Pillar Attachment

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by rgmt79, Aug 3, 2017.

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  1. rgmt79

    rgmt79 Registered User
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    Jul 23, 2016
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    I recently started a post "Silk Suspension" which goes on to describe (with photo's) an Austrian (we think) Grande Sonnerie movement I'm currently working on. I'm starting a new post here to avoid going off topic and is to do with clock construction. I'm intrigued to know how the pillars have been attached to the plate, pictures below...from my limited experience, they are normally attached with a threaded portion through a hole in the plate and secured with a nut or a plain shank through the hole and secured by a tapered pin. In this case, the opposite plate is secured with a tapered pin, but I cannot work out how the other end is secured because nothing is protruding through the plate (which is just under 3mm thick) and I can see no evidence of soldering on the other side...I can clean the plate with the pillars attached, so there is no need to remove them...I'm just curious:)

    Richard 312439.jpg 312440.jpg 312441.jpg
     
  2. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

    Jul 26, 2015
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    They are riveted to the plate. The plate has a countersunk hole on the outer side, the pillar goes through and the end is hammered to fill the countersink the end is then finished flush with the plate. It's the same method used on the English longcase that I collect.
     
  3. rgmt79

    rgmt79 Registered User
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    Jul 23, 2016
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    Thank you Nick, that was my initial thoughts too, but I cannot see any evidence of riveting on the outside of the plate. Perhaps I will be able to see some circular outline when I finally get around to cleaning and polishing. There is no doubt that the level of craftsmanship in the making of this movement is of the highest standard.

    Richard, also a late starter and lots to learn:)
     
  4. Phil Burman

    Phil Burman Registered User

    Mar 8, 2014
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    I can see a circular outline in the second picture

    Phil:)
     
  5. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

    Jul 26, 2015
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    As the plates and pillars are all cast from the same alloy when done well it can be very hard to see the join.
     

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