Mike Phelan

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Given the going barrels, dial type and slightly thin plates I don't think it's English or even British. Auctioneers can be wrong.
 

Robert Pritzker

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One wonders if the striking mechanism of the Franklin clock has the same Pennsylvania German style. Certainly, from the pictures, the mounting and absence of fusees reflects a style identical to the Pennsylvanian, Parker. It is quite unlikely that a maker in the British Isles would use a continental or North American style.
 
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Ralph

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I forgot there were pictures of the front of the movement. The striking looks traditional English (or American) to me.

Regards, Ralph
 

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