Pin pinion on Mauthe wall clock shaft

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by ringhilescu, Jul 13, 2019.

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  1. ringhilescu

    ringhilescu Registered User

    Sep 23, 2010
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    Good evening
    I have a Mauthe wall clock, 1926 manufacturing year. The problem I have been facing for 2 days is the next. When the bow of the gong returns, after about 2, 3 turns, in which it feels that the spring is tensioning, the sprocket 2, along with the spindle (3) on which it is fastened, performs a rotation motion, the spring deforms, while during that time , the pinion 1 remains motionless. It is perhaps unnecessary to say that the gong does not work anymore, as long as the bow can not be tightened. My questions are as follows:
    1. Is this piece, made up of pinions 1 and 2, a name of its own?
    2. How can this problem be remedied?
    3. The pinion 1 and the pinion 2 are fixed parts on the shaft 3?
    4. If the pinion 1 is a fixed part on the shaft 3, how does it lock on the shaft?

    I attach the picture.
    Thank you
    2_1.png
     
  2. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    That would commonly be called the 2nd wheel assembly. It is made from only two pieces. The arbor and pinion is cut from one piece of steel and the brass wheel is permanently attached. Nothing is supposed to cause these pieces to move in relation to each other.

    Maybe you could explain more about the specific problem you clock is having?

    Willie X
     
  3. R&A

    R&A Registered User

    Oct 21, 2008
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    Well for one thing there are names for 1 2 3 1 is wheel 2 is a leave pinion 3 is an arbor
    Wheels are staked to the arbor. In this case it looks to be staked to the top of the leave pinion which is part of the arbor. It is really hard to understand what you are asking.
     
  4. ringhilescu

    ringhilescu Registered User

    Sep 23, 2010
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    To be more specific, I attach and this video
    https://vimeo.com/user100789781/review/347980143/01ec282f39

    Thank You
     
  5. R&A

    R&A Registered User

    Oct 21, 2008
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  6. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    The spring added to the lower arbor is binding the upper one. Both should have the same type of spring as the upper arbor has....a wire return spring attached to the plate. If either pinion is turning independently, it's defective .... but that would be VERY unusual in this design.
     
  7. ringhilescu

    ringhilescu Registered User

    Sep 23, 2010
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    Hi
    I found the problem. I have to repress wheel 1 on the leve pinion 2. Is it a complicated operation? Can I do it home, or should I take them to a specialist? If this procedure can be done, exactly, what are the steps ?

    Thank you!
     
  8. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    You mean the pinion is turning on the arbor?
     
  9. ringhilescu

    ringhilescu Registered User

    Sep 23, 2010
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  10. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    Yeah, it sure is! This usually indicates a cracked pinion, and the repair won't be easy. The pinion will need to be removed from the arbor and repaired, and then inserted again. If you could find a donor clock to take the wheel from, that would be easiest .... but it might be hard to find one. A clock repair shop with good equipment and skills could make you a new wheel with the pinion as part of the arbor. I think I'd go for that solution.
     
  11. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Sep 4, 2008
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    I think the pinion is part of the arbor. The issue is that the wheel, that is staked to the pinion (like often seen in more modern clocks), has come loose and needs to be staked back on.

    Uhralt
     
  12. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    That is sure possible. Ring, can we see that wheel out of the movement from a couple different angles? You might be able to fix it if it's just a staking issue.
     
  13. Ravens_Time

    Ravens_Time Registered User
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    Nov 26, 2016
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    That barrel hook looks like its about to let go.
     
  14. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Sep 4, 2008
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    It looks like it has been struck from the inside by a broken mainspring. The broken spring also might have caused the damage to the wheel/pinion connection. Another possibility would be a failing click for the same symptoms.

    Uhralt
     

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